MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index
 FAQ & Terms of UseFAQ & Terms Of Use   Wiggler RadioMW Radio   Muff Wiggler TwitterTwitter   Support the site @ PatreonPatreon 
 SearchSearch   RegisterSign up   Log inLog in 
WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

Serious domestic monitoring rooms and monitors ?
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> General Gear Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4  Next [all]
Author Serious domestic monitoring rooms and monitors ?
mousegarden
I'm sure a lot of you are aware of my present situation, I have to find a job, and seeing as that it is very difficult here in London UK right now, until I do find one I have to do something in the meantime. I've decided to have have a serious go at location recording. Up until now my "studio" has been in what is my bedroom, it's not ideal, I haven't bothered to move things since my wife left, but now I have free reign as to where to relocate my equipment. If I'm going to be recording seriously, I need a decent no compromise monitoring and editing environment.
I'm planning to move into a bigger room, it is a large Victorian living room, 18ft X 15 ft, with lots of alcoves, and a large bay window. I'm planning to put the monitors firing across the short axis of the room, with the rear of the speakers well away from the walls, each speaker will have a different distance behind it to the boundary walls. The ceiling of this room is 15ft high.
I think the room sounds excellent "as is" it is a very good listening environment, I may have to apply a little acoustic treatment to tame the high end, but I won't know if that's going to be necessary until I've got everything in place in the room.
The speakers I am planing to audition are PMC TWOTWO 8's and 5's, and the ATC SCM 25. The speakers I'm not too worried about, I think they are a good choice in that price range, but it's the room, and the general placement of monitors and equipment that is worrying me, I just wondered if anyone has any tips on this ? or can spot anything that I'm doing obviously wrong ?

MouseGarden.
StoneLaw
I find high ceilings way better than low ones. Sounds like you know what you are doing and seems reasonable. Don't cheat that distance between speakers and the wall that gap helps a lot.

Bass traps, especially Owens Corning 705 ones will help even bass in the room. I wouldn't go crazy taming the high end, especially if the floor is carpeted. Maybe just some 703 panels on first reflection spots, or hanging a panel on the ceiling above the gap between your speakers and listening area.
mousegarden
StoneLaw wrote:
or hanging a panel on the ceiling above the gap between your speakers and listening area.


Thank's, that panel above the monitors, I've heard major improvements in other people's studios, it's a good idea, like to know how it works, acoustically. it's worth investing in.......

MouseGarden.
jonbstevens
Re: panels on the ceiling google first reflections. Put your trap on the wall and ceiling at the halfway point between your listening position and the monitor. Not only will you improve the room acoustic, but you'll improve stereo imaging as well.
stk
Few things.
You want your speaker layout to be as symmetrical as possible, not "each speaker will have a different distance behind it to the boundary walls".

Usually, it is best to have the speakers firing down the length of the room (not always, but it is more common).

You will need treatment, especially in the low-mid to low frequencies.
High end is comparatively easy to treat.
mousegarden
stk wrote:
Few things.
You want your speaker layout to be as symmetrical as possible, not "each speaker will have a different distance behind it to the boundary walls".

Usually, it is best to have the speakers firing down the length of the room (not always, but it is more common).

You will need treatment, especially in the low-mid to low frequencies.
High end is comparatively easy to treat.


The issues I've noticed are that the sound changes as you move around, not much though, and it's totally confined to the bass, it increases as I get nearer to the walls, the proximity effect, but I guess this is unavoidable ? The upper bass, or lower mid, is fine, and when all of my stuff is in there I think the top end should be fine. The main thing is stereo imaging, it's a bit vague, the speakers will be about 7ft apart, and I will be sitting at the point of an equilateral triangle 7 ft in front of the speakers. I am planning to have a really large sofa in there, against the wall, so I guess that may act like a bass trap ?

MouseGarden.
NYMo
Ok...here you go Mouse hihi

Spend a few months here,.. ( I did !)

Johnlsayers.com

Cheers
mousegarden
NYMo wrote:
Ok...here you go Mouse hihi

Spend a few months here,.. ( I did !)

Johnlsayers.com

Cheers


Thank's, but I can't connect to the link ??

hmmm.....

MouseGarden.
drip.feed
mousegarden, have you spent time at soundonsound.com? Those guys have been giving the kind of advice you want for literally decades.

In short, the rules of thumb for home studios are:
-- Point your speakers down the length of the room. This generally avoids your ears being in the middle of the room and therefore in a shitty position.
-- Fill the room with whatever furniture (bookcases, rugs, sofas etc.) you plan to put in there before attempting to treat it.
-- Spend a long time getting to know your speakers.
-- Don't listen for long periods above 83dB.

For kicks check out Ian Shepard's home studio build diary. He has some useful info about treatment:



thumbs up
digitalganesha
mousegarden wrote:
stk wrote:
Few things.
You want your speaker layout to be as symmetrical as possible, not "each speaker will have a different distance behind it to the boundary walls".

Usually, it is best to have the speakers firing down the length of the room (not always, but it is more common).

You will need treatment, especially in the low-mid to low frequencies.
High end is comparatively easy to treat.


The issues I've noticed are that the sound changes as you move around, not much though, and it's totally confined to the bass, it increases as I get nearer to the walls, the proximity effect, but I guess this is unavoidable ? The upper bass, or lower mid, is fine, and when all of my stuff is in there I think the top end should be fine. The main thing is stereo imaging, it's a bit vague, the speakers will be about 7ft apart, and I will be sitting at the point of an equilateral triangle 7 ft in front of the speakers. I am planning to have a really large sofa in there, against the wall, so I guess that may act like a bass trap ?

MouseGarden.


Yes the sofa will help with capturing reflections and dampening, but the sound SHOULD change as you move around the room provided you are monitoring on near-fields. That's the nature and purpose of them. My mixing room is padded with foam, basstraps, deflectors, etc. I even have closed cell acoustic underlayment beneath the carpet - it's nice but not 100% necessary these days. A bare room is the worst thing ever to mix within. Gear does not count as room filler since it's mostly metal and plastic which absorb nothing. Furniture helps, acoustic foam properly placed (even if it's minimal) is a must as others have stated above; and near-field monitor placement, your ability to hear the full spectrum of the audio and using a sub with your monitoring will make your life a lot easier.

These days most music is converted to MP3 (which compresses it) and or is either listened to on computer speakers and car stereos - so you have to factor and utilize these in your mixing. Mix in phases just like you would go about a painting/art piece - 1) rough mix in your studio as you track, 2) EQing, reverb, pan and placement in the stereo field, 3) monitor in good CONSUMER headphones like someone would use (I use Bose) - make fine tune adjustments, then… 4) listen to the recording on a house stereo system, computer speakers, laptop and (essential) in at least two vehicles. Note what needs adjustment and then repeat till your are pretty satisfied with the sound on all of them.
mousegarden
drip.feed wrote:
mousegarden, have you spent time at soundonsound.com? Those guys have been giving the kind of advice you want for literally decades.

In short, the rules of thumb for home studios are:
-- Point your speakers down the length of the room. This generally avoids your ears being in the middle of the room and therefore in a shitty position.
-- Fill the room with whatever furniture (bookcases, rugs, sofas etc.) you plan to put in there before attempting to treat it.
-- Spend a long time getting to know your speakers.
-- Don't listen for long periods above 83dB.

For kicks check out Ian Shepard's home studio build diary. He has some useful info about treatment:



thumbs up


Thank's for that link, really useful. Currently my speakers are firing across the short axis of the room, and the biggest problem is they are against the wall.
I won't bother to make any judgments until the room is organised and full up with my stuff. It's going to take a while for me to get used to my new speakers, I've never before had the chance to use anything even vaguely considered to be professional. I'll be going from a pair of 40 year old Tannoy Mercury hi-fi speakers to a pair of PMC's or ATC's, which is going to be interesting to say the least !

MouseGarden.
drip.feed
mousegarden wrote:
I'll be going from a pair of 40 year old Tannoy Mercury hi-fi speakers to a pair of PMC's or ATC's, which is going to be interesting to say the least !

Good God, you are in for a treat. I upgraded from a pair of Tannoy Mercury bookshelf speakers myself. I went for Yamahas with an 8" cone. It took me a long time to tame them (using the switches on the back and stuffing socks into the reflex ports!).
mousegarden
drip.feed wrote:
mousegarden wrote:
I'll be going from a pair of 40 year old Tannoy Mercury hi-fi speakers to a pair of PMC's or ATC's, which is going to be interesting to say the least !

Good God, you are in for a treat. I upgraded from a pair of Tannoy Mercury bookshelf speakers myself. I went for Yamahas with an 8" cone. It took me a long time to tame them (using the switches on the back and stuffing socks into the reflex ports!).


It's very easy in this game to get bamboozled by trends and sales talk, my old Tannoys have been great, they sound a lot better in fact than a lot of so called "monitors" the bass is boxy, and lacks depth, but the top end is quite good, not too forward or harsh. I've listened to a lot of modern speakers, and so far, I wouldn't have bought any of them, they all seem to sound very harsh, with loads of horrible boomy bass. Sometimes I think the designers must have been deaf. I'm really going to be tough on the new speakers, I'm not going to accept any excuses, if I have to fiddle around endlessly with EQ switches to make then sound any good in here then forget it, you can make more or less anything sound acceptable with EQ, I'm not a big fan of that way of designing speakers.
The Yamaha's ? I was thinking about those, quite a few people use them when I go to modular meets, they always catch my ear, as they seem to have a very detailed mid range, and make things stand out, they have a very lively sound. What about the top end ? is it too forward ?

MouseGarden.
flo
I agree, monitors should point down the long axis.

To identify first reflection points, you can use a mirror (and a friend). Check them to the left, right and ceiling and apply absorbers. Bass panels in the corners. What's your budget for treatment?

Your room is big enough to justify some diffusion IMO. Probably best at the back wall. That will help "unify" the sound across the whole room.

Regarding speaker placement, you want them to be symmetrical left and right. Furthermore, the two speakers and your head should form an unilateral triangle. Place everything so that you are sitting about 38% into the room (measured from front or back).
drip.feed
Well, firstly, those EQ switches are there to compensate for a compromised position in a room, not simply to make the speakers sound better. So I see them as a good thing. For example, my Yamahas are intended to be placed well away from walls and corners. But, of course, like you I don't have that luxury. So trim switches are provided to roll off the bass if you need to push them up against a wall, or if you are not interested in mixing music with a lot of low end. Similarly there are high frequency trimmers to tailor the Yamaha NS10-type sound if you think it's a bit harsh. Plenty of people do (which begs the question "why did you buy Yamahas then?").

My Yams (HS10M's) sounded very toppy rather than harsh when I first got them. I thought I'd made a terrible mistake. But I love them now that I am used to them and have trimmed a few dB off the bass. The 'forward' upper-mids and high end help me monitor at low volumes and compensate for the loss of high frequency sensitivity in my old ears. And modular synths sound great through them, their the tinkly highs and reverb tails and deep bass.

I have used the HS5Ms in a smaller studio control room and they sound completely fantastic. We were tracking and mixing rock/indie music. They probably sound damn near unbeatable with the matching Yamaha sub woofer.

I have also used Mackie HR824 MkI monitors and they had a much more mellow high end than my Yamahas and a kind of plummy, boxy low end. I didn't like them too much but they got rave reviews at the time and were a lot more expensive.

I seriously doubt that whatever speakers you choose will sound like those old Tannoys, not even modern Tannoys. I guess speaker technology has changed to cope with modern demands - plenty of modern electronic music and heavy metal require very responsive and revealing monitors. That equates to POW bass, CRASH mids and SIZZLE high end.

Another tip maybe: I use a little Focusrite VRM box to simulate what my mixes sound like on different speakers in different rooms. You can get one cheap 2nd hand on eBay. It sounds like a gimmick but it works much better than you'd think. It has helped lots of my mixes. But you will need good headphones: anything under £100 is unlikely to be worth using.
mousegarden
drip.feed wrote:
Well, firstly, those EQ switches are there to compensate for a compromised position in a room, not simply to make the speakers sound better. So I see them as a good thing. For example, my Yamahas are intended to be placed well away from walls and corners. But, of course, like you I don't have that luxury. So trim switches are provided to roll off the bass if you need to push them up against a wall, or if you are not interested in mixing music with a lot of low end. Similarly there are high frequency trimmers to tailor the Yamaha NS10-type sound if you think it's a bit harsh. Plenty of people do (which begs the question "why did you buy Yamahas then?").

My Yams (HS10M's) sounded very toppy rather than harsh when I first got them. I thought I'd made a terrible mistake. But I love them now that I am used to them and have trimmed a few dB off the bass. The 'forward' upper-mids and high end help me monitor at low volumes and compensate for the loss of high frequency sensitivity in my old ears. And modular synths sound great through them, their the tinkly highs and reverb tails and deep bass.

I have used the HS5Ms in a smaller studio control room and they sound completely fantastic. We were tracking and mixing rock/indie music. They probably sound damn near unbeatable with the matching Yamaha sub woofer.

I have also used Mackie HR824 MkI monitors and they had a much more mellow high end than my Yamahas and a kind of plummy, boxy low end. I didn't like them too much but they got rave reviews at the time and were a lot more expensive.

I seriously doubt that whatever speakers you choose will sound like those old Tannoys, not even modern Tannoys. I guess speaker technology has changed to cope with modern demands - plenty of modern electronic music and heavy metal require very responsive and revealing monitors. That equates to POW bass, CRASH mids and SIZZLE high end.

Another tip maybe: I use a little Focusrite VRM box to simulate what my mixes sound like on different speakers in different rooms. You can get one cheap 2nd hand on eBay. It sounds like a gimmick but it works much better than you'd think. It has helped lots of my mixes. But you will need good headphones: anything under £100 is unlikely to be worth using.


I will give the Yamaha's a serous listen. My current studio room is 14ft X 11ft my speakers are firing across the short axis, and my listening poison is 3ft 6 inches from the front wall, well away from the middle, but not far enough away from my speakers ! My speakers are 7ft apart, which is not ideal.
My proposed listening room is much bigger, 16ft X 18ft, both rooms have 15ft ceilings. The big room has lots of different sized alcoves, and a really large bay window, which is down the short side. The room is going to be stripped out, so I can start from scratch, I don't have an unlimited budget for soundproofing but I'm willing to spend a reasonable amount. The thing is, the large room doesn't sound bad ! Everyone who's ever been in there comments on how great the room sounds, you could put any old crap in there and it would still sound good ! There is something that is inherently right about this room which is why I want to use it. So on that basis I don't think ther is going to be much to do, apart from trying to improve the stereo imaging, as it gets a bit lost in there. I've recorded small ensembles, and folk singers in there though, and it alway sounds good.
This is a big decision, as I normally use this room as a live room, and the adjacent smaller room, as a control room, so moving into the bigger room to master is going stop me using that room for live work. The alternative is to try and make the smaller room sound better, and move my stuff around. But there's one snag......it's also my bedroom !

MouseGarden.
stk
@mousegarden
Sorry for not quoting inline, i'm on the ifad and quoting is a pita.

But a couple more follow on points;

Bass traps. You will need them. They can be built for cheap.

The link Nymo posted is gold, lots of info there, as well as the Gearslutz studio construction forum (yes it is GS, but there's a bunch of very knowledgable professional studio designers that post in there).

By all means put yr furniture in, but get the room sounding good before you set up your equipment. I know from experience that the urge to set up the blinkenlights is almost irresistable, but you'll probably just have to move it all agian. Just set up speakers, do tests, move speakers, do test, repeat, repeat, repeat.
mousegarden
stk wrote:
@mousegarden
Sorry for not quoting inline, i'm on the ifad and quoting is a pita.

But a couple more follow on points;

Bass traps. You will need them. They can be built for cheap.

The link Nymo posted is gold, lots of info there, as well as the Gearslutz studio construction forum (yes it is GS, but there's a bunch of very knowledgable professional studio designers that post in there).

By all means put yr furniture in, but get the room sounding good before you set up your equipment. I know from experience that the urge to set up the blinkenlights is almost irresistable, but you'll probably just have to move it all agian. Just set up speakers, do tests, move speakers, do test, repeat, repeat, repeat.


I know I should ask over at GS, and SOS, but you always get loads of conflicting replies, and I always end up more confused then when I started !
I'll take your advice, for starters, and I have someone from PMC coming here, to demonstrate some speakers for me, one of our chaps in fact ! So getting the speakers in here, and doing a few tests "as is" should reveal a lot, plus there will be two pairs of ears. I think I just have to keep my feet on the ground, trust my ears, and not get too confused.

MouseGarden.
drip.feed
mousegarden wrote:
I have someone from PMC coming here, to demonstrate some speakers for me, one of our chaps in fact ! So getting the speakers in here, and doing a few tests "as is" should reveal a lot, plus there will be two pairs of ears.

That's fantastic! Let us know how that goes. I don't even have a shop in Belfast to hear the monitors I want to buy - I just have to read a lot and make a best guess.
listentoaheartbeat
I've built a couple of project studios, and helped friends to improve their rooms. Here are a couple hints and ideas based on my experience.

As others have said, definitely place your monitors firing down the long axis. One reason is that the axis the speaker point at is usually creating the strongest bass node and with the longest distance it is being moved down in the spectrum.

Place your workstation in the first third of the long axis of the room and perform a couple listening test to find the spot with the flattest base response. Don't hesitate to put them closer to the wall than you first planned. If it sounds right, it is right. High frequency comb filtering from wall reflections is easier to deal with than issues with bass nodes.

Since the width and the height of your room are matching, you can expect the issues of the corresponding nodes to add up. Given the distance of 15 feet you have to look out for resonances and notches around 75 Hertz and multiples. If you have drywalls you may be lucky and some of the energy gets absorbed or transmitted.

Use Basotect / Melamin absorbers. They are by far the most effective open, cellular absorbers. Very cost effective. The 10 cm thick ones, mounted with an additional 10-15 cm distance to your walls, will give you decent absorption coefficent down to the lower mids. You should cover about 15-30% of your room surface with these absorbers, depending on how long your want your RT60 to be. This includes the floor, however areas covered with carpets or upholstered furniture do not count towards the surface. You should distribute them in the room with an emphasis on the front third of your room where the workstation is, approximation the 'live end - dead end' concept. Make sure the surfaces mirroring from the speakers to your listening position are well covered, since these early reflections will mess with your stereo image. Hang a couple of the absorbers from the ceiling above the workstation, mounted on a perforated plate. This will increase the angle in which there are no ceiling reflections at the listening position.

Electronic room correction is very useful in a project studio environment, when space and money do not allow for individual acoustic bass treatment. It's important to note that this only really works in the sweet spot, however for an editing workstation this should not be an issue. Real bass treatment is very complicated to plan and build, and most of the DIY projects I have come across have either had no effect or have made things worse.

What's important about electronic room correction with filters is that one should only use it in the lower frequency spectrum. An even high frequency response is rather easy to achieve using cellular absorbers and you will have to use these anyways in order to get your RT60 right.

As far as software solutions go, check out the HISS Tools for a great software solution (requires Max). Here's another one which I have not tried. Stay away from ARC by IK Multimedia, it's terrible and will completely distort the response of your speakers. It works over the complete spectrum, which does not make any sense.

The KRK Ergo system is actually better than most people think. It's a stand-alone box configured via Firewire. It should not be used as an audio interface (the drivers are shit) but you can also drive it via SPDIF and just use it as your monitor controller, with a nice volume pot and a decent headphone output. Unfortunately, there is no way to display and / or edit the measurements and filter response. However, the algorithms are working very well and are following the most important rule with electronic room correction: Cut where possible, and boost only little. Boosting certain frequencies a lot will mess with the headroom of your speakers and create all kinds of other problems (acoustic compression of the speaker, amp clipping / limiting etc.). The measurement process needs to be carefully carried out with very random mic placements outside of the sweet spot, but after some experiments I was able to achieve astonishing good results with the Ergo. It works up to 500 hz, which is a good range for electronic room correction.

Of course, you can also carry out impulse response measurement and add correction filters manually, however there is the a lot of potential for error. I am in the process of doing this for my room, I can report back how it goes if you are interested. I may go for the HISS Tools, but I'd prefer something independent from Max.
mousegarden
listentoaheartbeat wrote:
I've built a couple of project studios, and helped friends to improve their rooms. Here are a couple hints and ideas based on my experience.

As others have said, definitely place your monitors firing down the long axis. One reason is that the axis the speaker point at is usually creating the strongest bass node and with the longest distance it is being moved down in the spectrum.

Place your workstation in the first third of the long axis of the room and perform a couple listening test to find the spot with the flattest base response. Don't hesitate to put them closer to the wall than you first planned. If it sounds right, it is right. High frequency comb filtering from wall reflections is easier to deal with than issues with bass nodes.

Since the width and the height of your room are matching, you can expect the issues of the corresponding nodes to add up. Given the distance of 15 feet you have to look out for resonances and notches around 75 Hertz and multiples. If you have drywalls you may be lucky and some of the energy gets absorbed or transmitted.

Use Basotect / Melamin absorbers. They are by far the most effective open, cellular absorbers. Very cost effective. The 10 cm thick ones, mounted with an additional 10-15 cm distance to your walls, will give you decent absorption coefficent down to the lower mids. You should cover about 15-30% of your room surface with these absorbers, depending on how long your want your RT60 to be. This includes the floor, however areas covered with carpets or upholstered furniture do not count towards the surface. You should distribute them in the room with an emphasis on the front third of your room where the workstation is, approximation the 'live end - dead end' concept. Make sure the surfaces mirroring from the speakers to your listening position are well covered, since these early reflections will mess with your stereo image. Hang a couple of the absorbers from the ceiling above the workstation, mounted on a perforated plate. This will increase the angle in which there are no ceiling reflections at the listening position.

Electronic room correction is very useful in a project studio environment, when space and money do not allow for individual acoustic bass treatment. It's important to note that this only really works in the sweet spot, however for an editing workstation this should not be an issue. Real bass treatment is very complicated to plan and build, and most of the DIY projects I have come across have either had no effect or have made things worse.

What's important about electronic room correction with filters is that one should only use it in the lower frequency spectrum. An even high frequency response is rather easy to achieve using cellular absorbers and you will have to use these anyways in order to get your RT60 right.

If you are using Max, check out the HISS Tools for a great software solution. Here's another one which I have not tried.

Stay away from ARC by IK Multimedia, it's terrible and will completely distort the response of your speakers. It works over the complete spectrum, which does not make any sense.

The KRK Ergo system is actually better than most people think. It should not be used as an audio interface (the drivers are shit) but you can also drive it via SPDIF. Unfortunately, there is no way to display and / or edit the measurements and filter response. However, the algorithms are working very well and are following the most important rule with electronic room correction: Cut where possible, and boost only little. Boosting certain frequencies a lot will mess with the headroom of your speakers and create all kinds of other problems (acoustic compression of the speaker, amp clipping / limiting etc.). The measurement process needs to be carefully carried out with very random mic placements outside of the sweet spot, but after some experiments I was able to achieve astonishing good results with the Ergo. It works up to 500 hz, which is a good range for electronic room correction.

Of course, you can also carry out impulse response measurement and add correction filters manually, however there is the a lot of potential for error.


Thank's for taking the time to post this, it's much appreciated.
You've cleared up a few points for me straight away, and I really must move my desk around to use the long axis of the room. That's a given I think.
One of the problems I have is the computer monitor, in relation to speaker placement, in order to maintain the triangle, I have to place the speakers too close to me, to get around them reflecting off of the back of the screen, this immediately reduces the distance I can get between me and a decent sized monitor ?

MouseGarden.
listentoaheartbeat
Oh, and check out the Neumann O310 monitors! I've been using their predecessor (Klein & Hummel O300) for almost 10 years now and never considered swapping them for something else. I am a big fan of closed speaker designs and these are particularly amazing. They are definitely up to the standard of PMC and ATC and don't cost as much.
mousegarden
listentoaheartbeat wrote:
Oh, and check out the Neumann O310 monitors! I've been using their predecessor (Klein & Hummel O300) for almost 10 years now and never considered swapping them for something else. I am a big fan of closed speaker designs and these are particularly amazing. They are definitely up to the standard of PMC and ATC and don't cost as much.


Yes ! a friend has a pair of 0300's, he is going to bring them here for me to try in my room. TBQH I've never really liked them, but..........that may have something to do with the rooms I've heard them in. I heard a pair in a BBC control room and they were stunning, truly remarkable, but when my friend bought his they sounded terrible in his room, too much bass, and a really spiky top end. So it's going to be interesting listening to them here ! The top end on ATC's is heavenly for me, very natural, not hyped in any way at all, but they do tend to be a bit bass light sometimes. PMC is still an unknown quantity, but worth auditioning.

MouseGarden.
listentoaheartbeat
mousegarden wrote:
Thank's for taking the time to post this, it's much appreciated.


You are welcome!

mousegarden wrote:
One of the problems I have is the computer monitor, in relation to speaker placement, in order to maintain the triangle, I have to place the speakers too close to me, to get around them reflecting off of the back of the screen, this immediately reduces the distance I can get between me and a decent sized monitor ?


Yeah, common issue. Here's a couple solutions:

1. Put the display on your table, at a flat angle so you can look down on it. It should not be too flat and too close, since this can get a little hard on your neck.

2. Use a rather low table, and a relatively high chair so that you can place the monitors above the display and still having them at ears height. This also works well in combination with option 1 and allows for a less flat display position and / or a higher table or lower chair.

3. Some people also have the monitors above the display with a low listening position relative to the monitors, and make them point downwards at an angle. I never liked this, possibly because the elevation messes with the spectrum due to a different HRTF (head related transfer function).

In any case, I'd definitely make the perfect triangle happen, it's very important for the image (at least with most monitors). Also make sure you are maintaining a perfect symmetry in the room.
mousegarden
listentoaheartbeat wrote:
mousegarden wrote:
Thank's for taking the time to post this, it's much appreciated.


You are welcome!

mousegarden wrote:
One of the problems I have is the computer monitor, in relation to speaker placement, in order to maintain the triangle, I have to place the speakers too close to me, to get around them reflecting off of the back of the screen, this immediately reduces the distance I can get between me and a decent sized monitor ?


Yeah, common issue. Here's a couple solutions:

1. Put the display on your table, at a flat angle so you can look down on it. It should not be too flat and too close, since this can get a little hard on your neck.

2. Use a rather low table, and a relatively high chair so that you can place the monitors above the display and still having them at ears height. This also works well in combination with option 1 and allows for a less flat display position and / or a higher table or lower chair.

3. Some people also have the monitors above the display with a low listening position relative to the monitors, and make them point downwards at an angle. I never liked this, possibly because the elevation messes with the spectrum due to a different HRTF (head related transfer function).

In any case, I'd definitely make the perfect triangle happen, it's very important for the image (at least with most monitors). Also make sure you are maintaining a perfect symmetry in the room.


My equipment table is 5ft long, and 32" deep, I was thinking of putting a smaller pair of speakers on stands, on the table, at the back, along with a 27" monitor, the screen would be far enough back not to get in the way, and I would still be able to see it. Problem with this is that it's very much a "computer workstation" style set-up, and I was hoping to make more use of a bigger room, and have bigger monitors.
Laying things flat doesn't sound like it's going to be any good, or a high working position, I get terrible neck ache when having to look down at screens, It really is disabling, it's that bad. I'm fine however when things are either right in front of me, or higher. There's no point in really moving into the bigger room if I don't make the most of the space, I may as well stay in the bedroom, and try and move things around to achieve the triangle. The extra space though would be so useful, as I want to have a separate keyboard area, and a place for my modular, which I don't have at the moment.
I'll sort something out, and when this is all done I'll post some pictures, I'm sure a lot of you think I'm in cloud cuckoo land imagining all is, but it has taken a long time to get my budget sorted out, and it's been such a wind up, not only for some of you guys I'm sure, but mainly for me !
When it does all get sorted it's going to seem like I'm living someone else's life !

MouseGarden.
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> General Gear Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4  Next [all]
Page 1 of 4
Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group