MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index
 FAQ & Terms of UseFAQ & Terms Of Use   Wiggler RadioMW Radio   Muff Wiggler TwitterTwitter   Support the site @ PatreonPatreon 
 SearchSearch   RegisterSign up   Log inLog in 
WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

CAD software?
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Music Tech DIY Goto page 1, 2  Next [all]
Author CAD software?
QuantumMechanakillWave
What is everyone's favorite CAD software, and why?
Altitude909
Draftsight. Free and pretty much exactly what autocad was before autodesk went all batshit crazy. Pure and simple 2D
QuantumMechanakillWave
Cool! I will check it out!

w00t
martimous
I use AutoSketch 9 from Autodesk. It's reasonably priced, and does everything I've thrown at it. Multiple layers, auto dimensioning, templates, etc....
QuantumMechanakillWave
^Cool! I'll check it out!^
dshay
Creo Elements Direct - Express -free edition.

I took a class to learn Solidworks and I prefer Creo Elements Direct. It's a dynamic model where you can push and shove and tweak on the fly.

I find Solidworks historical based modeling too rigid, in a sense you have to have the part pre-designed in your mind before you start with the machining processes in the back of your mind.

One limitation of Creo Elements Direct -Express is import/export file compatiability, it's limited. I get around this by exporting STLs and finding free tools that can convert STLs to Autocad /IGES/STEP compatible formats if I need to send the design somewhere to be fabbed.
Grumskiz
I really like using openscad. It's free and open source, but really different from other CAD programs in that you don't ever draw anything.
Instead you use a scripting language with syntax similar to C to define various geometric shapes and then use different mathematical operations on them. Of course you can easily define your own functions and modules, so anything you make can be reused.
Since computer science is my field this feels great to me.
Another advantage is that one can easily set up parameters that you can adjust on the fly.
For example:
I have a generic front panel design file for my eurorack synth. Every panel I design starts with it. It uses a constant called HP. When I change it, not only the panel size changes, but also the placement of the screw holes, because they are also bound to the same constant.

Another fun thing about the scripting language is that it supports recursion. You can do some real funky things with it smile

If you enjoy programming I'd say give it a try!
gruvsyco
dshay wrote:
Creo Elements Direct - Express -free edition.

I took a class to learn Solidworks and I prefer Creo Elements Direct. It's a dynamic model where you can push and shove and tweak on the fly.

I find Solidworks historical based modeling too rigid, in a sense you have to have the part pre-designed in your mind before you start with the machining processes in the back of your mind.

One limitation of Creo Elements Direct -Express is import/export file compatiability, it's limited. I get around this by exporting STLs and finding free tools that can convert STLs to Autocad /IGES/STEP compatible formats if I need to send the design somewhere to be fabbed.


You should really try Autodesk Fusion 360 if you haven't yet.

Quote:
Free for students, enthusiasts, hobbyists, and startups
Full use of Fusion 360 for as long as you need it


I used Draftsight for quite a while (AutoCAD user since 2.5) but since I've migrated to parametric modeling I don't really use the 2D stuff much.

This last week, I've been using Inkscape for some panel design, mostly to see if I could import it into Front Panel Designer.

I've been investigating Schematic/PCB CAD lately. Eagle seems to be the standard most people use I didn't care much for it. I like DipTrace quite a bit but the limitations are a drawback and it's pricey to get in. Today I'm trying out 123D Circuits and PCB WebDesigner. I'd still like to try KiCAD out as well.
thx2112
Draftsight if sending stuff out. Inkscape for quick stuff.
neil.johnson
I have a page here that might be of interest:
http://www.milton.arachsys.com/nj71/index.php?menu=2&submenu=7

Neil
indigoid
I used QCAD Professional to design my DIY Euro case parts. Though sometimes I'll use the Inkscape "tabbed box maker" extension to create the basics of a box and then do everything else (mounting holes, apertures for power entry, etc) in QCAD.

I also use Front Panel Designer a lot since its built-in goo for Schroff panels is so damned convenient, and also because the DXF files it exports are digested so reliably in the LaserCAD software I use to drive the laser cutter. LaserCAD's DXF import is rather buggy, to put it mildly, so this aspect of FPD is a godsend.

And for Google's sake: if you're having trouble exporting DXF from QCAD to import into LaserCAD, export as AutoCAD R15/2000 or older. Took me a while to discover that. LaserCAD should then actually import without crashing.
Jarno
I have the full version of Creo/ Windchill on my work laptop (I have a mechanical engineering background), so I usually use that, but the learning curve is pretty steep.

For 2d stuff, I used to use AutoCad (obviously), but I no longer have it on my laptop. I do have Adobe Illustrator, and I love it to bits, great for sketches and proposals for drawings etc (modify PDF).
martimous
Is there anybody else here that has checked out Alibre for 3d design and fab? They had a pretty nice intro price a while back, but I'm really loathe to start dinking around with some new UI. So far, I haven't found any reason to give up my AutoSketch.
revtor
Are you looking for software? What do you want to use it for?

for 3-D mech tech stuff checkout Onshape. Web based (Don't need mega pc to run)
FREE user registration. (Up to 5 projects)
designed by Ex-Solidwork programmers.
Updated "behind the scenes" , never worry about installing etc etc.
Drawings "blueprints" output coming soon.
No sheet metal specific tools yet.

~Steve
QuantumMechanakillWave
revtor wrote:
Are you looking for software? What do you want to use it for?

for 3-D mech tech stuff checkout Onshape. Web based (Don't need mega pc to run)
FREE user registration. (Up to 5 projects)
designed by Ex-Solidwork programmers.
Updated "behind the scenes" , never worry about installing etc etc.
Drawings "blueprints" output coming soon.
No sheet metal specific tools yet.

~Steve


I wanting to do front panel/enclosure design for modules that I am creating. Considering my graphics background, I should prob stick to Adobe illustrator. Is their any reason that I should consider doing otherwise for front panel design?

Thanks everyone for all of the responses!
j9k
I like Solidworks. Mostly because if you set up your models correctly any changes you make later will also make the rest of the model update as well. I also like how the 2d sketch works within a 3d environment.
indigoid
QuantumMechanakillWave wrote:
I wanting to do front panel/enclosure design for modules that I am creating. Considering my graphics background, I should prob stick to Adobe illustrator. Is their any reason that I should consider doing otherwise for front panel design?


Possibly, yes. I'm not familiar with Illustrator so this is only speculation, but you do need to be confident of placement and spacing. Inkscape is spectacularly awful in this regard. Hopefully Illustrator is better.

If I was going to do fancy panel graphics I'd most likely do the hole-placement stuff in Front Panel Designer or QCAD, then export DXF and load in Illustrator or similar to do the fancy graphics bits.
whoop_john
Computer aided design covers a vast area of usage. It all depends what you are trying to design and why. And whether you need to draw in 2D or 3D or a combination of the two.

There is also a fundamental different way of working if you intend to use Catmull Clark subdivision surfaces such as are used to describe car bodies and similar complex curved surfaces - resolution independent - or whether conventional hard polygon modelling will do.

I use Silo for pure sculptural freeform 3D 'box' modelling that will be subdivided. It has a lot of features for the price, very fast redraw and good UV mapping tools.

For modelling that needs to end up as extremely photo-realistic renderings I like to use Strata 3D CX. It can import most 2D and 3D formats, plus vector PDF data and for texturing it can import or refer to external layered photoshop files. It works well with 2D Postscript drawing packages. The animation features are reasonably good, but if you need to go for features such as bones and rigging, flowing hair, running water and true physics it would not be my first choice, although some of this can be done in Strata.

If you are after purely technical engineering 3D capabilities you would go with something like autocad, inventor or the hideously expensive solidworks.

With any 3D CAD program there is a level of complexity that usually means a steep learning curve and casual use might not be worth the effort. Some people are better than others at visualising and navigating in 3D space - it's a temperament thing.
Jalopy
great thread, lots of resources.

came here to link to my other q and to cross pollinate threads.

See other thread here

Hoping to find a way to use Autocad via illicit channels. If anybody has the plug it is likely you guys...

Also wondering if there is a community location for sharing project info / files as well... would be a valuable community resource imo
slow_riot
I can recommend FreeCAD with some of the add ons like fasteners, sheet metal for folds. It's probably a bit clunky and requires some odds ways of working. But it worked to draw up the chassis for this, and have it folded and cut by a pro assembly shop.

https://aether-machine.com/oscilloplasm/

If you're a "circuit" guy, like me, it's worth getting a design engineer to check your work first for manufacturability first.
devinw1
I'm a Solidworks guy, but mostly because I've been using it professionally for 15 years or so. It has gotten pretty good though and is quite powerful/easy to use.
Altitude909
devinw1 wrote:
I'm a Solidworks guy, but mostly because I've been using it professionally for 15 years or so. It has gotten pretty good though and is quite powerful/easy to use.


Yeah, and 7 grand a seat..
indigoid
Jalopy wrote:
Hoping to find a way to use Autocad via illicit channels. If anybody has the plug it is likely you guys...


This is a totally inappropriate forum for your topic.

If someone were to provide something like that here, it would be placing the whole MuffWiggler forum at risk. I suspect you knew this already, and simply didn't give a single fuck and posted anyway. Pretty poor form.
l3v3l6
Autodesk Fusion 360 is free for startups, small businesses and hobbyist. I use it because is integrates directly with Eagle.
Jalopy
l3v3l6, that is a smoking hot tip. While it is only a temporary fix, a year is a long time and at least I can get some of these ideas out of my gourd...

Altitude909 wrote:
devinw1 wrote:
I'm a Solidworks guy, but mostly because I've been using it professionally for 15 years or so. It has gotten pretty good though and is quite powerful/easy to use.


Yeah, and 7 grand a seat..


exactly my barrier for entry...

I have used it in a professional setting and am proficient but to find a copy to put on my personal computer is apparently an effort I will need to take a loan out for... or find those weird russian and chinese websites...

indigoid The internet was created as a tool to help people come together and communicate ideas and techniques. It is especially useful when people can help others in unconventional ways. You should try it sometime.
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Music Tech DIY Goto page 1, 2  Next [all]
Page 1 of 2
Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group