MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index
 FAQ & Terms of UseFAQ & Terms Of Use   Wiggler RadioMW Radio   Muff Wiggler TwitterTwitter   Support the site @ PatreonPatreon 
 SearchSearch   RegisterSign up   Log inLog in 
WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

Why does it feel cheap and boring making beats on iPad!?
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Music Software Goto page 1, 2  Next [all]
Author Why does it feel cheap and boring making beats on iPad!?
The Space Disco
I have all the dope apps and synths, I LOVE Korg Gadget, Moog Model 15 and everything, but still... I would be happier with an op1 from teenage engineering even thou the possibilities is probably bigger in Korg Gadget.

I remember when I got my first iPhone 4 and bought beatmaker2 I was amazed...

Maybe I just need a good controller!? But I do have a few... and I even have a pretty dope sound card to the iPad... still that feeling... and I keep on wonder why?

Maybe it's simply just the -screen-. How do you tackle this? And how do you use your iPad creatively in your production?
The Space Disco
Btw, I made a template so I can control my akai Mpc 1000 with my iPad using midi to USB cable, it works dope! This because one arrow button on my Mpc kinda broken. [/img]
shamann
There's a book that might offer some insight:
http://www.publicaffairsbooks.com/book/hardcover/the-revenge-of-analog  /9781610395717

There's a satisfaction in dealing with something whole/physical/purpose-built. Not always, of course, but especially tasks that are intended to be pleasurable, the feedback a physical thing offers is rewarding for our monkey brains.

Tapping glass and connecting disparate parts can be super-efficient and ever up to the task, but the experience can also have its limits.
The Space Disco
I need that book!

Yeah, I've bee thinking it could have been an hardware vs software thing, but then again, I never feel bored mouse clicking in renoise, or messing around with Ableton, of course the hardware gear connected to these platforms plays a huge role.

I think stroke machine for iPad was a hit, specially cause no one uses it... wish it had Ableton link... and DM2 kinda cool those few times I get by that melancholic feeling... I. Getting the feeling most people, specially you modular heads are not concerned about this and really uses the iPad in many creative ways. I bought zMors modular... cause I love Reaktor 6 but I've patched like once or twice in it only... and can't understand why?
shamann
Outcomes can also be a factor. If you really like the music your making with whatever you use, goes a long way to making you feel connected with it.
dpcoffin
I don't know why I agree, but for whatever reason, I can't get interested in the sound-making apps (of which I have many!) compared to my computer plugins and working in Logic or Live. But I DO really like using MIDI apps on the iPad connected to the computer and recording in a DAW. My favorite so far is Different Drummer, but there are certainly others, which provides a fascinating and very responsive touchable alternative to controlling all the things I'm so used to playing on my computer with the mouse and keyboard. I connect via MusicIO, which supposedly can also put the audio apps "inside" Logic et al., but so far that feels sort of fragile. Haven't either yet dipped into Lemur, TouchOSC, etc. but Diff Drummer is a definite thrill, here at least.
CF3
I'm in the same boat. Just can't bring myself to make music on an ipad. Lots of INCREDIBLE apps out there, of which I have many. It just doesn't do it for me though....no matter what. Part of it is I have a rather nice hardware set up with everything I pretty much want. I also have a well equipped DAW environment on my studio computer. I think one thing is I just don't like touchscreens. Tapping on glass isn't for me. I do use the ipad for manipulating samples then exporting the wav files to either a hardware sampler or back to my DAW.

That said my favs:

SoundScaper
Grain Science
Samplr
Virtual ANS
Audulus
Sector
thispoison
Lifestyle can be a huge factor.

I started flying weekly for work around 5 years ago, and being able to make music anywhere suddenly made the iPad approach click.

Inflight and hotel room creativity without carrying too much stuff was/is great.

Still third choice to Mac/Logic/Plugins which is second choice to hardware at home.

All have a place?
bobbylandry
It's definitely touch screen stuff that kills it for me. And I wish it didn't cause there's lots of great stuff. Maybe it's age or any number of other psychological things I don't understand well enough but I can't get into it. I'm 31 and grew up with computers from a young age, and studied computer engineering in college, so it isn't some need for analog or WYSIWYS or purpose built stuff I don't think. Maybe I'm just too late for the idea of a single flat screen being your does everything interface to the world.
knifey
Have you checked out Patterning? Drum machine extroardinaire, genius interface (it's very easy to learn). Sends out MIDI gate and CC per track via USB cable, can import your own samples, comes with tones of great kits. You can save step length, direction, beat resolution PER pattern. Song mode, audio export, etc etc. Probably the most flexible drum machine hardware or software.
FearKonstruktor
I think it's matter of feeling as well. It's not so "live" when you are using iPad to make something serious, but it's ok to do a quick sketch on the go.
It's cool to use it as a controller and I also really love Samplr.

knifey, thank you so much for the info, I've checked an app page and it looks really amazing. I will check it out today!
gis_sweden
Interesting. Yes why. I have used Samplr, and other apps. Great fun and great
result. But it it feels coold. Partly because the outcome of Samplr tends to be
coold, scary, soundscapes. Might be me…

Before I turned to modular I used hardware samplers. It felt better to use them
compared with using the iPad. I have often thought of this, but can’t explain
why. Theory 1: The hands-on factor is important for me. Theory 2: I’m part of a
community using and discussing, for example, samplers.

The answer is probably a combination of these.

Well, I sold my samplers and other gear and started with modular synth. Have
not made any music with iPad since.
What about making music with a DAW? I only got Audacity in my computer.
Dead Banana
colossal
I also have a ton of iPad apps. The one I have bonded this most with is TNR-i (Tenori On) its definitely one of the least featured apps but feels great to use.

There is something about the way this stuff is wrote that makes it gel with the user. Maybe all the mega feature apps just don't have that magic fairy dust?

Keen to try Patterning though, looks great.
ngarjuna
Patterning has become my go to drum machine. There's just nothing like that interface. And that, to me, is what's missing in 99% of the apps so far: purpose driven interfaces. Mostly apps just conform to the touch surface because that's the surface they've got to work with; and then litter it with buttons, knobs and stuff that has little to do with touch interfaces. Same with Samplr, I think a lot of why I love using it so much is that the interface feels so natural with the controls. But I hate piano keyboards on my iPad; and knobs in general have been pretty hit or miss (more miss).

So we may just need to give designers some time to reorient.
knifey
My pleasure. I never got very much into iPad music-making, but am planning to use Patterning with my Eurorack set up this weekend.

I do think multi-touch surfaces do have a lot of potential as a musical instrument interface. It combines with visual advantages of a large-screen GUI with a controller interface, and still has the ability to use external hardware controllers.
The Space Disco
Yes, patterning is great, and the kits that comes with it. Totally love the interface... more stuff like that. I use patterning when I fool around with hardware synths or If I need dope drums when I'm practicing piano.

Nice thoughts all, guess I'm not alone.
dpcoffin
ngarjuna wrote:
…purpose driven interfaces…

I hate piano keyboards on my iPad; and knobs in general have been pretty hit or miss (more miss).


THIS…and this is also why I like Diff Drummer so well, esp. the "Zen" interface: basically a sequencer with spinning and slider-based touch controls to mold the MIDI note stream. Check it out…
stk
knifey wrote:
Have you checked out Patterning? .


Patterning is a lot of fun, one of the few iPad apps I've found to be inspiring in use.

Although I'm mostly with the other touchscreen sceptics.

My theory is that people who work a lot with hardware develop an expectation for muscle memory, and interface feedback, that a flat glass screen does not provide. On a tablet, there is no nonvisual context.

However on a dedicated buttons/sliders/knobs device, I believe that your hands navigate at least partially by context. If I brush my hand down a mixer I am very familiar with, I can use it without sight. I think this holds the potential for an intimate artistic relationship with a piece of equipment. That is something a touch app cannot offer.

Mutability is as disempowering as it is empowering.

Cheers
shred
Patterning is a must have. Samplr too. Both of those are extremely powerful in completely different ways. I enjoy Sunrizer for a pretty straightforward poly synth but it's a bit cold sounding at times.

Came across Neo-Soul Keys recently which is a free app but there are lots of upgrade options, but you can sample each one. Really killer Rhodes and electric piano sounds.

Just picked up Waldorf Nave and I love it. So much that I'm seriously contemplating a midi keyboard with encoders just to draw it out into the physical realm somewhat. If it was an actual hardware synth it would be many thousands of dollars
rokmodular
Samplr is a fantastic app, and anything but boring. Rockin' Banana!
Escapegoat
Didn't click with anything on the iPad until I got Modstep. Absolutely love it.
babybeluga
shamann wrote:
There's a book that might offer some insight:
http://www.publicaffairsbooks.com/book/hardcover/the-revenge-of-analog  /9781610395717

There's a satisfaction in dealing with something whole/physical/purpose-built. Not always, of course, but especially tasks that are intended to be pleasurable, the feedback a physical thing offers is rewarding for our monkey brains.

Tapping glass and connecting disparate parts can be super-efficient and ever up to the task, but the experience can also have its limits.


Thank you for the tip on this book!!
Riggar
In the end - is it a serious tool for music? You want it to be but ....
kf6gpe
It's a really interesting question to me, especially because right now I'm actually finding I'm doing _more_ on the iPad than the OP-1. I love my OP-1, and travel with it, actually. But in the last couple weeks I've really been caught up with Korg Gadget. I haven't connected the two yet --- planning on doing so today; just picked up a camera connect thingy for that this week.

I will say I've tried a lot of iPad apps, and found very few to be very satisfying for very long. Some of it I think are the apps, some of it may be me. And I think I agree with others about a lot of it being the physicality --- having real knobs and keys definitely helps.
the tone ranger
I find it really easy to start tracks with Korg Gadget but feel I have to bounce everything out and finish it in my DAW, often adding or replacing parts with analogue synths. What I really like about the iPad is it gives me an opportunity to make music in bed when I'm too tired to go in the studio. I'd be a lot less productive without it but it's definitely not my first choice when I've got a whole day planned for music.
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Music Software Goto page 1, 2  Next [all]
Page 1 of 2
Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group