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WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

The 2018 Show Us Your DIY Builds Thread
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Music Tech DIY Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 14, 15, 16 ... 24, 25, 26  Next [all]
Author The 2018 Show Us Your DIY Builds Thread
neutronarmy
Thank you for documenting some of your process Rex Coil 7. After following stompbox building for quite some time, you seem to have your own unique workflow that produces some really amazing results.

I do have one technical question: I see that you use plastic standoffs. I've always been afraid to use them in a stompbox fearing that the vibration associated with the act of switching would wear away the adhesive over time. Any suggestions/input as longevity seems to have been your goal? Beautiful work!
Moog$FooL$
wowies Mr. RC7..... thanks for that info. about powder coating.
for some reason, i actually thought it could be done simply at home.

LOLlers... i'm so silly!! very frustrating very frustrating very frustrating
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
Moog$FooL$ wrote:
wowies Mr. RC7..... thanks for that info. about powder coating.
for some reason, i actually thought it could be done simply at home.

LOLlers... i'm so silly!! very frustrating very frustrating very frustrating


Yeah, you are pretty fuckin' silly. MY ASS IS BLEEDING
Rex Coil 7
neutronarmy wrote:
Thank you for documenting some of your process Rex Coil 7. After following stompbox building for quite some time, you seem to have your own unique workflow that produces some really amazing results.

I do have one technical question: I see that you use plastic standoffs. I've always been afraid to use them in a stompbox fearing that the vibration associated with the act of switching would wear away the adhesive over time. Any suggestions/input as longevity seems to have been your goal? Beautiful work!
Thank you for your observations and compliments.

If I have one thing I would change on them, it would be using metal standoffs instead of nylon stanchions. I have seen some really old stompboxes that used the nylon stands that held their ground. I figured if old adhesive worked on boxes made in the 1970s, modern adhesives would do.

There are always "I would ruther" things with anything we do. In my project synth, I wish I would have used stainless steel t-nuts rather than the zinc plated steel ones which I used instead.

Not using metal standoffs in my pedals was a choice I made influenced by some forum feedback in 2006. As it was, there were a lot of guitar players that didn't like the fact the I built my pedals "upside down", because they felt the visible screws "fuddup the lines" (the design lines of the box). Using metal standoffs would have put more visible screws on the panels, so I opted to use the extremely popular nylon adhesive backed standoffs.

Additionally, once the adhesive is really ~seated~ and has had time to settle in, removing those standoffs is a task!!! It usually tears apart with some of it attached to the standoff, and some of it attached to the enclosure. But it takes some doing to remove them without destroying the standoff. I have to use a screwdriver, and wriggle it under the nylon base, then pry the standoff from the enclosure. This normally messes up the standoff. That adhesive is pretty tough stuff. At least the standoffs I used had adhesive that was that way, I can't speak for all of them, however. Perhaps buy a small handful of them, test them out so you can make your own informed conclusions. If I recall they don't cost very much.

My oldest ones were made in 2005 (they're my own pedals). The standoffs are still holding up fine, even being 13 years old. Some of which being exposed to ambient temps exceeding 130f degrees (they're stored in my shop, which easily hits temps that high during our summers here). While I cannot speak for all conditions of use, I'm fairly at ease with them in many situations.

I made a choice, I have to live with it.

Sometimes you must face compromises that you don't agree with.

Unfortunately, this is a concept that many people these days don't have any patience for.

seriously, i just don't get it
Rex Coil 7
Moog$FooL$ wrote:
wowies Mr. RC7..... thanks for that info. about powder coating.
for some reason, i actually thought it could be done simply at home.

LOLlers... i'm so silly!! very frustrating very frustrating very frustrating
Well, no ... DIYing powder coating is actually done. I made the choice to have that local shop do them for me for a few reasons.

** I had a several thousand dollar credit owed to me by that shop from some previous dealings, this was a good way to recoup that credit (the shop owner felt the same way).

** The burden of "re-dos" was placed on them, not me. Panels must be bead blasted before being powdercoated if done properly. This is to create "tooth" on the metal surface for the powder to really adhere well. After that, the powder is applied, the panel is baked, and once cooled the job is inspected. If there is a problem, the shop was responsible for redoing the job (bubbled surface, blemishes, rough surface, crap/garbage that wasn't cleaned out of the lettering well enough which contaminated the process and created "foam" inside of the lettering ... and so on). I've already detailed what it takes to remove powdercoating and prepare the part for another try at it ... it's a hassle!

Not only all of that, while a given batch of panels was at the powder shop, that produced time for me to do other things ......

**ordering more parts
**checking in received parts orders
**marketing (always ceaselessly marketing at least one hour every day in the forums, answering questions and promoting new models and options)
**pre-testing each single PCB component and verifying their values (caps, resistors, pots, switches)
**loading the build boards with the pots, resistors, caps, LEDs, etc with the correct values corresponding to build diagrams (resistor "R1" placed on slot "1" of the parts board to correspond with build sheets for a given circuit or pedal and so on)
**wiring/doing the lead dressing on panels that didn't need powdercoating
**doing the paint filled lettering and wet sanding the panels
**populating PCBs for panels that were at the powder shop
**machining the marker dots on all of the knobs
**drilling enclosures/installing jacks and pre-wiring the lower half of the enclosures
**making Tone Plugs
**designing the wiring and other issues for custom builds
**designing new PCBs
**updating my website (which was done 2 or 3 times per week)
**boxing and taking boxes to the shipping company
**testing out completed units (I actually played my guitar with the pedals to prove their operation ... 30 minutes minimum)
**emailing tracking numbers
**corresponding with customers as well as potential customers via emails .... and so on.

I often fell asleep in the shop, woke up and went right back to work.

So having the powder coating done by a local shop was like doubling my labor hours available to make pedals (and everything that went with selling them).

But if someone just wants to powder coat small batches, or onesey twosey small bit work, doing it at home is something that is actually a thing!

My situation was as close to mass producing them as could be with just a one person operation. I was catering to a lot of customers, and I wanted my products to look as sharp as possible. I didn't want to hassle with re-dos or problems if I didn't have to.

One Other Regret:


The polished and semi-polished models have absolutely no clear coating or otherwise protective material on the finished surface. When I spent a few hours sanding/wet sanding the hard crust from the enclosure covers I had removed the layer of protective oxidation. On a few of the polished/semi-polished ones I've seen a spotty/blemished oxidation form on the surface making the pedal look like ASS. These seem to be limited to ones used in humid areas or areas with wet climates. Out here in the southwest (the northern tip of the Sonora Desert) we get less than one inch of rain per year. The finish holds up just fine out here in "the dirt". But in more humid/wet/snowy areas of the world, the polished ones don't hold up as well.

Given the method used to do infilled lettering, coupled with the fact that the high amount of torque on the foot switch nut (which is a much thicker nut than the footswitch is supplied with) cracked any clear coat put on the polished panels, I had to go with no clear coat.

The MilSpec O.D. Green powder coating has turned out to be the most durable ... that stuff is tough as the Hubs Of Hell! Still looks fresh after years of use.

So, the nylon standoffs, and the exposed polished surfaces are two things that could have been done some other way.

Here comes those compromises staring me in the face again!

thumbs up
Peake
Rex Coil 7 wrote:





I'm always in love with everything people post here, often there are jaw-droppingly good bits, but I've gotta say this is just brutally fantastic.
Isaiah
Rex Coil 7
Excellent read, thanks for sharing.
Can I suggest that you start a separate thread on the subject?
It’s worthy of its own thread (after 2018 when this thread is replaced, if someone wants to discuss stamping and finishing they’d have to bump a thread that is largely irrelevant to the topic they want to discuss).
We’re up to 15 pages already and only a third of the way through the year, so you can see how it could get messy!
Rex Coil 7
Isaiah wrote:
Rex Coil 7
Excellent read, thanks for sharing.
Can I suggest that you start a separate thread on the subject?
It’s worthy of its own thread (after 2018 when this thread is replaced, if someone wants to discuss stamping and finishing they’d have to bump a thread that is largely irrelevant to the topic they want to discuss).
We’re up to 15 pages already and only a third of the way through the year, so you can see how it could get messy!
You're absolutely correct. There actually is a thread that forum boss *sduck started that is exclusively about these old things.

Link = https://www.muffwiggler.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=197089&highlight=

I didn't have any idea that a few pictures of hand stamping were going to run away with the thread. I have actually become a bit self conscious about all of the attention in this one! It's why I sortof stopped replying to the wonderful and generous posts regarding my previous efforts ... kindof a double edged sword (I don't want those that have gone out of their way to offer props to think I'm ungrateful, and yet ... as I said a few posts back .. I never intended to ~run this thread over with a bulldozer~ either).

What I could do is to copy the handstamping info to the ~farndurk~ thread that *sduck started, and maybe trim these existing posts down (??). And perhaps replace the posts with all of the pictures with a reference to the linked dedicated thread. (??)

In any case .... there's the link to the dedicated thread. It's not in the DIY subforum, it is in the guitar/bass subforum. Shoot ... that's not really appropriate either since this information covers some pretty heavy DIY techniques.

Suggestions?

Thanks to everyone that shared appreciation for my efforts. I honestly do appreciate the uplifting comments.

At this point, it's pretty clear to me that there are people out there that would appreciate the how-tos of some of the methods I found useful ... clearly they are applicable to building synth modules. I just need to work out the best way/place to move all of this too.

Again, thank you.

Brian.

EDIT: Starting a letter stamping thread in the DIY subforum seems like the best solution (well, at this moment it does ... it may not seem like the best idea fifteen minutes from now!) d'oh!

lol

thinking .... thinking .... hmmm.....
bmoren
3x Nearness ready to go!

Rex Coil 7
bmoren wrote:
3x Nearness ready to go!

Are those buffered mults?
flts
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
EDIT: Starting a letter stamping thread in the DIY subforum seems like the best solution (well, at this moment it does ... it may not seem like the best idea fifteen minutes from now!) d'oh!


I think it still does sound like a good idea smile No need to edit the discussions / post in this thread, just start a new one with the same information you shared
(ie. your thorough reply to my post at least!) so people can easily find the info and discuss about it!
bmoren
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
Are those buffered mults?


https://www.modulargrid.net/e/other-unknown-nearness-black-and-gold-pa nel
Rex Coil 7
bmoren wrote:
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
Are those buffered mults?


https://www.modulargrid.net/e/other-unknown-nearness-black-and-gold-pa nel


http://www.quickmeme.com/img/58/589710766aca36b9ab0406dcb804042b8019a7 0c398ca5845c79bda079ead085.jpg

razz
bmoren
Rex Coil 7 wrote:

http://www.quickmeme.com/img/58/589710766aca36b9ab0406dcb804042b8019a7 0c398ca5845c79bda079ead085.jpg

razz


Did you read the description on modular grid? It's got a link out to the original thread on lines with the whole development process and to the github....

re-posting here since seriously, i just don't get it

Quote:
The idea is to have some number of input jacks (seven, here) mixed down to two output jacks, with each input representing a fixed pan position somewhere between the two extremes represented by the outputs. Plug a signal into the topmost input to send it entirely to the top output, the middle one to send it equally to both, etc.

From this discussion on lines:
https://llllllll.co/t/prototyping-nearness-a-minimal-panning-mixer-mod ule/8330

https://github.com/sarnesjo/nearness
pinoaffe
I don't know whether this already qualifies as a "build",
but i made a bunch of pcb layouts -
for "the fastest envelope in the west" by rene schmitz (uses the 7555),
for a dual version of synthmonger's 40106 VCO,
and for a pretty basic 4017-based sequencer circuit i "designed" myself.
The sequencer pcbs will be interlinkable, to allow for more steps / more channels,
and have a switch per step to either mute, reset or voice at that step.
It should output both gate and normal output per channel.

The pcbs fit on a single 10x10cm board together, so ordering from china should be pretty cheap (i'll just have to saw them myself).
I'll probably fill another 10x10 board with some other circuits, have not yet decided which circuits.
I might ask the creators for permission to post the pcb files online, but would like to first test em






is there anything obviously wrong about my layouts?
Rex Coil 7
bmoren wrote:
Rex Coil 7 wrote:

http://www.quickmeme.com/img/58/589710766aca36b9ab0406dcb804042b8019a7 0c398ca5845c79bda079ead085.jpg

razz


Did you read the description on modular grid? It's got a link out to the original thread on lines with the whole development process and to the github....

re-posting here since seriously, i just don't get it

Quote:
The idea is to have some number of input jacks (seven, here) mixed down to two output jacks, with each input representing a fixed pan position somewhere between the two extremes represented by the outputs. Plug a signal into the topmost input to send it entirely to the top output, the middle one to send it equally to both, etc.

From this discussion on lines:
https://llllllll.co/t/prototyping-nearness-a-minimal-panning-mixer-mod ule/8330

https://github.com/sarnesjo/nearness
Thanks, I think my attempt at humor was misdirected. ~Yes~ I did see and read the link. Thank you for the more in depth explanation, as well.

Seems like a useful module. cool
XPump
1 Mankato ...2 Mankato ...

Seem like every thing took a long time to get this built (years!)
...it was a very long time to get the PCBs fm MagicSmoke and a snafu in my order allowed me to get and add'l Mankato TH-201.

anyway - here is my Dual Mankato - nothing fancy to look at but these VCF's really sound great. I used concentric potentiometers for the coarse/fine


fitzgreyve
pinoaffe wrote:
(i'll just have to saw them myself).


Most PCB fab houses will do V-groove, but they'll probably charge you a premium as these are two different designs.

Don't saw (FR4 dust is not nice) - carefully score both sides using a craft knife and steel rule, then they will snap relatively easily along the score line.
Pav
screenshot:



recommend thin fingers, thin jack plugs and thin knobs ..its a tad tight when saw and cv patched for instance. Great sound from CEM3340 (W)

30 seconds of a test of the positive edge hard sync + triangle out
https://youtu.be/wjEY6U3gx2U
bmoren
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
Thanks, I think my attempt at humor was misdirected. ~Yes~ I did see and read the link. Thank you for the more in depth explanation, as well.

Seems like a useful module. cool


d'oh! hihi

It's an awesome module, really cant recommend it enough it makes stereo work so so simple its amazing. It's especially great to pair up with rings, clouds, or other modules that have stereo out. I think some absolute crazy things could happen with a sequential gate routing the stereo field.
bmoren
Just put this together and I must say that most people start with a mult as a beginner project, but I'm going to start recommending bus boards... They are dead simple, introduce you to a variety of components. and have lots of latitude, and + for true beginners (beginning their system) this is a total no-brainier project to build a PSU (trogotronic has no mains exposed) or to build a board to replace the flying cables from a 4ms or a uZeus

Rex Coil 7
bmoren wrote:
Just put this together and I must say that most people start with a mult as a beginner project, but I'm going to start recommending bus boards... They are dead simple, introduce you to a variety of components. and have lots of latitude, and + for true beginners (beginning their system) this is a total no-brainier project to build a PSU (trogotronic has no mains exposed) or to build a board to replace the flying cables from a 4ms or a uZeus

I think that is an EXCELLENT suggestion! You are absolutely correct ... it could actually suit beginners and become a useful step towards getting their new synth on line.

Well done!

thumbs up
GilgaFrank
Found the schematic of the Buchla 292 LPG, made a PCB, nearly got it right. Version 2 will be the money shot, this one's full of bodge wires at the back where I missed tracks off. Sounds incredible though!

mome rath
GilgaFrank wrote:
Found the schematic of the Buchla 292 LPG, made a PCB, nearly got it right. Version 2 will be the money shot, this one's full of bodge wires at the back where I missed tracks off. Sounds incredible though!


nice work!
soup
toppobrillo 281/2 in frac...




It's peanut butter jelly time!
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