MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index
 FAQ & Terms of UseFAQ & Terms Of Use   Wiggler RadioMW Radio   Muff Wiggler TwitterTwitter   Support the site @ PatreonPatreon 
 SearchSearch   RegisterSign up   Log inLog in 
WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

The 2018 Show Us Your DIY Builds Thread
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Music Tech DIY  
Author The 2018 Show Us Your DIY Builds Thread
sduck
It's time! Sorry, nothing from me currently, I'm in the middle of several large things. Hopefully something to show soon...
search64
Let's kick this off then...

BOOM!
Jbrooks_il
Mmm, mm, m!
Picard
A straightforward MIDI splitter for small jam sessions.
40106-based and internal power supply - no forgettable wall wart!
Pretty custom 3D printed case.
psykon
First build of 2018. Starting small, but it's my first smd build smile




Next up: Ripples. ...and this backlog...



MY ASS IS BLEEDING
Rex Coil 7
search64 wrote:
Let's kick this off then...

BOOM!
Wanna give any of the readers some idea what this is? Or does it just go "BOOM!" ? (seems like a lot of effort for something that only goes ~boom~).
batchas
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
Wanna give any of the readers some idea what this is? Or does it just go "BOOM!" ? (seems like a lot of effort for something that only goes ~boom~).

O+C = ornament & crime
search64
Seeing as Ornament & Crime is so popular right now, I thought everyone would know what it is. My mistake!

So yeah, it's sort of a Swiss army knife utility module, based on a Teensy processor. Shift Register, Turing Machines, four separate quantizers, quadrature LFO... that sort of thing.
the bad producer
Oh bugger, have we started this year already zombie I still have lots from last year Dead Banana

Rex Coil 7
the bad producer wrote:
Oh bugger, have we started this year already zombie I still have lots from last year Dead Banana
Ugh ....

.... ain't that a bitch.
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
I built something.

This is a eurorack-format hex VC crossfader, which I call the HeXFader. This was a "one-off" build for a fellow wiggler. I completely redesigned my VC Xfader circuit for this build (and other applications) so that I can now get two crossfaders out of a single 2164 chip. Hence, each of the three PCBs attached to the panel PCB contains two crossfader circuits. The gain-limiting circuitry is identical to that on the (now discontinued) Intellijel uFade. A new feature of these new Xfaders is that the B input is normalled to the inverse of the A input for ring-modulation purposes. Setting the CV pot to 50% (12:00) gives unclipped unity gain for ideal ring mod.

I had to learn how to mill slots in sheet metal for this build, using my drill press. It wasn't that hard (once I got the drill table tight enough that it wouldn't move and cause my slot to veer off course)! I got it all right the first time. I actually had three panel blanks cut, but only needed one. It turns out that the mounting slots are a little wide (I used a single 1/8" end-mill for all the slots). If I do any more eurorack modules, I'll buy a slightly smaller end-mill for the mounting slots. The customer may need to use washers.

If anyone wants one of these, please let me know. I might actually be persuaded to build another one (but it'll cost ya!). I worked on this one for a month, so I'd like to build another one if only to put all that experience to use.



Rex Coil 7
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
I built something.
Yea! ... Boy I'll say you did! Hot Damn that thing looks wonderful.

Now I can see everything that you were frettin' over all the way through this one Dave. The way some of the AMP (Molex?) connectors are mechanically ~stressed~, the "drill press forced into mill duty" issues ... all of it! It all makes sense now.

Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
... I had to learn how to mill slots in sheet metal for this build, using my drill press. It wasn't that hard ...


thumbs up

Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
... A new feature of these new Xfaders is that the B input is normalled to the inverse of the A input for ring-modulation purposes. Setting the CV pot to 50% (12:00) gives unclipped unity gain for ideal ring mod.


All I saw was "bla bla bla Rind Mod .. bla bla bla Ring Mod .. bla bla Ring Mod" ... haahaa! I do like my ring mods! DAMNED NICE job there .. well worth the effort and education? I'd say!

Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
... If anyone wants one of these, please let me know.
We may end up discussing an order. Depends on how well (or poorly) my own ring modulator system ends up working out (no threat to yours at all, it's just a cluster of passive Ken Stones).

Nice Job Man!

cool

(Once more for posterity) .....

imcmahon
I overdid it a bit ordering mutable clone bits... more pcbs enroute from amazingsynth, a batch of rings and streams boards I ordered to try out a board house that was running a deal, and enough parts to build 14 modules w00t

Rex Coil 7
imcmahon wrote:
I overdid it a bit ordering mutable clone bits... more pcbs enroute from amazingsynth, a batch of rings and streams boards I ordered to try out a board house that was running a deal, and enough parts to build 14 modules w00t

Needs more cowbell.
strange tales
Well this is by far the most points I've had to solder. Well worth it though.



imcmahon
First two done!

[/img]
Moog$FooL$
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
I built something.

This is a eurorack-format hex VC crossfader, which I call the HeXFader. This was a "one-off" build for a fellow wiggler. I completely redesigned my VC Xfader circuit for this build (and other applications) so that I can now get two crossfaders out of a single 2164 chip. Hence, each of the three PCBs attached to the panel PCB contains two crossfader circuits. The gain-limiting circuitry is identical to that on the (now discontinued) Intellijel uFade. A new feature of these new Xfaders is that the B input is normalled to the inverse of the A input for ring-modulation purposes. Setting the CV pot to 50% (12:00) gives unclipped unity gain for ideal ring mod.

I had to learn how to mill slots in sheet metal for this build, using my drill press. It wasn't that hard (once I got the drill table tight enough that it wouldn't move and cause my slot to veer off course)! I got it all right the first time. I actually had three panel blanks cut, but only needed one. It turns out that the mounting slots are a little wide (I used a single 1/8" end-mill for all the slots). If I do any more eurorack modules, I'll buy a slightly smaller end-mill for the mounting slots. The customer may need to use washers.

If anyone wants one of these, please let me know. I might actually be persuaded to build another one (but it'll cost ya!). I worked on this one for a month, so I'd like to build another one if only to put all that experience to use.






woah woah woah yowie zowie!! very nice job. thumbs up
d.simon
cfoge video equations eurorack edition (with builtin monitor option).
pretty straightforward, but still managed to have a little debug session - I was missing a SMD resistor on the front.






In some sections the panel is triple layer - bamboo, thin black plastic, and glitter perspex:
Rex Coil 7
This is a Synthesizers.Com Q113 Mixer that's been repanelled, the panel is a Front Panel Express item that I cooked up, as is the "warning" placard.

I wanted a Minimoog type VCO mixer in that I have the ability to turn each channel on and off with a toggle switch. A big toggle switch.

So each black knob corresponds with each toggle switch (Left to right ... 1st black knob is VCO1 volume and 1st toggle switch is VCO1 On/Off ... carry this theme across all four VCO input channels).

I also wanted Bus Feedback Overdrive for the two busses that the common Synthesizers.Com mixer boards use. So, the left RED knob is "Drive" for bus#1 (VCO1 and VCO2) .... the right RED knob is "Drive" for bus#2 (VCO3 and VCO4).

Panel is coated in an industrial coating made for lining the beds of pickup trucks, I like the textured look of it. The "placard" is raw aluminum that Front Panel Express did the lettering engraving on. I did the lettering infill myself, then applied clear coat on top of that.

This module is heavy, what with the stainless hardware, the mounting bolts used to secure the 3mm thick "placard" to the 3mm thick panel, as well as the 4 large toggle switches and their stainless steel flat washers. Has a very nice "solid" feel to it.

You see no "input" jacks because this main mixer module is normalized to the 4 VCOs 'round back. The two outboard-most jacks (far left and far right) are a couple of AUX inputs that have no level controls and are set to unity gain.

















This module mounts in the top-most row of my rig and sits in the center of that row. So it's like a center piece.

applause

EDIT: It only just now hit me that if I were to tire of the black coated finish, since the panel's design is symmetric I can simply disassemble it, flip the panel over to the shiny side, and reassemble it with the wet sanded aluminum side showing.

Yeeeeaaa ...... I thought of that on purpose ...... designed it that way ...... yyeeeeYUP ...... sure I did ..... you betchya!

meh no.
trip
I wanted more nlc neurons in a smaller space, and to learn about pcb design - so I made this:





It's two neurons with attenuverters on the outputs. The neurons can be coupled with the switches and the attenuverters can be used on their own by breaking the jack normalisation on the inputs.
roglok
the bad producer wrote:
Oh bugger, have we started this year already zombie I still have lots from last year Dead Banana



mind boggling! dizzy
morocco_dave
I started this thing last year but finally got it into a proper box just last week. It was finished and in use, but in a plastic takeaway box, for about 3 months prior to that hihi

It's a sort-of gate sequencer, for MIDI.

Video here



Full deets, build docs, pics, etc are all on my website:
https://wp.me/p5VQX0-13X
Cedworth
A lot of this was 2017, but the two PMFoundations modules in the second row were just finished yesterday. That's why I haven't put the sticker on the front panel or given them knobs or even screwed them into the rail yet. I don't like that the CV inputs on the filter don't have an attenuator so I made one.

I've got the rest of the top row sitting on the project desk, it's a Rampage and an Elements. Then I start on the wooden case on the right.

flab
finish 4 MI-braids yesterday- here all calibrated and tested-first builds for 2018 after moving flat and country. Those are a great companion for my analogue VCO collection- just need to callibrate my hexinverter midi2cv to get all of them nicely singing. productive 2018 to everyone
Cedworth
flab wrote:
finish 4 MI-braids yesterday- here all calibrated and tested-first builds for 2018 after moving flat and country. Those are a great companion for my analogue VCO collection- just need to callibrate my hexinverter midi2cv to get all of them nicely singing. productive 2018 to everyone


Nice.

So, do you have to do anything differently as far as components to use the red display, or is it a simple drop in replacement situation?
flab
It is a drop in replacement, but you have control for the alphanumeric brightness through the firmware settings,
AlanP



I tried ordering an aluminium pcb for this panel as a test -- I don't like mounting 1/4" jacks in fibreglass pcb-panels, no matter how thick they are. I think it came out fairly well, although the silkscreen and soldermask isn't very thick.

It's the CGS60 Stomp Box Adaptor, but with NO wiring needed smile I also added a pot to control the Send level (simple voltage divider.)




The Yusynth Comparator in 8HP smile (Yes, I don't like doing wiring!) Somewhat embarrassingly, I forgot to add bypass caps, but those are easily patched onto the back.
LetterBeacon
These look great! Which PCB fabricator did you use?
AlanP
Seeed, IIRC.
autodafe
1) Ardutouch




2) Gynko Grains



3) Befaco Slew Limiter



4) Protoype Arudino-based "VCO"

jwhtn




So, something really went wrong on my library's laser cutter tonight (or, more specifically, something that I did with the cutter was wrong), and I had a ton of flareups, leaving my panels all charred and disheveled. Now, I'm starting to think I dig it.

Anyway, on the far right is a Barton VCA/MIX unit, which is my first completed module aside from the Case Power Mini behind the scenes. The rest will come along shortly as I was mostly waiting to get working panels in place before soldering up the jacks and pots.

Case is 6mm acrylic, from the THX2112 plans, expanded out to 79hp because that's how big my sheet of acrylic was. Panels are 3mm clear acrylic, painted on the back and etched through the paint to form the graphics. They really did look slick, in a non-post-apocalyptic way, in my testing. Ah well.[img][/img]
Rex Coil 7
jwhtn wrote:
.... So, something really went wrong on my library's laser cutter tonight....
Holy shit, your public library has a friggin laser cutter?

Ours has books.
Rex Coil 7
autodafe wrote:


3) Befaco Slew Limiter




BEEF TACO!!! (it's a ~thing~ ... not to worry). Nicely done!

autodafe wrote:


4) Protoype Arudino-based "VCO"

Sooo ... what .... did you chew that hole in the panel? lol
autodafe
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
Sooo ... what .... did you chew that hole in the panel? lol


yeah it's terrible I know, it's for the pushbutton ;-)
just got some new dremel drill bits to make a new one, this was just a 1st prototype anyway
jwhtn
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
jwhtn wrote:
.... So, something really went wrong on my library's laser cutter tonight....
Holy shit, your public library has a friggin laser cutter?

Ours has books.


Lol. Yeah, ours has a little makerspace thing with 3D printers, a CNC mill, and a laser cutter that has given me great results, in the past. And, um, emergent design, in the present. nanners
bleich_4
Hello, I have built the stripboard 808 hi hat circuit (see link) and was wondering if someone could point me to the place in the circuit that deals with decay time for the closed hat sound. Mine seems to be triggering with quite a long decay and i would like the snappy sound found on the original machine.

Vero : http://electro-music.com/forum/phpbb-files/tr_808_hi_hats_stripboard_t op_view_v2_169.jpg

Thanks!
Rex Coil 7
bleich_4 wrote:
Hello, I have built the stripboard 808 hi hat circuit (see link) and was wondering if someone could point me to the place in the circuit that deals with decay time for the closed hat sound. Mine seems to be triggering with quite a long decay and i would like the snappy sound found on the original machine.

Vero : http://electro-music.com/forum/phpbb-files/tr_808_hi_hats_stripboard_t op_view_v2_169.jpg

Thanks!
You will be far better off posting your question as a thread within the Music Tech DIY forum rather than just a post within a DIY "show off" thread. This is more about "look what I made!" rather than specific answers regarding specific modules.

So present your question as a separate troubleshooting thread, you'll get more help that way!

cool
JohnS_AZ
I was lucky enough to score a Hades module while Dreadbox was dipping their toes into the kit business (they quickly pulled it out and ran away confused ) so spent the past few nights putting it together. Was a great kit and a fun built. Sorry they're not doing more kits.



[/img]
bmoren
rev1 of a pseudo secret mixer project:

Rex Coil 7
bmoren wrote:
rev1 of a pseudo secret mixer project:

I wonder if mounting the jacks in the little 2hp panel first, then soldering them to the PCB second would prevent the panel from bending during assembly? I would guess it's tough enough as it is to drill all of the holes in it without bending the heck out of it.
bmoren
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
I wonder if mounting the jacks in the little 2hp panel first, then soldering them to the PCB second would prevent the panel from bending during assembly? I would guess it's tough enough as it is to drill all of the holes in it without bending the heck out of it.


I mounted the jacks to the panel first, then soldered them. It's just that the whole thing is a misaligned mess because I haphazardly laid out the pcb and another collaborator laid out the panel totally separate. But! that's why its just rev1 This is fun!
Misk
My first DIY build of 2018, and my first DIY build ever! Zlob Modular Dual VCA:



Only the top vca works, and neither of the LEDs are lighting up, but it's still a fine start for someone who's only ever made cables before w00t

I'm excited though! I figured all my modules would blow up or something when I plugged it in and powered up, and the fact that it partially works is still a success for me! I even burned one of the thru-holes on the pcb.. which could be the problem. Regardless, my next kit, a befaco mixer, now looks much much easier because of this, and I've learned that DIY modules are much more forgiving than I had thought! glad to be on board!


edit: aaaand it's upside down. not sure how to fix that, as uploading it upside down doesn't flip it right-side up. oh well.
billyhologram
bmoren wrote:
rev1 of a pseudo secret mixer project:



Now that looks awfully familiar.
sixbyseven
After 350 hours spread out over a year, I finally finished my hexagon shaped modular. It used almost every MFOS circuit, Ray designed for a modular synth, that was availible. I also included circuits from Thomas Henry, Yusynth, and Barton musical Instruments. Room for 30, 3-3/4" wide x 8-3/4" modules.

I have 28 installed now. It can hang from the ceiling or be mounted on a heavy duty speaker stand. It is intended for stage demonstrations and performance work.

The image is showing the lid being held up by the synths hanger and sitting on the stand.

Here is the write up:

http://sixbyseven.ca/the-tangerine-dream-large-format-modular-analog-s ynthesizer/




FetidEye
love love
memes_33
finished this lil guy last week:

ashleym
A lot of good, inspirational stuff here!!

Loving the hex unit. I am a big fan of designs that break away from the traditions.

Interesting labelling in the 230 follower above, clever the way the pulse response switches have the transient and sustained wording at each end of their row. Clever
Jarno
AlanP wrote:



I tried ordering an aluminium pcb for this panel as a test -- I don't like mounting 1/4" jacks in fibreglass pcb-panels, no matter how thick they are. I think it came out fairly well, although the silkscreen and soldermask isn't very thick.

It's the CGS60 Stomp Box Adaptor, but with NO wiring needed smile I also added a pot to control the Send level (simple voltage divider.)


Yeah, the insertion force of those 1/4" jacks can be pretty high, especially with some male jacks. Plenty of thread on them though, so you could double up on the frontpanel, the jacks and pots have plenty of thread, maybe compensate by pushing them back a little ways (the 1/8" jacks do not have so much thread length).
I did this for my monitor controller with XLR outs, the insertion force on those is also pretty high. And FR4 as frontpanel material is actually pretty stiff, because of the glass content, it's just that the regular PCB thickness of 1.6mm is pretty thin when used as a structural part.
DEEMARKAY
jwhtn wrote:




So, something really went wrong on my library's laser cutter tonight (or, more specifically, something that I did with the cutter was wrong), and I had a ton of flareups, leaving my panels all charred and disheveled. Now, I'm starting to think I dig it.
[img][/img]



very cool! gotta make sure to save those "wrong" settings then.
reminds me of bubble gum machines in the street, where the acrylic window has been burned a hole into in order to rob the machine.

How is that labeling done, etched or behind the panel? Can't quite tell from the pictures.
jwhtn
sixbyseven wrote:







This is frickin bonkers. I'm in love.
jwhtn
DEEMARKAY wrote:



very cool! gotta make sure to save those "wrong" settings then.
reminds me of bubble gum machines in the street, where the acrylic window has been burned a hole into to rob the machine.

How is that labeling done, etched or behing the panel? Can't quite tell from the pictures.


Yeah, I kinda like the back-corner-of-the-shady-arcade aesthetic. Suits my music, I suppose.

The panels are clear acrylic, which I painted on the back side, and then etched through the paint. When it comes out as intended, there's a very pro-looking jeweled kind of effect, where the graphics are recessed and sort of 3D-looking. It's a cool technique, but it clearly needs some refining...
PWM
Made a Sync/Trigger input for the QFG. Great module even better! smile



Jarno
First module of the year, and finally have a proper place where I can solder (since we moved almost a year ago).
A ring modulator using Edcox XS1100 transformers I still had from a preamp which did not quite materialise.
The diodes are NOS germanium, I bought a pack of ten which were matched, but not close enough to my liking so I selected a quad which were a bit tighter.
To the best of my knowledge the XS1100 is meant to be driven with a discrete opamp like an API 2520, so I add two output stages (opamp with BD139-BD140 follower pair).
They are normalled to the ringmod, but I can also use them separately for experimenting with slinkys and plate reverbs grin

The styling was inspired by an analog studio which I frequent, full of old 50-60 measurement equipment (the guy running that studio is an early electronic music expert).
The panel is, let's say, not quite fitting the width of the module smile





The low-end out of this thing is quite amazing!
dot matrix madness
Top line of the panel should read "Analoger Multiplizierer/" (smart-assing...) hihi
Must weigh half a ton. thumbs up
Jarno
grin

Thanks! Next time round I'll ask one of "ze Dzjermans" around here to proofread. smile
But yeah, it does weigh a ton, I wonder if the acrylic will slowly bend, because of creep. Also, one needs to angle it between the two rack rails because it sticks out in all directions, so you need to have about 30HP free to be able to mount it. Regardless, it sounds great. And if anyone here wants one of those tiny boards with the output stage, let me know (headphone amp, plate reverb driver, reverb spring driver, monitor amp, lightbulb driver, relay driver etc etc).
JanneI
Hi,

I finally finished my Moog Prodigy clone project and here's some pics. It's based on http://sigmambient.blogspot.fi/2016/05/moog-prodigy-is-alive.html and I added Fatar 4-octave keybed and midi implant. Woodwork and panel design is custom. Sounds great and looks awesome! smile





[/img]
Rex Coil 7
Holy Crap .... sooper nice work on the Prodigy clone! I'd bet the front panel cost a mint!

Absolutely excellent piece of dreamsmanship brought to life in craftsmanship.

Diggin it! thumbs up Rockin' Banana!
wiperactive
Beautiful work!

If Moog had released a late 1984 deluxe limited edition this could have been it.
Rex Coil 7
JanneI wrote:
Hi,

I finally finished my Moog Prodigy clone project ...
[/img]
What type of toggle switches are those?

And, is there a FPD "object" (if you will) for the surrounding holes for those toggles?

Those toggles look very similar to the ones Korg uses on various models within their catalog (Volcas, Mono/Mini/Pro-logue, others) and I'd be interested to know what they are and what size Front Panel Designer hole is required.

As I said in my previous post about this project .... bad ass synth, Holmes! It absolutely deserves a name plate ....





thumbs up
Rex Coil 7
Jarno wrote:
First module of the year, and finally have a proper place where I can solder (since we moved almost a year ago).
A ring modulator using Edcox XS1100 transformers
Safe to say you typo'd "Edcox" but meant to type "Edcor" instead? Nice transformers! I've been wanting to do one using a pair of their WSM series transformers, like what member *CZ Rider used in his ...

LINK to Edcor WSM Series ($11.00 each) - 10k:10k (1:1) = http://www.edcorusa.com/wsm_series

IMAGE = Member *fluxmonkey DIY'd ring mod, these are WSM series Edcor transformers:



I just used the stock CGS/Modular Addict "passive ring mod" PCB with the regular called for Mouser transformers, but I added sockets for the diodes so as to be able to test out different ones. Aside from using Germanium diodes, I found a preference for using square LEDs as diodes in my own ring mod circuits. I use a toggle switch to A/B between ring mod with Germs, and ring mod with LEDs. I'm happy, but I definitely want to try one with better transformers (better frequency response, the little Mouser ones have a top end of only about 6.5khz or so). Edcor WSM series are advertised to be 20hz to 20khz/ .. the ones you used are advertised to be 10hz to 50khz (!!! DAYUM !!!) however they're also more than twice the money at $25.00 each! I'll have to think about that, I'd need FOUR of those ... $100.00 bucks worth of transformers!

LINK to the Edcor XS1100 ($25.00 each) = http://www.edcorusa.com/xs1100

Here's my double decker (I have two of this entire assembly in my synth, one for each 2 VCO voice x 2 voices):







Jarno wrote:

The panel is, let's say, not quite fitting the width of the module smile





The low-end out of this thing is quite amazing!
You absolutely win the "Repurposing Old Fuddup Synth Panels as Stooge Plates" award! Nice job in using up your older projects to create an all new one!

thumbs up
Jarno
Thanks Rex, yes, "Edcor" is what I meant to type smile

I have the WSM transformers as well, but not 10k:10k, I needed something roughly 1:1 so that's why I used the XS1100's (and needed something beefy to drive them).

The bracket I made from a bit of scrap aluminium at work, not a synth (the horror!) grin
Rex Coil 7
Jarno wrote:
Thanks Rex, yes, "Edcor" is what I meant to type smile

I have the WSM transformers as well, but not 10k:10k, I needed something roughly 1:1 so that's why I used the XS1100's (and needed something beefy to drive them).

The bracket I made from a bit of scrap aluminium at work, not a synth (the horror!) grin
Meh ... you still did a nice job of recycling old stuff! Good on ya!

thumbs up
bonzai
Got two little projects on the weekend:
1. MTM Spring mk2 kit build (photo is obvious, so I leave it out wink )
2. Shrunk my diy Poti expander from 3 to 2 HP (this time in alu, looks better next to the Batumi) and did some re-org in the case.

Now I got 8 HP left again - not sure yet, how to fill it though... smile

JanneI
Rex Coil 7 wrote:

What type of toggle switches are those?


13mm width
10mm height
3mm corner radius

that's what I used, pretty good if not perfect. http://www.banzaimusic.com/ has those 3-step switches but I had to purchase those on-on switches from syntaur or some other retro parts shop..

I love how this thing looks, but I got to say it did come with a price tag. Nevertheless, next I'll be doing the same for crowminius, custom case and panels...all for the price of 10 Behringer D's ;-)
slaughterhousesam


16 stage cgs programmer, stage skip/refuse switch mods, touch keyboard (works *very* nicely), pair of cgs bi directional routers filling out the top row
emmaker
slaughterhousesam wrote:

16 stage cgs programmer, stage skip/refuse switch mods, touch keyboard (works *very* nicely), pair of cgs bi directional routers filling out the top row


I've been thinking about building an implementation of the touch keypbard but really haven't seen anyone comment on how well it works.

slaughterhouseam could you comment in more detail how the touch keyboard works especially the touch/pressure aspects of it?

Thanks
Jay S.
Rex Coil 7
emmaker wrote:
the touch keypbard ....

Thanks
Jay S.
I love how your brain TOTALLY locked up and got stuck between "keyboard" and "keypad". Haahaa!!!

keypbard ..... fekking precious. lol lol

.... happens to all of us at one time or another ....

thumbs up
emmaker
Sometime accidents work for the better.

hihi applause
Jarno
slaughterhousesam wrote:


16 stage cgs programmer, stage skip/refuse switch mods, touch keyboard (works *very* nicely), pair of cgs bi directional routers filling out the top row


Let me guess, almost no wiring? grin
Looks great man, pretty epic project.
Luka
My ttsh and arp seq now having matching cases

I just need to source a dc-dc converter for my sequencer, some fixings, and some a base plate for the seq case.

Caseyjholmes
First build of 2018 completed.
slaughterhousesam
emmaker wrote:
slaughterhousesam wrote:

16 stage cgs programmer, stage skip/refuse switch mods, touch keyboard (works *very* nicely), pair of cgs bi directional routers filling out the top row


I've been thinking about building an implementation of the touch keypbard but really haven't seen anyone comment on how well it works.

slaughterhouseam could you comment in more detail how the touch keyboard works especially the touch/pressure aspects of it?

Thanks
Jay S.


i can only talk about how well it integrates with the cgs programmer, i.e. its individual gate outs just feed the stage select inputs, and only the combined pressure out is used, but given that, its really good - very light touch will activate a stage, brushing the finger along the full length give nice sweeps up and down the stages. the pressure will take some practice to fully gel with, but its very controllable at the moment, albeit with half the voltage range between what id call a very light touch and a normal touch, some actual press needed to get it uptp full, and the strip itself feels really nice. recommended
slaughterhousesam
Jarno wrote:
slaughterhousesam wrote:


16 stage cgs programmer, stage skip/refuse switch mods, touch keyboard (works *very* nicely), pair of cgs bi directional routers filling out the top row


Let me guess, almost no wiring? grin
Looks great man, pretty epic project.


ugh, wiring. thats been a large chunk of the weekend. programmer boards take a lot of point to point wiring out, but start adding stage switches and the keyboard and its all back again...
cygmu
slaughterhousesam wrote:

ugh, wiring. thats been a large chunk of the weekend. programmer boards take a lot of point to point wiring out, but start adding stage switches and the keyboard and its all back again...


You work quickly! When I made my sequencer with the touch keyboard I was wiring for weeks, it seemed. I want to add switches for selectable gate on-off but I don't have the heart to open it up again.
slaughterhousesam
cygmu wrote:
slaughterhousesam wrote:

ugh, wiring. thats been a large chunk of the weekend. programmer boards take a lot of point to point wiring out, but start adding stage switches and the keyboard and its all back again...


You work quickly! When I made my sequencer with the touch keyboard I was wiring for weeks, it seemed. I want to add switches for selectable gate on-off but I don't have the heart to open it up again.


i was thinking of gate switches as well, but im going to be building a pair of gate sequencers to handle that kind of thing, and already have the klee gate buses which can be pressed into service quite nicely. in the end i settled for dropping in a pair of routers - now i can route a row to muting the clock for envelope gates, or switching between clock divisions for ratchety shenanigans, or all other kinds of gate manipulations. and i was running out of room smile
fluxmonkey
hay no, that's my hand, and my build from some years ago. no edcor transformers were harmed in making this ringmod, but i did drop it on my foot and lost a toenail...

Jarno
It's a tactical ring modulator, you can use it to mangle sound, but you can also put it in a sock and mangle burglars grin
Rex Coil 7
Woopsy! Thanks for correcting that. I've edited the post in kind.

Rex Coil 7 wrote:
IMAGE = Member *fluxmonkey DIY'd ring mod, these are WSM series Edcor transformers:


fluxmonkey wrote:
hay no, that's my hand, and my build from some years ago. no edcor transformers were harmed in making this ringmod, but i did drop it on my foot and lost a toenail...

audioCTRL
last night I put 2 x NLC delay no more in a small box.
When Andrew F says "It's just fucked!" he's spot on lol
I hooked up out 1 to in 2 with a switch jack, running audio through both units (all 4 x pt2399s) makes it even more fucked...

Rex Coil 7
audioCTRL wrote:


You should have painted it red.
audioCTRL
I almost went for red leds too razz
Repeater


New Horndog prototype.
J3RK
I picked up a CLee LW Boat, and wanted to build a little boat-setup to go with my recent Elektron device acquisitions. I really like these boats, and may need to pick up another one. About as solid as it gets, and the distribution is nice too. I popped a MIDImplant behind a 1U panel to make interfacing with the Digitakt (and DigiTone when it arrives) a little easier. I may swap the Spline Generator out for a Dual Angle Generator instead, so I have a little more control. The Spline is better in a slightly larger setup I think. I may also swap out the Operator for a smaller VCO and a bit more utility, since the DigiTone will be more than enough where Phase Modulation is concerned. I may need to re-orient the PCB on the back of the output module. I want to put it on the right side of the case, but I didn't allow for the tolerance needed there, since these were originally intended for Vector rails.

Actually, after posting this, I decided to create two multi-function modules to replace two of the existing single-function modules. This will allow this single boat to function independently or with the gear I mentioned above. One of the two modules has a VCO and a Sample and Shift setup. The second has a Mixer, Low Pass Gate, and an Angle Generator. It should be a pretty flexible little boat once I get those in.

the bad producer
Super nice, makes me want to try a 'Stroh' only box too thumbs up Looking forward to more designs, but I must finish the Operators first!
OB1
My first build... Zlob Modular Dual VCA



bonzai
Built Eric Archers TB808 Snare Clone on the weekend, including the original mods from the service manual and with an added Gate to trigger converter.
Of course I once again got the poti orientation back to front (hooray, bodge wires!) and the component spacing is a bit tight, but besides of that it's working very well, especially when sending it some crazy euclidians from PNW grin





Still 4 HP to go until my 3x84HP case is full. Next stop: very likely the hihat clone, and then I need to start populating my first diy one-row case... smile

PS: the Stroh synth looks really sexy! grin
ashleym
OB1 wrote:
My first build... Zlob Modular Dual VCA



Very neat for a first build. Did it work first(ish) time? Have you learnt much? My only constructive comment is to use ic sockets for the chips. I’m not assuming you didn’t think to as there might be size issues. There must be something good in the Brizzle water
OB1
ashleym wrote:

Very neat for a first build. Did it work first(ish) time? Have you learnt much? My only constructive comment is to use ic sockets for the chips. I’m not assuming you didn’t think to as there might be size issues. There must be something good in the Brizzle water


Thanks - pretty much my first time soldering anything more complicated than the RCA cables on a pair of Technics. Not sure if it works yet as I'm waiting for the power supply for my case to be fixed. I've definitely learnt a lot. Through-hole soldering is quite easy, but I can feel my technique improving - I'm doing a Befaco output at the moment and the joints are a lot tidier. I built this from a kit and IC sockets weren't included, I guess because it all fits into 2hp and the sockets would make the ICs stick out too far.
bonzai
Little hint (this is what I do for testing out stuff): you can take two 9v block batteries and connect them together (Plus of battery 1 goes to Minus of battery 2).
The connected terminal will be ground, the remaining free ones are then -9/+9.
This should for most modules be enough juice to see whether everything works in principle or if anything gets toasty (of course the modules may not behave exactly as desired due to the lower voltage, but that's fine).

I've made a little test rig on stripboard for that with 9V battery clips on one side, a dpst switch to switch the thing on and off, some leds with resistors to show power state and some headers for -9/GND/+9 connecting to the module under test. Works really well, I use it a lot. smile
If I find time, I can post a photo...
ClausF
Exactly what I do too
OB1
bonzai wrote:
Little hint (this is what I do for testing out stuff): you can take two 9v block batteries and connect them together (Plus of battery 1 goes to Minus of battery 2).
The connected terminal will be ground, the remaining free ones are then -9/+9.
This should for most modules be enough juice to see whether everything works in principle or if anything gets toasty (of course the modules may not behave exactly as desired due to the lower voltage, but that's fine).

I've made a little test rig on stripboard for that with 9V battery clips on one side, a dpst switch to switch the thing on and off, some leds with resistors to show power state and some headers for -9/GND/+9 connecting to the module under test. Works really well, I use it a lot. smile
If I find time, I can post a photo...


Totally gonna try this tonight!! Thanks :-)
bonzai
Okay, here it is:


Still looking for a small box for it to make it look a bit nicer. wink
I then just use those standard breadboard cables (male to female) to wire it up to the module.

Here it is paired with a very simple LM386 based amplifier, straight off the datasheet:
OB1
That’s awesome, great tip. Gonna build myself something similar. Thanks.

Did my second build last night. The Befaco Output mkII (custom knob/switch covers):




OB1
Chaos NAND today... easy build.



infovore


I started with Timo Rozendal's excellent CEM3340 circuit; then, for my own ends, swapped out the falling-edge hard sync with a sine shaper. Which, it turns out, works very well (once I bodged around a niggling issue).

Really rather pleased with that.

(It's one PCB, I'm just showing two to show the back as well).

Ends up looking like this:



Entirely for personal use, obviously, but a fun build.
trip
J3RK wrote:



All of these recent Stroh builds are really stunning
Rex Coil 7
trip wrote:
J3RK wrote:



All of these recent Stroh builds are really stunning
Member *J3RK is a very talented synthesizer designer and builder. Most certainly well above the average mook. One would do well to look up to his efforts.
OB1
Turing Machine MkII







Biggest build I’ve done yet. Worked first time :-)
das_Produkt
My case was full. So I repaneled my MFOS Quad VCA and my two Synthacon Filters.

With the denser layout I freed two vertical rows, enough room for a small mixer.


I had those filters for more than a year. And today, I noticed for the first time that "band pass" is printed in bold. On both versions...

Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
I've already posted these in another thread, but here are the front and back pictures of my latest mad creation: a dual 2x4 or single 1x8 channel interpolating scanner. The mode is selected with a switch. Each channel has its own attenuator and output jack. Also, channels 1-4 and channels 5-8 have dedicated output jacks, as well as channels 1-8. Each scanner has a Fade control (for selecting the channel you hear), a Range control (which goes from "all channels output simulateously" to "channels widely separated with silence"), and CV which is like moving the Fade control automatically. When the scanner is in 2x4 mode, you can play each side separately, for example: 1-2-3-4-3-2-1-2-3-4 and 5-6-7-8-7-6-5-6-7-8. If done like that, then the pairs of outputs would be heard from the combined output. If the phase or frequency of the incoming CV signals are changed, then the voices heard together would slowly change. In 1x8 mode, then one could play all eight voices like this: 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8. Any voice can be turned down or off, to create gaps in the sequence.

I haven't tested this beast yet (although the PCB layouts are all tested and confirmed). Once I prove it all works properly, it's off to a fellow wiggler. (And yes, I realize that the little pots are too close together, but the knobs don't touch, so whatever.) Also, note that there are four circuit boards stacked together (two morpher function generators and two quad VCA boards), plus a board with the eight attenuator pots on it and the little daughterboard on top (for the combined A+B output), so the wiring was a significant chore -- it took basically a whole day to wire up.

ashleym
das_Produkt wrote:

I had those filters for more than a year. And today, I noticed for the first time that "band pass" is printed in bold. On both versions...



Well it is a mix of HP and LP, the density of the typeface reflects this. You can't teach cleverness like this Dancing Star Dancing Star Dancing Star Dancing Star
das_Produkt
ashleym wrote:
das_Produkt wrote:

I had those filters for more than a year. And today, I noticed for the first time that "band pass" is printed in bold. On both versions...



Well it is a mix of HP and LP, the density of the typeface reflects this. You can't teach cleverness like this Dancing Star Dancing Star Dancing Star Dancing Star


Ah, right. My subconsciousness knew this all along...
the bad producer
Nice panels das_Produkt, useful VCA that one! It also reminds me that my Steiner VCF languishes in a box somewhere unknown waah
J3RK
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
I've already posted these in another thread, but here are the front and back pictures of my latest mad creation: a dual 2x4 or single 1x8 channel interpolating scanner. The mode is selected with a switch. Each channel has its own attenuator and output jack. Also, channels 1-4 and channels 5-8 have dedicated output jacks, as well as channels 1-8. Each scanner has a Fade control (for selecting the channel you hear), a Range control (which goes from "all channels output simulateously" to "channels widely separated with silence"), and CV which is like moving the Fade control automatically. When the scanner is in 2x4 mode, you can play each side separately, for example: 1-2-3-4-3-2-1-2-3-4 and 5-6-7-8-7-6-5-6-7-8. If done like that, then the pairs of outputs would be heard from the combined output. If the phase or frequency of the incoming CV signals are changed, then the voices heard together would slowly change. In 1x8 mode, then one could play all eight voices like this: 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8. Any voice can be turned down or off, to create gaps in the sequence.

I haven't tested this beast yet (although the PCB layouts are all tested and confirmed). Once I prove it all works properly, it's off to a fellow wiggler. (And yes, I realize that the little pots are too close together, but the knobs don't touch, so whatever.) Also, note that there are four circuit boards stacked together (two morpher function generators and two quad VCA boards), plus a board with the eight attenuator pots on it and the little daughterboard on top (for the combined A+B output), so the wiring was a significant chore -- it took basically a whole day to wire up.



Nice!!

That seems like it would be a fun module. Now you have to build an Extrapolating Scanner w00t
das_Produkt
the bad producer wrote:
Nice panels das_Produkt, useful VCA that one!

Thanks.

the bad producer wrote:
It also reminds me that my Steiner VCF languishes in a box somewhere unknown waah

You should either find it or build another one. (Or two...) It's great.
forestcaver
bonzai wrote:
Built Eric Archers TB808 Snare Clone on the weekend,


Hi Bonzai - that looks really neat - do you happen to have images for the etch of the pub I could steal (if that is not too cheeky) please ? :-) (Also looking for bass drum and hi-hats !)

Cheers !
BillLynes
My first SMD module. GSMN! Pure VCA.


[/img]
BillLynes
infovore wrote:


I started with Timo Rozendal's excellent CEM3340 circuit; then, for my own ends, swapped out the falling-edge hard sync with a sine shaper. Which, it turns out, works very well (once I bodged around a niggling issue).

Really rather pleased with that.

(It's one PCB, I'm just showing two to show the back as well).

Ends up looking like this:



Entirely for personal use, obviously, but a fun build.


Might try this one as my next VCO module.
bonzai
forestcaver wrote:
bonzai wrote:
Built Eric Archers TB808 Snare Clone on the weekend,


Hi Bonzai - that looks really neat - do you happen to have images for the etch of the pub I could steal (if that is not too cheeky) please ? :-) (Also looking for bass drum and hi-hats !)

Cheers !


Hi forestcaver!

Well, thanks! smile Sure, but I need to clean up the layout a little first - want to fix that upside down pot(s) issue and the spacing for the trimmer, that really annoys me. Will PM you then... wink

Bass drum: I have done the layout last year, same problem with the pots. Not sure, what the status is atm, haven't checked it for a while. So, in principle it's there as well with some quirks.

The Hihat is still in my WIP schematics queue (and therefore also no pcb layout yet, that's a task that I absolutely hate - tips and tricks highly welcome!). Unfortunately, I maxed out the 300 pad counter in the Diptrace freeware version with it, and there are still some essential parts (such as a power connector) missing... meh
Not sure yet on how to proceed with that one, it's really a massive thing. Maybe I'll split it into several pcbs and stack them on top of each other, when I've figured out how to do that in Diptrace, that is...

tl;dr: may take some weeks. If someone else already had a go at it: let us know! wink

Cheers!
DMR
I made a 2HP expander for the 4MS rotating clock divider:




infovore
BillLynes wrote:
Might try this one as my next VCO module.


Well - I'm afraid this precise panel and board probably won't ever be very available, given it's very much just my own modification of Timo's circuit, which he makes available via eg Modular Addict. I just was really interested in getting a sine out of it and it turns out it was a straightforward mod.
BillLynes
Just completed my first Mutable Instruments clone. Not sure which knobs to use yet. cool







BillLynes
Thanks for the info. I'll have to look elsewhere I guess. cool

infovore wrote:
BillLynes wrote:
Might try this one as my next VCO module.


Well - I'm afraid this precise panel and board probably won't ever be very available, given it's very much just my own modification of Timo's circuit, which he makes available via eg Modular Addict. I just was really interested in getting a sine out of it and it turns out it was a straightforward mod.
GilgaFrank
Latest madness involves converting some old home organ pedals (thanks ebay) into MIDI bass pedals using an Arduino to scan the diode matrix. Only one octave but I'm going to add octave up/down footswitches and a transpose facility. When it finally gets finished it'll be impressive, probably.

forestcaver
bonzai wrote:


Well, thanks! smile Sure, but I need to clean up the layout a little first - Will PM you then..

Cheers!


Thanks a lot! Good luck with the hihats!
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
GilgaFrank wrote:
Latest madness involves converting some old home organ pedals (thanks ebay) into MIDI bass pedals using an Arduino to scan the diode matrix. Only one octave but I'm going to add octave up/down footswitches and a transpose facility. When it finally gets finished it'll be impressive, probably.


This is something I've also been planning to do for quite some time. I have a couple of pedalboards from old organs which I've taken apart. I would use a matrix scanning circuit based on discrete logic rather than an Arduino -- I've done it for organ keyboards, and it works very well. Until then, the old organ parts will continue to clutter up my garage.
GilgaFrank
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:

This is something I've also been planning to do for quite some time. I have a couple of pedalboards from old organs which I've taken apart. I would use a matrix scanning circuit based on discrete logic rather than an Arduino -- I've done it for organ keyboards, and it works very well. Until then, the old organ parts will continue to clutter up my garage.


Once you identify the row and column pins on the pedalboard, the Arduino code is 90% written for you with the Keypad library's example code. So it's simply a matter of adding in the MIDI library and adding note on/off data to the keypad's event handlers.
Electronic Battle
Hello

A kit from http://www.edv-technik-ts.de/ and a Schaeffer 2U 19" front panel and a PSU and some wiring. I posted the details elsewhere (instead of here which would have been much more appropriate. Sorry):

https://www.muffwiggler.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=197081&start=0&postd ays=0&postorder=asc&highlight=



(It works very well and now drives my Fenixes from my Sledge).
Rex Coil 7
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
GilgaFrank wrote:
Latest madness involves converting some old home organ pedals (thanks ebay) into MIDI bass pedals using an Arduino to scan the diode matrix. Only one octave but I'm going to add octave up/down footswitches and a transpose facility. When it finally gets finished it'll be impressive, probably.


This is something I've also been planning to do for quite some time. I have a couple of pedalboards from old organs which I've taken apart. I would use a matrix scanning circuit based on discrete logic rather than an Arduino -- I've done it for organ keyboards, and it works very well. Until then, the old organ parts will continue to clutter up my garage.

Warning .... there are pictures below:


I actually have a Bass Pedal/MIDI-OUT kit that was made in 2012. It uses the vintage Hammond M100 type bass pedals. Those are the ones that have a Double Throw switch in each pedal/note (normally closed and normally open). The MIDI kit was made by a place called midipedals (no longer exists). I did NOT populate that board!





I have many more pictures (traces and components). As well as full documentation regarding installation and use.

Never built it, but I really want to! I need to buy a little teensy tiny fiberboard part that activates the DT switch (seen standing vertically in the upper most picture). I'm missing exactly one.

Dash it all!

thumbs up
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
GilgaFrank wrote:
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:

This is something I've also been planning to do for quite some time. I have a couple of pedalboards from old organs which I've taken apart. I would use a matrix scanning circuit based on discrete logic rather than an Arduino -- I've done it for organ keyboards, and it works very well. Until then, the old organ parts will continue to clutter up my garage.


Once you identify the row and column pins on the pedalboard, the Arduino code is 90% written for you with the Keypad library's example code. So it's simply a matter of adding in the MIDI library and adding note on/off data to the keypad's event handlers.


Yeah, great, except that I don't have a clue about all that stuff. 4067s and 4520s and flip flops: these are things that I understand. Arduino code, not so much. I'm hopelessly old school.
dot matrix madness
After being years on my backlist I finally got the time to build the CGS Voltage Controlled Wave Multiplier for Eurorack in 10HP.
Top and middle sections are on the upper board.



the bad producer
Nice job! I stripboarded one of those, so I know what work you've done there!
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
Cool stripboards! However, would anybody be interested if I laid that circuit out for one-sided PCBs in Sketchy mode?
robpiya
Finally decided to take up SDIY! Ordered up a passive multiple and a Befaco Dual Atenuverter from Oshpark. Thank you Befaco for the open source designs!
Cutting and drilling the aluminum panels took some time and patience. Still have to add graphics.



dot matrix madness
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
Cool stripboards! However, would anybody be interested if I laid that circuit out for one-sided PCBs in Sketchy mode?

Stripboard? Veroboard!
Moog$FooL$
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
Cool stripboards! However, would anybody be interested if I laid that circuit out for one-sided PCBs in Sketchy mode?



uummm.... i thought u already had that. no??
u have your own wave mult already. hmmm.....
BillLynes


Completed the Music Thing Modular, Turing Machine. applause
elmegil
you got an extra img tag in there Bill....
BillLynes
elmegil wrote:
you got an extra img tag in there Bill....


Sorted, Thanks.
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
dot matrix madness wrote:
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
Cool stripboards! However, would anybody be interested if I laid that circuit out for one-sided PCBs in Sketchy mode?

Stripboard? Veroboard!


Stripboard, veroboard, protoboard... what's the difference?

Does anybody want a PCB? It'll look something like this:

Moog$FooL$
gee.... thanx for answering my question.

angry
cygmu
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:

Does anybody want a PCB? It'll look something like this:


What circuit are you referring to Doc? The stripboard post that you replied to in the first place was a CGS113 Serge wave multiplier I think. (Could have been CGS29 but I don't think so based on the front panel.) Is that what you've laid out? The pic you posted has no diodes so I don't think so... unless that's a pic of a different circuit just to show the style. Boy am I confused!
selfdestroyer
uO_c

First time doing SMD other than FV-1 chips for guitar effects.



I ordered a magpie sandblasted white panel for it today and I can't wait to get it mounted. Looking forward to my next build.
Cheradenine
Here's the last Modcan A format modules I've built :

Oakley dual S-VCO :





Toppobrillo 281 fuction generator


robpiya
Just got done with the Sampling Modulator from Befaco. Wicked little module! The smd parts came pre-soldered with the pcb/panel set from ModularAddict thumbs up .






OB1
Just built this: http://modlfo.github.io/projects/blur/





I realise it looks rough as fuck, but it works and it is what it is!
BillLynes


And then there were two. It's peanut butter jelly time!
Norgatron
I'm kicking off my Eurorack drums skiff with a combined Rim Shot and Clap from the Hexinverter Nein Oh Nein range. I got the PCBs from Modular Addict.



I wanted to try a few panel ideas out, so I made it quite hard for myself. The two main things were:
1) Use the UV printing and threaded studs from Schaeffer
2) have a sub-panel so there are no nuts showing on the frontpanel.

I would have made an exception for the socket nuts but then I decided that the other idea would be:

3) Make it look as close as possible to the TR-909.

That meant having to have PCB mount sockets. Of course, with the studs on the back of the panel I could fix the PCB in place. But, I woud have to make a PCB. Which I've never done before.
The whole thing was quite tight on space too. I had to carefully select small enough sockets to leave space for the fixings.
I got the knobs from the folks doing Nava clones and they are 6mm D shaft which limited the potentiometer choices too.

With the PCB mounting to consider as well it became a bit of a puzzle to align everything 'just so'.

Luckily a colleague is a regular at Fab Lab and he cut my front-panel and sub-panels in perspex so I could check everything. In the end I decided to stick with the perspex sub-panel instead of getting one from Schaeffer.



I made a couple of errors on the sub-panel and I woud have had a new one cut but the laser at Fab Lab broke. I couldn't wait so I redrilled it myself.

The PCB was made by PCBWay for $5 plus postage but despite apparently getting everything right it was still a fuck up. I was so sure it was right but when I wired it in it was all back to front. All the signals were grounded and vice-versa. Turns out, whoever entered the Lumberg socket part into Eagle swapped a couple of the pins around and I never noticed. Rather than get it redone I decided to simply hack it. Cutting tracks and soldering wires directly onto the pads. Better luck next time.



The front-panel was perfect though. I think I stretched the UV printing as far as I could. It pretty good but the colours are OK rather than great and the detail is no better than a basic inkjet printer gets on paper.







roglok
Norgatron wrote:
I'm kicking off my Eurorack drums skiff with a combined Rim Shot and Clap from the Hexinverter Nein Oh Nein range. I got the PCBs from Modular Addict.


great work. tell us about this:



blind hole with threaded standoff super-glued into place?
Norgatron
Thanks!

That is the threaded bolt fitted by Schaeffer. They do bushed inserts or these stud types. Look here under Bolts and Bushes https://www.schaeffer-ag.de/en/products/a_z/#item

Although I saved on engraving by using UV printing the cost was pushed up by this hardware. They were EUR2.13 each + EUR 5.19 work on the
rear panel.

Here's a shot of the completed build from the back. The outer pillars on this side are holding the subpanel and the Rim PCB on top. The inner pillars are fitted to the sub-panel amd hold up the Clap PCB. On the other side it's vice versa.



It's not really made clear how they fix these in place. There may be some glue but I think it's more likely a mechanical thing. Either a reverse thread or push fitting. Either way I was happy with the strength and stability of them. For a long time I've really wanted to try these out with a mind to using them on my SS30M project (see footer) which will be a big 19" panel.
sduck
I've used those - and had them come off. Early version, back when the US company had just started doing it. It was a 5U panel, with 3 PCBs hanging off of 4 of those threaded inserts, and for whatever reason one of them came loose. I glued it back in with JB Weld after consulting with FPE about it. I think they've improved the way they do it since then.
Norgatron
sduck wrote:
I've used those - and had them come off. Early version, back when the US company had just started doing it. It was a 5U panel, with 3 PCBs hanging off of 4 of those threaded inserts, and for whatever reason one of them came loose. I glued it back in with JB Weld after consulting with FPE about it. I think they've improved the way they do it since then.


That's good to know. The extra cost is worth it to me to get that nice finish.
Faustgeist
A few off the bench this year...


The Talko is an ultra beginner build, recommended to get your confidence up. Almost too easy really.


The Slew limited is also beginner project and easy to check/verify



The Swamp is a next step for early DIY'ers - lots of components, so organization needed, and perhaps a Multimeter - but this one does not need tuning afterwards. Where as many VCO might want you to have an oscilloscope to polish off. The Swamp is good for the cost and for the utility in (at least) my rack!


The latest Turing is also great for 'next step' DIY'ers. But be careful the Pulses MK2 does require surface mount soldering - maybe only 10 components but they are tiny 603 format = tiny. It can be frustrating when it's your first. Take your time and have a clean work area (and imho no plush rug underneath you hihi )



I, myself, am an intermediate DIY'er. Built maybe 30 modules for Eurorack but only 2 with SMT. Soon I will start swimming in the deep end! nanners nanners
autodafe
Just finished the Jupiter Storm + Galilean Moons by Hexinverter.
I got the Panel+PCB kit from a guy here in Milan who didn't complete it...

No issues on the Storm, on the Galilean I mounted a Transistor worng, but I solved the issue with the help of user muckmires (thx again, see
https://www.muffwiggler.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=197578)


OB1
Just done a Frequency Central System X VCO (Roland System 100m VCO "clone"). Was a bit of a labour of love - I ordered the wrong pots twice and the wrong switch twice, then ran out of jacks partway through as I got bored waiting for the right pots/switches and built something else that used a couple of jacks - so this took a lot longer than it should have!









Worked first time! Not calibrated it yet, but it seems to track almost perfectly already anyway.
Starrefision
OB1 wrote:
Just built this: http://modlfo.github.io/projects/blur/





I realise it looks rough as fuck, but it works and it is what it is!


hey ob1, can you post a pic of the back of your blur? i have parts for it on order, really looking forward to a little distortion.
OB1
Sure, I'll upload it later this evening. I'm planning to rework it as this was a first attempt and, although it works fine, the circuit layout isn't great, I had to use a big ugly capacitor as it was the only one I had with the right farad rating and the pot is wired backwards!
FetidEye
what is that shiny metal part with the black top?
OB1
You mean this?



If so, it's not metal, it's a film capacitor. Just a massive, ugly one! It was the only cap I had with the right farad rating seriously, i just don't get it
GilgaFrank
OB1 wrote:
Just done a Frequency Central System X VCO (Roland System 100m VCO "clone"). Was a bit of a labour of love - I ordered the wrong pots twice and the wrong switch twice, then ran out of jacks partway through as I got bored waiting for the right pots/switches and built something else that used a couple of jacks - so this took a lot longer than it should have!

Worked first time! Not calibrated it yet, but it seems to track almost perfectly already anyway.


I love my System X builds. VCO could use a little more range on the PWM but the filters sound utterly beautiful.

Rex Coil 7
GilgaFrank wrote:
OB1 wrote:
Just done a Frequency Central System X VCO (Roland System 100m VCO "clone"). Was a bit of a labour of love - I ordered the wrong pots twice and the wrong switch twice, then ran out of jacks partway through as I got bored waiting for the right pots/switches and built something else that used a couple of jacks - so this took a lot longer than it should have!

Worked first time! Not calibrated it yet, but it seems to track almost perfectly already anyway.


I love my System X builds. VCO could use a little more range on the PWM but the filters sound utterly beautiful.

I'm a bit of a reclusive DIYer so I'm not well versed in all of the cooly stuffs out there. That said, is the brand name on those panels (Frequency Central) always done in mirror image/backwards?
drew
Quote:
is the brand name on those panels (Frequency Central) always done in mirror image/backwards?


FC sells the mirror image panels to diyers. If you buy complete modules the text is “the right way round”
Rex Coil 7
drew wrote:
Quote:
is the brand name on those panels (Frequency Central) always done in mirror image/backwards?


FC sells the mirror image panels to diyers. If you buy complete modules the text is “the right way round”
Thank you! cool
OB1
@GilgaFrank - I recognise yours from your YouTube video, which was one of the reasons I went for this build. Nice one :-)
midierror
heres my harmonic engine from circuitbenders in a whisky tin



https://www.circuitbenders.co.uk/forsale/harmonic/harmonic.html
GilgaFrank
OB1 wrote:
@GilgaFrank - I recognise yours from your YouTube video, which was one of the reasons I went for this build. Nice one :-)


The filters really capture that old Roland System 100 sound that we all love so dearly. No modular is complete without a dose of System X VCF!
OB1
Well, I'll have to do one of those now as well then, won't I?

hihi
BillLynes


Two more Turing Machines off the production line.
GilgaFrank
OB1 wrote:
Well, I'll have to do one of those now as well then, won't I?

:hihi:


At least one. The VCF is a much easier build than the VCO too as it obviously omits the tempco board.
OB1
Well, I've got all the bits for my second VCO and now the VCF arriving this week! I've only got a A-100G6 case at the moment and I have another filter (the Doepfer Wasp) already. I'm sure I'll expand at some point though!
33x3x33
Yu Synth- envelope vco vca lfo wavefolder + Moog filter clone
VCS 3- vco + filter
Thomas Henry- vco
8 step sequencers
12volt power supply
All built on proto board from schematics.
Joe.
The red lenses that came with the kit ended up turning the Blue LEDs I bought a lovely purple Dancing Star

Yes, I was too excited to put the nuts on before taking a photo razz



batchas
LoFi Junglist wrote:
The red lenses that came with the kit ended up turning the Blue LEDs I bought a lovely purple Dancing Star

Yes, I was too excited to put the nuts on before taking a photo razz

Wooa. Nice module. And useful too!
robpiya
Absolutely loving my journey into SDIY. The Befaco Rampage is my toughest yet. A lovely module to add to your rack with lots of functions. Have to say that the slider pots are really fun to play with and the logic processor section has some interesting options.


Pav
Miscreants LFO x2 Built for under a 15 squid.
mods: LEDs and DPDT switch with 3 Caps in parallel. no science behind choice of caps ..just leftovers from another project 100nf,22onf,and 1Uf.



GilgaFrank
Pav wrote:
Miscreants LFO x2 Built for under a 15 squid.
mods: LEDs and DPDT switch with 3 Caps in parallel. no science behind choice of caps ..just leftovers from another project 100nf,22onf,and 1Uf.


How's that Rigol DS1054Z working out for you? I love mine, especially after googling "RIGLOL" and installing all the software upgrades.

mome rath
Pav wrote:
Miscreants LFO x2 Built for under a 15 squid.
mods: LEDs and DPDT switch with 3 Caps in parallel. no science behind choice of caps ..just leftovers from another project 100nf,22onf,and 1Uf.





nice, I've got 8 of these yet to build
never did get around to it...
Pav
Rigol is just right for me...still only using a few % of its capability. I hope to advance to using two channels at a time real soon!

Mome Rathe, hi,

A couple of tips for when you do build ..I chose to use 16mm pots I had rather than source the 9mm ones recommended. As a consequence I could not use Julian's panels where the pot and sockets align vertically..I centred pot and offset the sockets. Adding the led and switch got me back some feng shui symmetry.

2nd I had only a 1mm clearance of the pot from Tl072 in its socket..not an issue with the 9mm but with hindsight I should get back clearance by not using an ic socket.
Rex Coil 7
Pav wrote:
...not an issue with the 9mm but with hindsight I should get back clearance by not using an ic socket.
If I were in the same position, I'd weigh the difference between the pot coming in scontact with the with IC socket vs the likelihood of having to remove/replace the IC (which a socket would make far simpler).

1mm is as good as 1km with these very low voltages we're dealing with in these little synth modules. 12v (or even 15v) isn't enough voltage to jump a 1mm air gap. Install a small insulator (a piece of black tape folded over on itself would do) between them if it would serve to ease your mind. The IC socket itself is insulated, it's just the metal contacts you need to concern yourself with.

cool

(please forgive misspellings, I've lost my glasses).

d'oh!
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
[(please forgive misspellings, I've lost my glasses).

d'oh!


Here's a little song to cheer you up:

CLee
Not a new build, but I made some SMT to DIP adapters out of PCBs and DIP sockets. I replaced some suspect CA3406 chips with new SMTs and it greatly improved the sound of my Yusynth 4U Mini Moog filter.



Rex Coil 7
^ nice bit of watchmaking going on there. thumbs up
Rex Coil 7
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
[(please forgive misspellings, I've lost my glasses).

d'oh!


Here's a little song to cheer you up:



HAA!!!! That's some entertaining stuff! Was that the Jethro Tull version? Very funny. Thanks for the lift.

BTW ... found them. They were right where I left them. lol

thumbs up
alanza


I'm working on a Yocto kit! Here's an (almost) finished I/O board! I made a deal with myself that if the power supply worked correctly the first time I powered it up, that I was allowed to build the main board by component value instead of by voice. It works, so let's hope the rest of it goes as smoothly! Currently I'm trying to figure out how to crimp wires..... hopefully using a smaller gauge than 18 will prove easier on the un-wrecked crimps that came with the Mouser BOM oops

Otherwise about a hundred down, just a few thousand terminals to go thumbs up
Rex Coil 7
alanza wrote:
..... build the main board by component value instead of by voice.
Help me out here, what do you mean by that?

alanza wrote:
.... Currently I'm trying to figure out how to crimp wires..... hopefully using a smaller gauge than 18 will prove easier on the un-wrecked crimps that came with the Mouser BOM ...
Are you referring to crimp on connectors? Or perhaps making multi pin headers with multiple wires in each connector?

Sorry, all I know about the Yocto is it's an 808 drum clone (at least I think that's what it is). Thanks for your patience.

we're not worthy
alanza
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
alanza wrote:
..... build the main board by component value instead of by voice.
Help me out here, what do you mean by that?
Ahahaha sorry, wouldn't be clear otherwise huh: the build guide for the Yocto presents two options: they suggest that the easier-to-troubleshoot way is to start by building part of the sequencer and then each voice (bass drum, hi hat, etc) in succession so you can test in stages. Or, they say, you could go buy component value (10K resistors, 12K etc), which will be faster but more challenging to fix if something goes wrong.

Rex Coil 7 wrote:
alanza wrote:
.... Currently I'm trying to figure out how to crimp wires..... hopefully using a smaller gauge than 18 will prove easier on the un-wrecked crimps that came with the Mouser BOM ...
Are you referring to crimp on connectors? Or perhaps making multi pin headers with multiple wires in each connector?
Both? both. I'm making several six- and four-pin connectors... or I will be when I get thinner wire. So the things I'm actually crimping are all metal and annoyingly small. If it comes down to it I suppose I could solder wire to board on both ends, but I figure it's a useful skill to learn. Dead Banana
StutzJr
I've run out of time for this weekend, just reached the halfway point of this build (first DIY eurorack - Befaco Rampage).
No major dramas so far, apart from soldering one of the IC sockets in backwards - I'm glad it was only the socket!




As a eurorack beginner I'm excited about this Rampage module becoming an important part of my setup.
So far I have a microbrute, pittsburgh SV1 blackbox, roland bitrazer and dreadbox hades.
I only just recently bought a tiptop HEK, makenoise LXD & intellijel triatt.

I plan on using the bitrazer as a DC coupled USB interface to VCVrack software.

Later on I plan on doing DIY builds of sonic potions Penrose & Mal-2.
Still considering options for a line input, multi VCA module and/or a more elaborate LPG like the RYO Aperture.
Rex Coil 7
StutzJr wrote:
I've run out of time for this weekend, just reached the halfway point of this build (first DIY eurorack - Befaco Rampage).
No major dramas so far, apart from soldering one of the IC sockets in backwards - I'm glad it was only the socket!




As a eurorack beginner I'm excited about this Rampage module becoming an important part of my setup.
So far I have a microbrute, pittsburgh SV1 blackbox, roland bitrazer and dreadbox hades.
I only just recently bought a tiptop HEK, makenoise LXD & intellijel triatt.

I plan on using the bitrazer as a DC coupled USB interface to VCVrack software.

Later on I plan on doing DIY builds of sonic potions Penrose & Mal-2.
Still considering options for a line input, multi VCA module and/or a more elaborate LPG like the RYO Aperture.
You're going to outrun the capabilities of that Happy Ending Kit very quickly at the rate you're going. Make designing a real power distribution system one of your earliest priorities. It's best to design your power distribution system to suit your expansion needs before settling on a cabinet, and then designing your cabinet to fit around the power system .... not the other way around. I'd strongly suggest avoiding the use of low priced switching PSUs, and forget anything with the phrase "ribbon cable" in it's description (as in soft busses). The Happy Ending Kit is ~ok~ for beginners and starting out, but the uZeus has some serious limits that cannot be worked around.

As I usually say, add up the net worth of all of your modules, and understand what is at stake when deciding which route to take when designing a power system. See what I mean there? Protect your future and protect your investment in your modules by accepting no less than the best power system your budget can withstand.

It's very easy to engineer a really bad switching PSU which costs less. It's far more costly to offer a really good switching power supply. So I'd suggest avoiding their use. Especially with power hungry digital modules which can also be very finicky and fussy about really good and clean power. Poorly implemented power systems will contribute to audible noise, cross talk (in certain systems you can actually hear modulators such as LFOs in the audio path), and tuning issues. Certain digital modules don't even operate properly with poorly designed power systems. There's any number of threads and posts regarding "problems with Make Noise Rene (or) Pressure Points" ..... "I have to lick my finger to make my Pressure Points work" ... and so on. These troubles generally point to crap for power problems.

Learn and understand what the difference between Zero Volt and Ground/Earth. They are not the same thing, and it is important to know the difference.

So resist the temptation to use crappy, low priced power systems. Most wall wart based systems display ripple and noise in their output, usually due to the use of half wave rectified power and inexpensive components. I am aware of exactly NO wall warts that were designed ground-up for modular synth use, something to keep in mind as you move forward. Invest in your synth's future and adopt, buy, build (whichever) the most solid power distribution system your wallet can tolerate. Estimate your power needs, then DOUBLE that figure as you calculate how much power to utilize. And again, your power system should not include anything that includes the phrase "ribbon cable" in it's description. I cannot stress these notions enough.

If you're really into DIY, you may even construct your own module power cables, as well. It is not difficult, and does not require "a $300 tool" to make them, either. Order the headers and the female pins, use 22ga PVC or better yet 20ga Teflon insulated 19 strand aircraft wire.

Bus bar distribution systems are the apex, but aren't totally necessary if you watch (very carefully) how you distribute your power. However if you're willing to either invest in prefabbed bus bars, or are so inclined to design and make your own, it's difficult to find anything more suited!

Taking everything said here, and compressing it into one statement ..... do not skimp on the power distribution system, or the PSU itself. It's the single least invested in area of most modular systems. Usually this is due to folks taking for granted that manufacturers are offering the best ways to go about powering synths. Most power systems are designed around a cost ceiling since the cost of proper power systems are the single largest deterrent for new users that are entertaining the idea of building modular systems. That said, many (most!) power systems are made as cheaply as possible to entice new customers into the field. Do not forget that.

Carry on.

thumbs up
flts






Still fighting with what seems like a really weird 0V and/or ground issue (no surprise considering quality and amount of wiring...), but it works, sounds ace, and I closed the case for now so I guess I can say it's "ready" now.

Panel is mine (painstakingly milled and engraved by julian / The Beast), the case made together with my father (I have my own tiny workshop and tools now but my skills are no match to his).

All PCBs are by Stroh Modular / J3RK who has helped a _LOT_ and beyond during the difficult parts of the journey - thank you!
CLee
Beautiful work! I love seeing unique one-off custom builds.
flts
CLee wrote:
Beautiful work! I love seeing unique on-off custom builds.


Thanks! The biggest part of fun for me these days _is_ doing something unique it seems - even though the modules themselves are designed by someone way more skilled than me.

(Coincidentally, next in line once I continue building modular stuff, is hopefully going to be a set of LW 4U modules, including your quantizer and 4U Orgone, with thebadproducer's panels on all of them - so a bit less unique and one-off... But before that I'm trying to design / develop something else myself!)
sduck
flts wrote:




Woah! That is fantastic! DIY of the year material!
Rex Coil 7
flts wrote:


Ok, screw it. I'm taking my ball and bat and going home.

I 2nd *sduck on the "DIY Of 2018" award, and we're not even 1/3rd through the year just yet.

Just the planning alone must have taken many man hours.

Superlative! thumbs up
batchas
@flts: made my day. Awesome.
And this wiring behind... Thanx for sharing we're not worthy

I also like the rear side very much. With all wires hidden behind while PCBs are face down as you have enough space, well fixed on a clean frame thumbs up
cygmu
I totally agree with all the applause for flts. I have been mentally cheering this one on since I first saw the panel, I can't remember where. Dustin's designs don't seem to get as much attention as they could but a build like this redresses the balance. Great work!
notmiserlouagain
@flts you made a wonderful musical instrument!
I´m atm working on something samesamebutdifferent, so I think I can relate to the amount of work going into conceptual design (power/gnd routing, functionality, playability and the especially awful everything-needs-more-space-than-you-had-thought phenomenon). Absolutly stunning for a moment and inspiring in the long run applause
cygmu wrote:
Dustin's designs don't seem to get as much attention as they could
Well, they get it from me certainly hyper
StutzJr
I must say, there sure are some impressive builds in this thread!

Rex Coil 7 wrote:
StutzJr wrote:
-snip-
You're going to outrun the capabilities of that Happy Ending Kit very quickly at the rate you're going. Make designing a real power distribution system one of your earliest priorities. It's best to design your power distribution system to suit your expansion needs before settling on a cabinet, and then designing your cabinet to fit around the power system .... not the other way around. I'd strongly suggest avoiding the use of low priced switching PSUs, and forget anything with the phrase "ribbon cable" in it's description (as in soft busses). The Happy Ending Kit is ~ok~ for beginners and starting out, but the uZeus has some serious limits that cannot be worked around.


Many thanks Rex Coil 7 for your time & effort in offering such detailed feedback! Your advice is noted and appreciated! I'll certainly take your comments on board in regards to selecting a solid power supply before planning any significant expansion.

No doubt you will have heard many of the following phrases uttered here in vain before, so I will repeat them here now for comedic effect:
    - My current "plan" does not involve filling the whole 84 HP of the HEK
    - Neither does it approach the rated load capacity of the uZues when virtually assembled in modulargrid
    (much of my current semi-modular gear is standalone and will not be "racked" any time soon)
    - I plan on selling a number of existing items before considering any changes to the above plan


Rex Coil 7 wrote:

As I usually say, add up the net worth of all of your modules, and understand what is at stake when deciding which route to take when designing a power system. See what I mean there? Protect your future and protect your investment in your modules by accepting no less than the best power system your budget can withstand.


fair advice!

Rex Coil 7 wrote:
It's very easy to engineer a really bad switching PSU which costs less. It's far more costly to offer a really good switching power supply. So I'd suggest avoiding their use. Especially with power hungry digital modules which can also be very finicky and fussy about really good and clean power. Poorly implemented power systems will contribute to audible noise, cross talk (in certain systems you can actually hear modulators such as LFOs in the audio path), and tuning issues. Certain digital modules don't even operate properly with poorly designed power systems. There's any number of threads and posts regarding "problems with Make Noise Rene (or) Pressure Points" ..... "I have to lick my finger to make my Pressure Points work" ... and so on. These troubles generally point to crap for power problems.

Learn and understand what the difference between Zero Volt and Ground/Earth. They are not the same thing, and it is important to know the difference.

So resist the temptation to use crappy, low priced power systems. Most wall wart based systems display ripple and noise in their output, usually due to the use of half wave rectified power and inexpensive components. I am aware of exactly NO wall warts that were designed ground-up for modular synth use, something to keep in mind as you move forward. Invest in your synth's future and adopt, buy, build (whichever) the most solid power distribution system your wallet can tolerate. Estimate your power needs, then DOUBLE that figure as you calculate how much power to utilize. And again, your power system should not include anything that includes the phrase "ribbon cable" in it's description. I cannot stress these notions enough.

Understood. As claimed above, was not planning to grow too much at this point. May need to rethink this, especially if the DIY thing continues to progress well.

Rex Coil 7 wrote:

If you're really into DIY, you may even construct your own module power cables, as well. It is not difficult, and does not require "a $300 tool" to make them, either. Order the headers and the female pins, use 22ga PVC or better yet 20ga Teflon insulated 19 strand aircraft wire.

I've made ribbon cables before, just used my garage vice with soft jaws, no problem.

Rex Coil 7 wrote:

Bus bar distribution systems are the apex, but aren't totally necessary if you watch (very carefully) how you distribute your power. However if you're willing to either invest in prefabbed bus bars, or are so inclined to design and make your own, it's difficult to find anything more suited!

As an aside, what is to stop somebody slapping a secondhand computer PSU (a quiet one) under the bench and powering a bus bar from the ATX connector?
I guess the answer to that is to plug my earphones in to a desktop pc's front headphone jack, turn up the volume and listen to the "silence"..

Rex Coil 7 wrote:

Taking everything said here, and compressing it into one statement ..... do not skimp on the power distribution system, or the PSU itself. It's the single least invested in area of most modular systems. Usually this is due to folks taking for granted that manufacturers are offering the best ways to go about powering synths. Most power systems are designed around a cost ceiling since the cost of proper power systems are the single largest deterrent for new users that are entertaining the idea of building modular systems. That said, many (most!) power systems are made as cheaply as possible to entice new customers into the field. Do not forget that.

Carry on.

thumbs up


Cheers Rex!
elmegil
StutzJr wrote:
As an aside, what is to stop somebody slapping a secondhand computer PSU (a quiet one) under the bench and powering a bus bar from the ATX connector?
I guess the answer to that is to plug my earphones in to a desktop pc's front headphone jack, turn up the volume and listen to the "silence"..


Yeah, good luck finding a "quiet" one smile
morocco_dave
I've finally made the move from DIY-ing on stripboard and have had some PCBs made for projects that receive the most traffic on my website. So, this month I've been putting prototypes together.

Active MIDI through box




Arduino-based 4-note paraphonic string synth euro module


A really simple power distro board




What's the appropriate place on Muff to announce PCBs/kits for sale? ;-)
J3RK
flts wrote:






Still fighting with what seems like a really weird 0V and/or ground issue (no surprise considering quality and amount of wiring...), but it works, sounds ace, and I closed the case for now so I guess I can say it's "ready" now.

Panel is mine (painstakingly milled and engraved by julian / The Beast), the case made together with my father (I have my own tiny workshop and tools now but my skills are no match to his).

All PCBs are by Stroh Modular / J3RK who has helped a _LOT_ and beyond during the difficult parts of the journey - thank you!


Absolutely beautiful!! I've been very excited hearing about the progress with this.

applause
alanza
morocco_dave wrote:
I've finally made the move from DIY-ing on stripboard and have had some PCBs made for projects that receive the most traffic on my website. So, this month I've been putting prototypes together.

Active MIDI through box




I have no need for this, but it's REAL cute! Love the panel aesthetics.

morocco_dave wrote:

Arduino-based 4-note paraphonic string synth euro module


Gonna go have a root around your website about this one, I'm intrigued! That panel with Sifam knobs... yum.
balbibou
This one is now ready ! Finished it yesterday w00t
Thanks jbdiver for the eps file...




SlayerBadger!
soup
flts wrote:


This looks fucking fantastic! It's peanut butter jelly time!
Isaiah
flts
Stunning work!

Could you give us a description of the Stroh modules you used and maybe some closeup photos please?
flts
Isaiah wrote:
Could you give us a description of the Stroh modules you used and maybe some closeup photos please?


Certainly! There are some additional (crappy cellphone) photos here, including a big bunch of board / panel pics from earlier build phases... so I won't fill up the thread with big pictures:

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/e67kzpvutajlbkb/AABoAvS79gY8_DF0nLqnw5ZUa?d l=0

Left to right, top row:

- Passive 3,5mm <-> nana adapters and 0V
- BitStation: LFSR / random (think Noise Ring or Turing Machine)
- UltraFlop 4U: sequencer
- Stereo Out / Dual VCA

Bottom row:

- UltraClock: V/oct VCO with run/stop switch and a clock divider
- Unopole + DXOR: XOR logic gate + 1-pole VC slew / filter
- Dual Angle & OR: two linear AD/AR looping envelopes + combined OR mix
- Flexwave VCO: dual / complex VCO
- UltraTimbre: Buchla Timbre style wavefolder (the diode wavefolder in Flexwave is actually just replaced with this one in the panel)
- MultiMix: bipolar CV mixer with offset, and an (AC coupled) audio mixer
- Optogates: 2x non-resonant LPGs
- Pico VCO
ashleym
flts wrote:


Still fighting with what seems like a really weird 0V and/or ground issue (no surprise considering quality and amount of wiring...), but it works, sounds ace, and I closed the case for now so I guess I can say it's "ready" now.

Panel is mine (painstakingly milled and engraved by julian / The Beast), the case made together with my father (I have my own tiny workshop and tools now but my skills are no match to his).

All PCBs are by Stroh Modular / J3RK who has helped a _LOT_ and beyond during the difficult parts of the journey - thank you!


Really impressed.

Colour thumbs up
Bananas thumbs up
Layout thumbs up
The fact you’ve got an original and interesting layout wins build of the year. Everyone else, give up now!!

After all this hard work, does the layout work? Are you happy with it?
batchas
flts wrote:
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/e67kzpvutajlbkb/AABoAvS79gY8_DF0nLqnw5ZUa?d l=0

Again, awesome.
Unique.

No marking for pots = surprise = shows me that a panel can look good without.
flts
Heh. As my mother said (well, she didn't, but she would if asked), it's no competition. It's just fun to get things done (and this took a long time and several iterations to "get done"), and warm thanks for all the positive comments, but I'm now a bit ashamed of this attracting so much interest.

I do agree that Dustin's designs deserve a LOT more attention based on this experience, but I'd like to add that that's actually the part that DOES deserve the attention - my part is just a lot of handiwork and stealing good ideas from others.

FWIW I'd probably rather give "DIY of the year" award to those people who actually design and prototype their own circuits, and then finish it off with self-cut slabs of aluminum and oldschool dymo labels. It looks rad and you've actually done something creative with the sound side of things instead of looks / ergonomics (obviously looks / ergonomics matter a lot to me, but I have a constant inferiority complex of not having the focus and patience to learn more electronics design...).

So far I've just either bought PCBs and made a little mods of my own or stolen public domain circuits and built stuff with them. I'm envious of people who actually do their own stuff from (relatively speaking) ground up, which is what I'll probably just try next, albeit in the digital domain.

(Also FWIW, if you're looking for what inspired the look for this one - look no further than CES Ed-Lab electronics trainers and Wiard 300 modules... Former I don't have, the latter I have some of)

And yeah, so far the panel layout feels very sensible - I haven't had a chance to spend that much time patching with yet but so far there are no big changes I'd make if I started designing the panel again.
Rex Coil 7
morocco_dave wrote:
....What's the appropriate place on Muff to announce PCBs/kits for sale? ;-)
The "For Sale/Trade" sub forum. But you're not eligible to sell anything yet since you have fewer than 100 posts. I'd suggest reading the rules in the FS/T forum, look at the top of the forum's main page where certain threads are "stickied", and you'll find the FS/T sub forum's rules.

Here's a little help, link to the For Sale/Trade sub forum rules thread .....

https://www.muffwiggler.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=34546

Also, note that posting "new products" and the like are also restricted. Here's a quote for the rules thread .....

"- POST IN THE RIGHT PLACE! Do not post 'For Sale', 'For Trade' or 'Want To Buy' threads or posts outside the relevant subforums. They will be deleted. "

We seem to be seeing a bit of a rash of new members posting "new products release" threads in forums other than the FS/T sub forum, especially by newer members. This happens now and then, which forces the moderators and administrators to lean in a bit harder regarding enforcement.

cool
flts
Btw. people do announce new "community projects" (interest checks, PCB and panel sales etc.) on this subforum, take orders and receive money for their designs.

I assume that's up to the same 100 post rule as well, but there is an exception for PCBs / panels / kits that you are actually allowed to advertise them on this subforum if they are your own designs.
Rex Coil 7
flts wrote:
Btw. people do announce new "community projects" (interest checks, PCB and panel sales etc.) on this subforum, take orders and receive money for their designs.

I assume that's up to the same 100 post rule as well, but there is an exception for PCBs / panels / kits that you are actually allowed to advertise them on this subforum if they are your own designs.
OK, thanks!
flts
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
flts wrote:
Btw. people do announce new "community projects" (interest checks, PCB and panel sales etc.) on this subforum, take orders and receive money for their designs.

I assume that's up to the same 100 post rule as well, but there is an exception for PCBs / panels / kits that you are actually allowed to advertise them on this subforum if they are your own designs.
OK, thanks!


To add to the previous post, I'm not a moderator or an authority of any kind, that's just an observation seeing that there are constantly interest checks, order threads and advertisements from various people selling PCBs / panels / kits of the projects they've designed. I'm not sure if there's a written rule for that case or not.

(I'm just assuming that the same 100 post rule applies there, and there's sort of a gentlemanly rule that you may only advertise something "provided to the community" and something you've designed yourself or are acting directly on behalf of the designer)
morocco_dave
flts wrote:
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
flts wrote:
Btw. people do announce new "community projects" (interest checks, PCB and panel sales etc.) on this subforum, take orders and receive money for their designs.

I assume that's up to the same 100 post rule as well, but there is an exception for PCBs / panels / kits that you are actually allowed to advertise them on this subforum if they are your own designs.
OK, thanks!


To add to the previous post, I'm not a moderator or an authority of any kind, that's just an observation seeing that there are constantly interest checks, order threads and advertisements from various people selling PCBs / panels / kits of the projects they've designed. I'm not sure if there's a written rule for that case or not.

(I'm just assuming that the same 100 post rule applies there, and there's sort of a gentlemanly rule that you may only advertise something "provided to the community" and something you've designed yourself or are acting directly on behalf of the designer)


Thanks for the very useful information, folks - I knew asking rather than just blatting online store URLs all over the place would turn out to be the right thing to do!
av500
Built a Chaos Divider from Tsyklon Labs

Rex Coil 7
morocco_dave wrote:
flts wrote:
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
flts wrote:
Btw. people do announce new "community projects" (interest checks, PCB and panel sales etc.) on this subforum, take orders and receive money for their designs.

I assume that's up to the same 100 post rule as well, but there is an exception for PCBs / panels / kits that you are actually allowed to advertise them on this subforum if they are your own designs.
OK, thanks!


To add to the previous post, I'm not a moderator or an authority of any kind, that's just an observation seeing that there are constantly interest checks, order threads and advertisements from various people selling PCBs / panels / kits of the projects they've designed. I'm not sure if there's a written rule for that case or not.

(I'm just assuming that the same 100 post rule applies there, and there's sort of a gentlemanly rule that you may only advertise something "provided to the community" and something you've designed yourself or are acting directly on behalf of the designer)


Thanks for the very useful information, folks - I knew asking rather than just blatting online store URLs all over the place would turn out to be the right thing to do!
Good judgement call on your part. Behaving like grown ass adults is usually the best recourse, as you've demonstrated.

cool
sduck
morocco_dave wrote:

What's the appropriate place on Muff to announce PCBs/kits for sale? ;-)


You can post links to your site and sell stuff there in this forum. We would prefer if you didn't sell PCB and DIY related stuff here directly via the PM system until you have over 100 posts. (speaking as a moderator) - the rules for selling stuff are here - https://www.muffwiggler.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=34546 - note that this subforum is a bit loose on those rules, people sell PCBs and kits here fairly frequently.
Rex Coil 7
My apologies for raising any dust on this subject. I'm afraid that my confusion on the issue did nothing but create even more confusion about it all. I've been properly counseled on it since then, and now understand both the letter and the spirit of the terms of service and rules regarding promotion, new product announcements, and sale of items in the various subforums as well as the difference between new product announcements and the sale of individual pieces of gear posted in the FS/T forums.

Having said that, I'll stick to learning and lurking here. I take full responsibility for having rocked the boat, all I can say is I suppose I simply had one of these moments ......



Now that this has been settled, I hope the thread can proceed on topic without further interruptions. Thanks for the help and consideration on this.

cool
jwhtn
Obviously no modular synth is ever finished, but this marks the completion of phase one of my first foray into synths.



From left to right:

    Synthrotek TST module (free with purchase last Black Friday)
    NLC Dual VCO
    NLC LPG
    Passive mixer/mult module
    Saturn V rocket diagram to take up 3hp
    Passive attenuator module
    Timo's Ian Fritz AD/AR
    Music Thing Turing Machine w/Volts expander
    NLC Sloth and Super Sloth in the same faceplate
    NLC Dual LFO
    Barton VCA/Mix


Panels are backpainted acrylic reverse etched on the paint side for labels and cut at my library's makerspace. Case was cut there, too, adapted from the THX2112 design.

The first thing I thought when it finally started making noise was just how damned goooood it sounded.
BillLynes


Next up....

DIY Polivoks VCO II
Rex Coil 7
jwhtn wrote:
....
Saturn V rocket diagram to take up 3hp
Killer.
beautyofdecay_
Finished my 5U version of Branches.

plugugly


I got a wild hair today and decided to build some probes. Tooled brass, RG58 center conductor, salvaged Pomona stackable bananas, and of course...Pentel RSVP's.
GrantB








gbiz
Back when i had my Roland System100, half of it was invariably used as a percussion synth, run from the sequencer. I always loved that Being Boiled era Human League type percussive sound that the System 100 is so good at. I've been long been meaning to do a SMD euro version of the System100 filter with a mezzanine noise board attached so i can do the same ....

The noise board has an attiny13a running a couple of lfsr's. Output from those is filtered to produce low & high frequency noise outputs that are normalled into the two inputs of the filter. Obviously the filter without the noise board can be used as just a filter.

Excuse the sorry state of the wiring etc. smile





Rex Coil 7
YIKES!!!!!! eek! Great googly moogly! Excellent workmanship!

Am I seeing concentric pots/knobs or are those unusual knobs?

The time you've clearly invested was worth it. Inspiring work.

GrantB wrote:








GrantB
Rex Coil 7 wrote:

Am I seeing concentric pots/knobs or are those unusual knobs?


Thanks, feels good to be back in the saddle. I built two panels back in 2013 and since then many things have got in the way of DIY: new house/job/wife/baby/repairing vintage stuff/attempting to actually music bla bla bla.

Those knobs are Davies 1910 which are commonly seen on the old paperface systems with 1" spacing. Davies 1900 are the common Serge knob for the 3/4" vertical spacing.

Here are the photos I really wanted to post yesterday, but I found out the hard way that my Bud boats are ever so slightly smaller than the panels. My cheeks were clenched too tight! Today I made some acrylic shims for the sides of the boats, et voilà:





Only 9 more panels to go! MY ASS IS BLEEDING
elmegil
Very nice job and very nice troubleshooting the cabinet smile
GrantB
elmegil wrote:
Very nice job and very nice troubleshooting the cabinet smile


Thank you, though "cabinet" may be too strong a word. One of my coworkers made a round table out of maple ply and those end cheeks are the offcuts. Totally eyeballed it. Came out pretty nice considering, but I'll make a real cabinet someday after I finish those 9 more panels.
beautyofdecay_
Nothing wrong with that cabinet.
Just a couple of layers of stain and its perfect! cool
Rex Coil 7
beautyofdecay_ wrote:
Nothing wrong with that cabinet.
Just a couple of layers of (truck bedliner) and its perfect! cool
cool Corrected. thumbs up
Jarno
Interesting, but do you just ping the filter with a trigger, or do you use an envelope generator?

gbiz wrote:
Back when i had my Roland System100, half of it was invariably used as a percussion synth, run from the sequencer. I always loved that Being Boiled era Human League type percussive sound that the System 100 is so good at. I've been long been meaning to do a SMD euro version of the System100 filter with a mezzanine noise board attached so i can do the same ....

The noise board has an attiny13a running a couple of lfsr's. Output from those is filtered to produce low & high frequency noise outputs that are normalled into the two inputs of the filter. Obviously the filter without the noise board can be used as just a filter.

Excuse the sorry state of the wiring etc. smile





Rex Coil 7
Jarno wrote:
Interesting, but do you just ping the filter with a trigger, or do you use an envelope generator?
I see people using the word "ping" now and then. What does this mean?
Jarno
Well, if you turn up the resonance of a VCF to the point where it just doesn't self-oscillate, and send it a short peak of control voltage, it will make a noise which dies down again. But I wonder how big a burst of control voltage you need to give it, and whether it can be a very short gate, or needs to be something more "pointy".
gbiz
Jarno wrote:
Interesting, but do you just ping the filter with a trigger, or do you use an envelope generator?


Envelope generator. A small amount of attack works well for the sound i'm looking for.

I hadn't considered trying to ping it until you questioned it. It doesn't look like this one does.
Rex Coil 7
gbiz wrote:
Jarno wrote:
Interesting, but do you just ping the filter with a trigger, or do you use an envelope generator?


Envelope generator. A small amount of attack works well for the sound i'm looking for.

I hadn't considered trying to ping it until you questioned it. It doesn't look like this one does.
By "small amount of attack" do you mean you are increasing the attack time to soften the attack, just enough to make the filter cutoff and resonance sortof "blip"? Or do you mean a fast attack and a small amount of decay time?
sduck
A "ping" can be any number of different things in this application. You could use a trigger signal raw, or attenuated, or a gate, or an EG, with or without attenuation. It's really just a matter of taste, depending on the musical situation. Experiment, season to taste.
Rex Coil 7
sduck wrote:
A "ping" can be any number of different things in this application. You could use a trigger signal raw, or attenuated, or a gate, or an EG, with or without attenuation. It's really just a matter of taste, depending on the musical situation. Experiment, season to taste.
So ~ping~ = modulate the cutoff with some sort of one shot? ... got it.
gbiz
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
gbiz wrote:
Jarno wrote:
Interesting, but do you just ping the filter with a trigger, or do you use an envelope generator?


Envelope generator. A small amount of attack works well for the sound i'm looking for.

By "small amount of attack" do you mean you are increasing the attack time to soften the attack, just enough to make the filter cutoff and resonance sortof "blip"? Or do you mean a fast attack and a small amount of decay time?


Yes, just enough attack to soften the initial spike of the envelope. There is decay, probably more than you'd use for emulating something like a snare or hi-hat.
The resonance isn't set high enough for the filter to "blip" by itself, it needs the noise as the sound source, the resonance is just adding colouring.
search64
So much for the easy part. Next up: 208p...

zorglub76
I kicked into hyperproduction these first three months.
* Micro o_C
* Discrete SVVCF
* Grids
* Rings
* Pulses + Volts
* Spring Reverb
* 2x Zlob's Dual VCAs
* 2x Zlob's MiniMix
* Zlob's MiniAtt
* 3x Pure VCO
* 2x Peaks
* ZeroScope
* Shruthi XT with 4PM filter
+ this cardboard case, and I'm waiting some parts to finish Elements and Ripples....
+ I source parts on my own

screaming goo yo

ashleym
gbiz wrote:
I always loved that Being Boiled era Human League type percussive sound that the System 100 is so good at.



With that you are now voted correct in everything you say.

The System 100 12 step sequencer explains a few of their 3/4 time tunes.

Did you manually filter open and close for the different drum sounds?
gbiz
ashleym wrote:
gbiz wrote:
I always loved that Being Boiled era Human League type percussive sound that the System 100 is so good at.


With that you are now voted correct in everything you say.



smile

Quote:

Did you manually filter open and close for the different drum sounds?


There's 3 CVs on that filter, so no real need to, but yes. And the HPF. That's a key part of that sound.
Laughing
Achievement get!

Actually have a case to put 5U/MOTM modules into! It's got 20U of space, as I understand it, and the Klee would already take up half of it! (Thank goodness that's got it's own case that I found for $5)



Didn't realize it, but my phone's camera is actually really shit.
beautyofdecay_
Laughing wrote:
Didn't realize it, but my phone's camera is actually really shit.

The camera probably isn't *that* shitty. The lighting is wink

Tip: don't use the flash and take the picture in natural light for example in front of a window.
Rex Coil 7
beautyofdecay_ wrote:
Laughing wrote:
Didn't realize it, but my phone's camera is actually really shit.

The camera probably isn't *that* shitty. The lighting is wink

Tip: don't use the flash and take the picture in natural light for example in front of a window.
+1 ... lighting makes all the difference when taking photos. Natural or not, placement of lighting is super important. Keep moving the lights around, look though the viewfinder/screen of whatever you're using to take pictures with at the subject, look carefully for lens flare, glare, dark areas, overlit areas, and so on. Move the lights or the subject until the lighting is ~right~. Then SNAP! Take a lot of pictures from slightly different angles. You may have to use a photo-program of sorts to crop any unwanted junk that got in the capture. You may also have to resize the image. A little time and effort put into it produces really nice results.

thumbs up
Rex Coil 7
Laughing wrote:
Achievement get!


Whut? hmmm.....

Laughing wrote:
... Actually have a case to put 5U/MOTM modules into! It's got 20U of space, as I understand it ...

Nice case! Where did you get those mounting rails? I've been looking for full length 5U rails for some time (I've done workarounds and no longer need the rails since I installed T-Nuts in the predrilled module mounting holes of the cabinets I used) ... but still ... nice cab! Nice rails!

thumbs up
evengravy
Here's my VCS3 inspired case, built myself out of walnut and mostly featuring Serge euro from R*S and a few modules of my own (SEM filter, Buchla Wavefolder, ARP 4023 etc.)
J3RK
Love that case!
Laughing
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
+1 ... lighting makes all the difference when taking photos. Natural or not, placement of lighting is super important. Keep moving the lights around, look though the viewfinder/screen of whatever you're using to take pictures with at the subject, look carefully for lens flare, glare, dark areas, overlit areas, and so on. Move the lights or the subject until the lighting is ~right~. Then SNAP! Take a lot of pictures from slightly different angles. You may have to use a photo-program of sorts to crop any unwanted junk that got in the capture. You may also have to resize the image. A little time and effort put into it produces really nice results.

thumbs up


Heh, well now I've got the light of day to make a difference! I was more referring to zooming in on it and seeing how grainy it was, but I suppose that's a problem no matter what picture you zoom in on, like a painted model.



Now the rails might actually be, as you put it, a workaround, really.



I was introduced to angle aluminum as a method for mounting boards, but tapping them would not only be a bitch, but probably not entirely reliable in the long run. I drilled out holes at as-precise-as-I-could-get spacings with the help of a compass and a good ruler, and then gave it the secret weapon... Pem-Nuts! Old HP test equipment made ubiquitous use of pem-nuts to hold the panels to the frames of their test equipment, and now I'm doing the same, since I know where to find the nuts. Just drill a 3/8's hole, line up the nut, and SMACK it in with a hammer, and it's like I've got a tapped hole. A place called the Olander company has a store nearby that I can get these at, with the item code here: http://www.olander.com/default.aspx?page=item%20detail&itemcode=CS632- 1 if you want to give it a try. With this, I can make rails to fit any size I want, really. Could even have an 8' wide cabinet if I really wanted.
Laughing
evengravy wrote:
Here's my VCS3 inspired case, built myself out of walnut and mostly featuring Serge euro from R*S and a few modules of my own (SEM filter, Buchla Wavefolder, ARP 4023 etc.)


Very nice! See, I wish I could make wood look that good when I join it together.
evengravy
Thanks gents! thumbs up
evengravy
here's a goike inspired 6U i'm working on too, was to be for sale but I'm becoming pretty attached to it so I may have to keep it help
evengravy
Quote:
pem-nuts to hold the panels to the frames of their test equipment, and now I'm doing the same
ooh, thanks for the head up on those, excellent! That's a new one on me
Rex Coil 7
I'm not certain about this, but I believe it's a first for this entire forum!

Pem nuts appear to be the "for metal" counterpart to T-Nuts. I did pretty much the exact same thing, but in wood.





I was told by resident experts (ahem) that I'd never EVER be able to get them properly aligned. HA! Worked out GREAT! Installed 88 of those things.

Pem nuts, T nuts ... whatever!!!

thumbs up
Jarno
Well, I hated those things, tried the one you used, and the screw in variety, never got them properly aligned, and they always tended to wind up crooked (mine were a few sizes up, to mount the artificial climbing pieces on my indoor climbing wall, ah yes, the old days). Good job for getting them all in well aligned! thumbs up

evengravy wrote:
Here's my VCS3 inspired case, built myself out of walnut and mostly featuring Serge euro from R*S and a few modules of my own (SEM filter, Buchla Wavefolder, ARP 4023 etc.)


WOW! That looks great!

Here's my build, first one of the long easter weekend:

It's not a cracklebox, it's a crackleblock grin
A small touch noisemaker, based on the work by Michel Waisvisz.
Site


Two pieces of hollowed out 18mm plywood, which hold the speaker and battery. Didn't feel like firing up the Skil saw so I just used pieces I had. Could be a little bit smaller grin

Great fun!
Rex Coil 7
the second image is not showing up .... there's a failure message in it's place.
Jarno
Hmmm, maybe an Imgur site thing, it does show up now.
Rex Coil 7
Jarno wrote:
Hmmm, maybe an Imgur site thing, it does show up now.
Nerp .... still broken .... screenshot taken as of timestamp of this reply.



seriously, i just don't get it seriously, i just don't get it seriously, i just don't get it seriously, i just don't get it
sduck
??? it's working for me.

But, to make things easier in the future, just use the Upload Picture feature of this forum - top right above the comment box. Works every time!
Rex Coil 7
It must be NASA, their holographic projectors that hide the fact the Earth is flat are acting up causing Facebook's data mining tech to foul up and make my computer glitch up, which in turn makes it so I cannot see the picture. Added to that, Chemtrails are causing area-wide failures of internet service in my area, which is ... again ... NASA and their ceaseless efforts to cover up factual information that the Earth is flat.

Since NASA uses holograms and holographics to project fake aircraft traffic (after all, airliners are not real, nor are satellites, or the stars .... more crappy holograms to fool us that space is real) ... and this broken photo link is proving that NASA is controlling everything and now and then their technology fails. Since there are only twelve satellites (not thousands) when one is failing they have to send up a military jet fighter to capture the failing satellite and replace it by Sunup so no one can see what they are doing. They'll use the failed satellite as a prop to fake the Chinese space station falling to Earth so NASA can keep up with the fake "space is real" story. The failed satellite will fall to the ground, and they'll tell us it was the Chinese space station just to keep all of you SHEEP believing that space is real and we have space stations and satellites in orbit. The space station head fake will also serve to keep up the fake narrative that gravity is also real, when the REAL TRUTH is that NASA is controlled by lizard people that want us to believe that space is real, gravity is real, and the mathematics we were all taught in school is real, but it's FAKE. Fake math and FAKE science has fooled all of you SHEEP that believe space is real, and the LSD they put in chemtrails has all of your minds messed up. No man made space vehicles have ever broken through the FIRMAMENT DOME, the DOME which NASA doesn't want anyone to know about. SO space is fake, aircraft are fake, the stars are fake, satellites are fake, and all of you SHEEP believe the NASA LIES!

Anyone that pushes back against me is just a paid shill, taking a monthly check from NASA to keep up the LIES and keep on FOOLING the SHEEP by insisting the Earth is round, but it's not, it's FLAT! The UN protects the outer rim from anyone finding out the truth about the FLAT EARTH, there are ten million battleships that keep anyone from getting too close to the outer rim of the FLAT EARTH, and are killed on sight.

Oh wait .... sorry, I forgot which forum I am in. I thought this was The World Of Batshit video comments section. I gotta go, must get back to telling the REALITY TRUTH about the FLAT EARTH on yoo toob in the comments. I'm just a messenger of THE REAL TRUTH .... THE EARTH IS FLAT .... NASA IS LIARS!

(dammit, I forgot to take my meds again .... )

lol lol lol

ADDENDUM: There is actually a contingent of human beings that actually espouse everything I posted above ..... I am not among their numbers. Now, where did I put my monthly check from NASA?

applause
Rex Coil 7
Laughing wrote:



.... the secret weapon... Pem-Nuts! Old HP test equipment made ubiquitous use of pem-nuts to hold the panels to the frames of their test equipment, and now I'm doing the same, since I know where to find the nuts. Just drill a 3/8's hole, line up the nut, and SMACK it in with a hammer, and it's like I've got a tapped hole. A place called the Olander company has a store nearby that I can get these at, with the item code here: http://www.olander.com/default.aspx?page=item%20detail&itemcode=CS632- 1 if you want to give it a try. With this, I can make rails to fit any size I want, really. Could even have an 8' wide cabinet if I really wanted.
I took some time to check out those Pem Nuts .... really nice solution! Their website has MANY different types and styles, just choose to suit your situation.

Link = https://www.pemnet.com/fastening-products/nuts-for-sheetmetal/

So thanks again for the really cool option. In all of my years metalworking I've never seen those used in DIY. I always thought they were installed by some kind of automated system with fixtures and high pressure pressing machines. Steel ruler, a hammer, and a drill, along with a careful eye .... done!

Good stuff, Maynard!

Happy Easter Weekend ....

It's peanut butter jelly time!
Rex Coil 7
Re; T-nuts used in wooden synth cabs ......

Jarno wrote:
Well, I hated those things, tried the one you used, and the screw in variety, never got them properly aligned, and they always tended to wind up crooked (mine were a few sizes up, to mount the artificial climbing pieces on my indoor climbing wall, ah yes, the old days). Good job for getting them all in well aligned! thumbs up
Thanks! It was all a matter of using synth panels as "mandrels" to make sure I kept the nuts aligned as I moved across the cabinet. Did the whole thing on the floor of my kitchen. I'd very lightly press a T-nut into position, with the cleats (barbs?) of the T-nut just barely sunk into the wood. Then, with a business card inserted between two panels, insert a panel screw into a module hole, and use the screw to ~draw~ or pull the t-nut into position. This helped to make certain the t-nut was properly located. The module screw would only pull the t-nut into the wood just so far before the synth panel would begin to bend, so I stopped at that point and used a small c-clamp that was clamped on to the t-nut on one side and the wooden cab on the other. Then carefully tighten the c-clamp down to completely sink the t-nut's barbs into the wood and properly seat it into it's hole.

A dab of Gorilla Glue was then applied, just to keep the t-nuts in place securely when there isn't a module screw holding it in it's hole.

All done, centered, and nice 'n straight. All of the module screws spin right in with just my fingers when mounting modules.

My only regret was I did not take the time to locate stainless steel T-Nuts. They are available, it just takes a bit of doing to locate them in the required size (6-32) without getting gouged on the cost. Beyond those, every other single piece of hardware is either stainless steel or aluminum on my synth. Well, there's also a little bit of wood involved, as well as a bit of wire.

lol


Took three evenings (bent over in a hunch, installing/uninstalling synth panels, installing the T-nuts, drilling holes, and so on.... got my back and neck all bound up!). So I took my time, breaking up the job into three nights work. In the end it all worked out great!





In the image above, you can see how I spaced the modules apart to make sure I got the t-nuts installed properly. Knowing that the MU module dimensions call for a 0.010" (ten thousandths of an inch) gap between each module, I used business cards as spacers. Most quality business cards are ~roughly~ 0.010" thick. So that worked out well.

Close enough for government work (as we used to say).

cool
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
I just gotta say, the DIYers on this forum are really lifting the bar this year. It is now more or less impossible to tell amateur efforts from professional ones (unless you're looking at my stuff -- it still looks very amateurish). It's a little scary.
Rex Coil 7
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
I just gotta say, the DIYers on this forum are really lifting the bar this year. It is now more or less impossible to tell amateur efforts from professional ones (unless you're looking at my stuff -- it still looks very amateurish). It's a little scary.
I hear ya! eek!

I mean (for instance), that Pem Nut solution is THE SHIT! It looks as though it was made in a mass production factory. Clean, aligned, and just plain old TRICK LOOKING. I've been doing some research on the use of those. I'd like to adopt their use, for sure.

hmmm.....
appliancide
This is hardly worthy of a post, but given the date...

notmiserlouagain
appliancide wrote:
This is hardly worthy of a post, but given the date...


I´m in for two razz
Reese P. Dubin
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
I just gotta say, the DIYers on this forum are really lifting the bar this year. It is now more or less impossible to tell amateur efforts from professional ones (unless you're looking at my stuff -- it still looks very amateurish). It's a little scary.


I think well done DIY trumps factory builds every time. Lots of people go so completely beyond that i always joke to myself that they are planning on their stuff going into space. I make mine nice but i bash around a lot for gigs and change my mind often so have arrived at a nice standard for where I am not destroying great art when I cut a panel in half with an angle grinder.
flts
1) Way way back in music high school my classmate's father (who is one of the higher profile classical / art music composers in Finland) did a little graduation speech for us about professionals vs. hobbyists... I suppose his main point was something like "choose wisely: hobbyist musicians often envy professionals because they can do what they love full time - and professionals often envy hobbyists because they can do whatever the fuck they want without having to think about getting paid for the next song / gig" (which is, coincidentally, the exact thing why I never pursued a career in music / audio, aside the fact that I'm a talentless hack)

2) A veteran recording engineer (Fletcher? Albini?) said in an interview that what ultimately separates a "professional" from a hobbyist is that a professional delivers consistent results above a certain expected level all / most of the time - pay him for a gig and you know the end result may or may not be stellar, but there's an implicit guarantee it will not completely suck either.

I suppose those ideas apply to to professional / factory built vs. DIY stuff as well... If you're manufacturing synths for living (or at very least as a "jobby") you have to hold up a certain standard and actually produce something in numbers economically (relatively speaking) to get paid. Or if you're doing it for yourself for fun, you can either slap something half-working batshit crazy quickly on a stripboard, put it behind a cardboard panel labeled with a sharpie and call it a day, spend years and thousands working on a single Synth Of Your Dreams -tm-, or whatever the hell you feel like doing.

Edit: I guess this is one of those "to the obviousmobile!"-type things to many, but something I hadn't really thought about very much at all back then...
Rex Coil 7
First off, I hope everyone has enjoyed this Easter weekend. Ours was a wonderful return to familiar traditions.

I may have used the wrong wording to express my admiration for the use of Pem Nuts when I was praising the way it looked. I simply meant to express that it looked very much like it was done with machine-like precision. There, that better?

Fin. thumbs up
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
flts wrote:
1) Way way back in music high school my classmate's father (who is one of the higher profile classical / art music composers in Finland) did a little graduation speech for us about professionals vs. hobbyists... I suppose his main point was something like "choose wisely: hobbyist musicians often envy professionals because they can do what they love full time - and professionals often envy hobbyists because they can do whatever the fuck they want without having to think about getting paid for the next song / gig" (which is, coincidentally, the exact thing why I never pursued a career in music / audio, aside the fact that I'm a talentless hack)

2) A veteran recording engineer (Fletcher? Albini?) said in an interview that what ultimately separates a "professional" from a hobbyist is that a professional delivers consistent results above a certain expected level all / most of the time - pay him for a gig and you know the end result may or may not be stellar, but there's an implicit guarantee it will not completely suck either.

I suppose those ideas apply to to professional / factory built vs. DIY stuff as well... If you're manufacturing synths for living (or at very least as a "jobby") you have to hold up a certain standard and actually produce something in numbers economically (relatively speaking) to get paid. Or if you're doing it for yourself for fun, you can either slap something half-working batshit crazy quickly on a stripboard, put it behind a cardboard panel labeled with a sharpie and call it a day, spend years and thousands working on a single Synth Of Your Dreams -tm-, or whatever the hell you feel like doing.

Edit: I guess this is one of those "to the obviousmobile!"-type things to many, but something I hadn't really thought about very much at all back then...


Well, I occasionally design for a professional outfit (Intellijel), but that's become quite a bit harder lately because the eurorack world has moved beyond analog which is what I really like to design. In terms of my own building, it was always an effort to build something quickly that worked well, but make it look halfway decent. I never really cared whether it looked professional or not, and I never had the patience to really devote myself to the graphical arts or to acquiring subsidiary skills such as silkscreening to get really professional looking results. I'm also one cheap bugger, so I would never dream of paying for a professionally made panel. Basically, I acquired some FPD files from DJ Thomas White back in the day, and I've just pretty much used his fonts and stuff for all my panels since. If I spend more than half an hour working on a panel design, I get a bit angry. It also turns out that I really just love building this crap, but I don't really use it all that much. Hence, I've got loads of modules that I've built which have never even been mounted into a case. They've maybe been tested and played with for a few days, and then are simply consigned to the pile of modules I've built but have little use for. Is that nuts or what?
elmegil
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
It also turns out that I really just love building this crap, but I don't really use it all that much. Hence, I've got loads of modules that I've built which have never even been mounted into a case. They've maybe been tested and played with for a few days, and then are simply consigned to the pile of modules I've built but have little use for. Is that nuts or what?


La la la I can't HEEEEAR you :-D
Rex Coil 7
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
They've maybe been tested and played with for a few days, and then are simply consigned to the pile of modules I've built but have little use for. Is that nuts or what?
Same here. Dozens of stomp boxes I've tediously designed and built, stacked in a pile underneath my synth. Probably a few thousand dollars worth had I sold them.

hmmm..... seriously, i just don't get it
sduck
Guilty as charged - you should see my closet.
Revok
Finally got this thing together. I still need to order the LED's but it's working despite some setbacks from parts issues! I'll upload a video once I get the LED's in.



GrantB
I've always thought those enclosures were the coolest. How is it marked?
av500
I built this tiny double pole double throw switch to manually route signals around, by pure chance I "released" it at certain date wink

https://www.instagram.com/p/BhCU9fblhuN/?taken-by=av500

Eric the Red
av500 -that is excessive, ridiculous, stupid, brilliant, gaudy, beautiful, a funny joke, and spectacular.

It would be amazing to see an entire row off these in a giant Eurorack case.. maybe 12 of them lined up in a 30U case... with a large Tesla Coil on each side.

If released, and th price is right... count this wiggler in smile
Rex Coil 7
Eric the Red wrote:
av500 -that is excessive, ridiculous, stupid, brilliant, gaudy, beautiful, a funny joke, and spectacular.
I actually bought into it for about ten seconds (the video on instagram).

lol
av500
Eric the Red wrote:
av500 -that is excessive, ridiculous, stupid, brilliant, gaudy, beautiful, a funny joke, and spectacular.

It would be amazing to see an entire row off these in a giant Eurorack case.. maybe 12 of them lined up in a 30U case... with a large Tesla Coil on each side.

If released, and th price is right... count this wiggler in smile


I'll decide after Superbooth how many hundreds to make wink
pinoaffe
I'm in the process of re-doing my synth project, I designed and lasercut a case out of 5mm plywood and made a *very* minimal set-up module-wise.
Currently working on a circuit to have the 4wire touchscreen output gate, trigger and both X and Y dimensions.
There's a couple of free electric organs i could pick up nearby, so I might grab one, scrap it for the key matrix and whatever else I can make use of.
Does anyone have experience with scrapping e-organs?
Furthermore, I'm using reichelt's BGT 384-2 for both mounting the modules and the power distribution: does anyone know a place that sells them for less than 1.85 euro a pop?


Rex Coil 7
pinoaffe wrote:
.....I'm using reichelt's BGT 384-2 for both mounting the modules and the power distribution: does anyone know a place that sells them for less than 1.85 euro a pop?

Now that's a novel approach. Can't say I have ever seen anyone using M2.5mm threaded rails as bus bars before.

Y'know, I'm known for ranting on and on (and on .... and ... um .. on) about bus bars, and how they "should be" this or that. But, any type of minimal bus bar system has got to be better than most of the power distribution systems out there. Just doing away with the ribbon cable module power cables (and the ribbon cable "soft bus" systems) and using even a rudimentary bus bar system with eyelet style module power cables is a hills and valleys improved method of going about it.

Nicely done! Very clever use of threaded rails as well. I'd bet your ingenuity becomes copied by other builders before long.

thumbs up
Revok
GrantB wrote:
I've always thought those enclosures were the coolest. How is it marked?


I made a paint mask with a vinyl cutting machine I got and them sprayed it with Krylon SUPERMAXX®. The paint is rugged as hell but a bit too runny and I'm not so good with a spray can. I'm looking into thicker paint that I can brush or roll on for the next project.

If I was better at spraying and more patient I'm sure that the Krylon could be lightly dusted to achieve much better results.
av500
pinoaffe wrote:
Furthermore, I'm using reichelt's BGT 384-2 for both mounting the modules and the power distribution: does anyone know a place that sells them for less than 1.85 euro a pop?


I always buy the Reichelt ones since I find them quite cheap and easy to get - how many rack do you plan to build?
pinoaffe
av500 wrote:

I always buy the Reichelt ones since I find them quite cheap and easy to get - how many rack do you plan to build?

It depends on my monetary means and the time I can spend on it, but I plan on making roundabout 2 to 5 cases.
A case currently costs me an estimated 23-30 euros in materials + lasercutter time, 10-17 of those are for the strips, and any place i can shave a lil bit off would be greatly appreciated.
mrand
Hi people,

I'd like to show and tell my project which I'm calling the Sir Klonalong. It's a bread and butter analog system optimized, in a way, for use with the cirklon, since it features a breakout panel for the cirklon analog i/o bus, and also it racks up nicely with the sequencer.

Panels are 10cm x 10 cm PCBs (guess why!), which is turning out to be such a fantastic format that I wish I had been doing this size from day one. It's more rigid than 3u, and allows for horizontally oriented rows of knobs which I find easier to get at.

Modules are installed in groups or four per rack. Rack boxes are simple wooden constructions with a 3pin gx16 aviation jack on the backside for 15v power from a similarly cased PSU.

If anyone wants to build one, or wants more info, please be in touch! This project is in development but progressing more quickly now that I've finally started nailing down the design parameters.

mrand
Here are a couple more pictures to show the construction/panels more clearly:

SoundPool
nice- the size/look kinda reminds me of Paia 4700 stuff
Rex Coil 7
mrand wrote:
Here are a couple more pictures to show the construction/panels more clearly:

XLR Power input?
mrand
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
XLR Power input?

3pin gx16 aviation connector
Rex Coil 7
mrand wrote:
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
XLR Power input?

3pin gx16 aviation connector
Ah! Of course. Very well! thumbs up
Luka
Revok wrote:
Finally got this thing together. I still need to order the LED's but it's working despite some setbacks from parts issues! I'll upload a video once I get the LED's in.





wow that looks ace, good job
motormenace
I milled some blank panels, does that count? Also have a JOVE filter and AI filters to build...

mrand
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
Ah! Of course. Very well! thumbs up


I've been really torn about how to distribute power. I considered for a while to distribute something like 17v via the gx16 cable, then regulate down to 15v in each rackbox with small lm7815/7915 boards (there are readymades from ebay that would be an easy option). Any reason to do that though? Eventually I should take some measurements and what I'm loosing across each gx16 cable.

Best would probably be to deliver AC to each rack, but it seemed like too much work to do the regulation for that in every single rackbox.
Rex Coil 7
mrand wrote:
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
Ah! Of course. Very well! thumbs up


.......Eventually I should take some measurements and what I'm loosing across each gx16 cable....
Yes, this should be step 1 prior to making any decisions regarding what to do next. Best done while under load.
sines


Filling in parts as I get them.

207, 208, 212, 246, 256, 258, 266, 270, 280, 295, 296 all at once. oof.
soup
frac stroh bit station...



Hallmar
soup wrote:
frac stroh bit station...





I literally said 'ouffffff' outloud as a reflex.
Looks really good.
flts
That Bitstation makes me feel like 5 years ago when I was hoping someone would sell me a 3U frame full of blue Wiard 1200 modules to accompany the Wiard 300 I bought (and I kinda still do, I just know the prices would be ridiculous).

Good job!
Oldstench
I sat on this board for 7 years. Finally got around to building a Hackme Rockit.
Rex Coil 7
Oldstench wrote:
I sat on this board for 7 years.....
And after all that time, it never hatched?

lol Damn I'm funny ... soooooo funny.
autodafe
Finished this TH-102 "El Cerrito" VCO, I was missing the panel so I printed one on 2mm acrylic. Infill could be better and needs a fix, as well as some shiny new knobs (waiting for delivery)

In case anyone is inerested I posted another thread with the SVG files used for printing the panel

AlanP


Working mostly off SynthR's schematic, swapped the shift input circuitry for Fonik's Baby Ten bitlet.
mome rath
soup wrote:
frac stroh bit station...




love love
Peake
Buchla 175 modified to customer specs: independent LM386 headphone driver daughter PCB with level control; individual switching on and off of each L and R signal path (doesn't interrupt headphones), to both phono and regular jacks. Painted red and called Magic Bus en homage to the Kesey traveling rig! Chip Flynn of Apetechnology did the silkscreening and some editing of the artwork! Thanks Chip!

pre55ure
Peake wrote:
Painted red and called Magic Bus en homage to the Kesey traveling rig!




Nice.

What happens when you lick it?

eek! eek! eek! Dead Banana Om
Rex Coil 7
pre55ure wrote:
Peake wrote:
Painted red and called Magic Bus en homage to the Kesey traveling rig!




Nice.

What happens when you lick it?

eek! eek! eek! Dead Banana Om
People stare at the weirdo licking his synth module, that's what.

lol
Peake
applause

I could rub some Doritos upon it before I ship, to keep with the legend...a little..."Guys, I swear, there's a taste!"
Rex Coil 7
Peake wrote:
applause

I could rub some Doritos upon it before I ship, to keep with the legend...a little..."Guys, I swear, there's a taste!"
For the people that licked cold poles during winter and got their tongue stuck to it when they were kids .....

... some people's children!

There are those that will lick anything.

Anything.

At all.

lol
J3RK
soup wrote:
frac stroh bit station...





Nice! I love that panel! thumbs up
J3RK
Peake wrote:
Buchla 175 modified to customer specs: independent LM386 headphone driver daughter PCB with level control; individual switching on and off of each L and R signal path (doesn't interrupt headphones), to both phono and regular jacks. Painted red and called Magic Bus en homage to the Kesey traveling rig! Chip Flynn of Apetechnology did the silkscreening and some editing of the artwork! Thanks Chip!



I'd love to see a full 100 system in red. nodnod
Rex Coil 7
J3RK wrote:
....I'd love to see a full 100 system in red. nodnod
I came ~that close~ to going there when I started designing the multi-circuit panels for the Dot Com based project synth. Chickened out though!
J3RK
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
J3RK wrote:
....I'd love to see a full 100 system in red. nodnod
I came ~that close~ to going there when I started designing the multi-circuit panels for the Dot Com based project synth. Chickened out though!


hihi I've done one red panel. The anodizing was more on the burgundy side though. It turned out nice, but definitely not what I was expecting.
batchas
J3RK wrote:
....I'd love to see a full 100 system in red.

Unique Guinness ftw!

BTW, pers. I'd go white on red, rather than black on red if the printing method allows it.

Sorry the photo (from a private project / 1 module only was made) is not really sharp by downsizing it while posting. Here a better quality.

flts
batchas wrote:
Sorry the photo (from a private project / 1 module only was made) is not really sharp by downsizing it while posting.


love

I've been more into black / natural anodized / blue panels so far but that is simply beautiful.
corpusjonsey




Rex Coil 7
Are you fekking kidding me?

GORGEOUS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  !


Very original, loads of design time and mental effort .... not to mention just plain old raw talent.

we're not worthy

corpusjonsey wrote:




ashleym
corpusjonsey wrote:
[img]https://www.muffwiggler.com


Where has that come from????

What is it???

Triple well done for this amazing thing. Brilliant. Inspirational even without know what it is!!!
corpusjonsey
Thanks for the kind thoughts!

This is a Rollz-5: https://modularaddict.com/manufacturer/meng-qi/mengqi-rollz5-pcb
OB1


Did a System X VCF to go with my VCOs - gonna do the envelope next. Such nice boards to work with and great sounding modules.











OB1
(there are some resistors missing in some of the pics as I had to wait for more to be delivered - it's all finished now)
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
(This is already shown in another thread, but I'll show it here too)...

I made a 4HP eurorack version of my ASR module for a wiggler in Oz. Here it is:




I know the panel ain't perfect, but for something completely fabricated in my garage, I think it turned out pretty well.
jules
Doc, I'm impressed by your metal/alu work.
The cutting I can figure out, but that bend...
Did you use a press, or just tightening up in an vice and folded it?

And actually, what's the module function?
Rex Coil 7
jules wrote:
Doc, I'm impressed ... what's the module function?


Here ya go ....

Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
That video is just a stub, but here's a more educational video made with my 5U ASR (which is identical in every way except size).

Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
jules wrote:
Doc, I'm impressed by your metal/alu work.
The cutting I can figure out, but that bend...
Did you use a press, or just tightening up in an vice and folded it?

And actually, what's the module function?


Hey jules, (don't make it bad)... sorry.

So, concerning the aluminum work, it was cut on an industrial guillotine, bent on a hydraulic bending press, and the notches were cut out on an industrial band saw (in the order), all by a technician (Dave T) in the machine shop at my department at the university. I drilled the holes at home on my drill press.

I could have done the whole thing at home, as I have a 14" band saw which I could have used to cut out the piece and the notches, and it could have been bent on my next-door-neighbor's vice with a hammer.

One thing to note: this is 5052 alloy aluminum, which can be bent like this. The more common 6061 aluminum doesn't take a bend as well and may crack along the outer radius of the bend.

My plan is to lay out this circuit for SMD and make a proper eurorack module out of it. I would still make it all in my laundry room and garage, but it would be skiff friendly. The only thing is that I hate doing SMD by hand, so I'd probably end up having the same place make it that makes Intellijel stuff.
Rex Coil 7
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
..... I made a 4HP eurorack version of my ASR module .... completely fabricated in my garage ....
... and that ain't no kit!

Dr. Sketch-n-Etch .... strides tall among the KINGS of true DIY within our membership.









FACT.



we're not worthy
jules
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:

One thing to note: this is 5052 alloy aluminum, which can be bent like this. The more common 6061 aluminum doesn't take a bend as well and may crack along the outer radius of the bend.



I'll take a sad song and make it better..

This explain a lot: my sorry experience with the 3mm aluminium sheets -however you want to pronounce it- you can buy in your average DIY shop, is that they end up crumbling and snapping like short crust pastry if one tries to bend/fold it at anything more than a 22° angle.
Need to check on the "alloy"/"number" first. Noted.

And thanks for the refs to the CGS.
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
jules wrote:
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:

One thing to note: this is 5052 alloy aluminum, which can be bent like this. The more common 6061 aluminum doesn't take a bend as well and may crack along the outer radius of the bend.



I'll take a sad song and make it better..

This explain a lot: my sorry experience with the 3mm aluminium sheets -however you want to pronounce it- you can buy in your average DIY shop, is that they end up crumbling and snapping like short crust pastry if one tries to bend/fold it at anything more than a 22° angle.
Need to check on the "alloy"/"number" first. Noted.

And thanks for the refs to the CGS.


It was the tech in my department machine shop, Dave T, who turned me onto the different aluminum alloys. He said "I guess you'll be wanting to make that out of the bendable aluminum" and then went on to inform me of the numbers. Definitely worth remembering!
flts


Oops, that went a bit wrong way despite the preview, damn you Exif orientation.

In any case, that's the '50s scifi noise machine:

- A Benjolin (from elmegil's MW standalone PCB),
- Spring Mk2 (Music Thing),
- Blinkenlights for the Benjo shift register's Q outputs (stripboard) and
- 3->2 "matrix" mixer with around 5x gain (stripboard).

Still debating whether to fill the upper side with a smaller panel containing some small utility stuff (Looping AD env? White noise? Maybe Rob's Zeitgeist "delay" would fit?) or to keep the springs accessible so one can mess with them.
Rex Coil 7
flts wrote:


...that's the '50s scifi noise machine:.


If I may offer a few suggestions on using metal stamps?

Place an anvil under the control panel to support it when you use metal stamps. The backing support will prevent the aluminum from caving in and making the lettering look "dented". When I said "anvil", I meant a solid metal "lunk" that will keep the aluminum from denting when the letters are stamped.

I made my own anvils for hand stamping stomp boxes.



Clamping a piece of angle iron to hold the panel down prevents the panel from "bouncing" when you hit it with the hammer. It may also be used as a straight edge to help keep the letters aligned.



When you hit the stamp with the hammer, DO NOT HIT IT TWICE! Hit it once, then lift the stamp off of the panel to check the letter. Then place the stamp back in to the letter and hit it again if need be. If you hit it twice without lifting the stamp off of the panel, you risk doing a "double strike" which will make a double letter and look bad.





After you're done lettering, you may paint the panel. Then sand the excess paint from the panel which will leave only the lettering filled with paint to produce a nice "infilled" look. It looks like this when you're done .....





I welded up my own anvils out of "AR Plate" (armor plate) for durability, otherwise after a few hundred letters the anvil will begin to indent and defeat the entire purpose of having a backing anvil. But regular steel works fine for home/hobby DIY use. You can even use stacked up scraps of thick steel. The point is to provide a very solid backing so the aluminum module or panel won't cave in when you put the hammer to it!

I probably did 8,000+ characters this way when I used to build stompboxes for sale (I built roughly 500 of them). The "crooked D" was done on purpose, if you notice every place there is a "D" it's a little bit low, and a little crooked. That "crooked D" became part of my brand and logo. I stopped building them a few years ago.



I've never revealed my "secret methods" before this post!
eek!
flts
Thanks a lot for the process tips / secret sauce regarding the letter punches! The results look beautiful.

I also feel the need to emphasize that regarding the build I posted, critique from several schools of craftsmen is perfectly valid here, so to serve as a warning to others:

- The stripboards and wiring (not pictured above) look awful awful, very very simple stuff but I did not plan the layouts in advance and that shows (and don't even get me started about the electrical side of things...)

- The labeling is done in the quickest and dirtiest way possible as noted - as is obvious from the end result, I did not use a proper solid non-flexing base nor any guides, and applied way too much force and way too many hits, so the panel is uneven and the letters "wonky" as a result

- The wood is leftover stuff, very quickly and badly sanded and full of blemishes, both even more obvious now that the frame has been stained and oiled

- The joints are terrible - at least they do have dowels to hold the thing together but I didn't bother squaring and planing the ends properly and had to use quite a bit of wood putty to make it even half decent

- I did not bother to sand an even "brushed" surface to the leftover aluminum and as a result, you can see pretty different texture on the places where the hammer hits have produced unintended dents (nor did I consider applying any protective lacquer / wax on top)

The somewhat, ehm, negligent process is a direct result from the fact that this is actually the first synth DIY project I've had the chance to start in the past 1,5 years or so (most free time having spent taking care of other things, and whatever DIY time there was, on the full synth panel exhibited a couple of pages before), so I just wanted to have some personal reassurance that I'm still able to finish things before "life gets in the way" so to say.

Maybe the next one will actually be done more by the book. The quality of woodwork is sub-par by my own standards, but regarding the punches/stamps, the tips are much appreciated as I pretty much have an idea of what I'm doing wrong, but haven't actually taken the time to learn to do it right yet either.
Rex Coil 7
flts wrote:
Thanks a lot for the process tips / secret sauce regarding the letter punches! The results look beautiful.

Maybe the next one will actually be done more by the book. The quality of woodwork is sub-par by my own standards, but regarding the punches/stamps, the tips are much appreciated as I pretty much have an idea of what I'm doing wrong, but haven't actually taken the time to learn to do it right yet either.

I also feel the need to emphasize that regarding the build I posted, critique from several schools of craftsmen is perfectly valid here....
No worries! Thank you for the compliments on my workmanship ....

hihi

I've made a number of things myself that I didn't do up to par ... I wasn't trying to do it all super nice, I was just trying to get the idea put into a tangible working model to test the concept. The methods I presented for metal stamping are for anyone, really. Just passing along something I taught myself to do well so that others would be able to put the techniques to good use (for you too!).

So don't worry, we're all just people here trying to build what we see in our dreams. Sometimes things don't look so great, but they work properly .... which is priority number one!

thumbs up

flts
Guinness ftw!

We have a saying in Finnish that freely translates to something like "when you do it yourself, you get whatever happens to be the result" (or maybe, "you get whatever it ends up being", hard to say). I suppose that's as good motto for me as any.
batchas
I needed a volume control at the output of my Ciat-Lonbarde Sidrax Organ.
The way the Sidrax is done there’s no way to add it inside it, so I thought I’ll do it quickly externally, as long as it remains small smile
All recycled.
J3RK
batchas wrote:
I needed a volume control at the output of my Ciat-Lonbarde Sidrax Organ.
The way the Sidrax is done there’s no way to add it inside it, so I thought I’ll do it quickly externally, as long as it remains small smile
All recycled.


Nice! Now you need a big red Mungo Sync button next to it, and you're all set!
J3RK
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
flts wrote:


...that's the '50s scifi noise machine:.


If I may offer a few suggestions on using metal stamps?

Place an anvil under the control panel to support it when you use metal stamps. The backing support will prevent the aluminum from caving in and making the lettering look "dented". When I said "anvil", I meant a solid metal "lunk" that will keep the aluminum from denting when the letters are stamped.

I made my own anvils for hand stamping stomp boxes.



Clamping a piece of angle iron to hold the panel down prevents the panel from "bouncing" when you hit it with the hammer. It may also be used as a straight edge to help keep the letters aligned.



When you hit the stamp with the hammer, DO NOT HIT IT TWICE! Hit it once, then lift the stamp off of the panel to check the letter. Then place the stamp back in to the letter and hit it again if need be. If you hit it twice without lifting the stamp off of the panel, you risk doing a "double strike" which will make a double letter and look bad.





After you're done lettering, you may paint the panel. Then sand the excess paint from the panel which will leave only the lettering filled with paint to produce a nice "infilled" look. It looks like this when you're done .....





I welded up my own anvils out of "AR Plate" (armor plate) for durability, otherwise after a few hundred letters the anvil will begin to indent and defeat the entire purpose of having a backing anvil. But regular steel works fine for home/hobby DIY use. You can even use stacked up scraps of thick steel. The point is to provide a very solid backing so the aluminum module or panel won't cave in when you put the hammer to it!

I probably did 8,000+ characters this way when I used to build stompboxes for sale (I built roughly 500 of them). The "crooked D" was done on purpose, if you notice every place there is a "D" it's a little bit low, and a little crooked. That "crooked D" became part of my brand and logo. I stopped building them a few years ago.



I've never revealed my "secret methods" before this post!
eek!


Those look amazing!
J3RK
flts wrote:


Oops, that went a bit wrong way despite the preview, damn you Exif orientation.

In any case, that's the '50s scifi noise machine:

- A Benjolin (from elmegil's MW standalone PCB),
- Spring Mk2 (Music Thing),
- Blinkenlights for the Benjo shift register's Q outputs (stripboard) and
- 3->2 "matrix" mixer with around 5x gain (stripboard).

Still debating whether to fill the upper side with a smaller panel containing some small utility stuff (Looping AD env? White noise? Maybe Rob's Zeitgeist "delay" would fit?) or to keep the springs accessible so one can mess with them.


Fun! Maybe some "Newton's Cradle" swinging balls that you can use to pluck the springs? Not sure why that came to mind, but could be fun to have something that hits it and decays in speed.
flts
J3RK wrote:
Fun! Maybe some "Newton's Cradle" swinging balls that you can use to pluck the springs? Not sure why that came to mind, but could be fun to have something that hits it and decays in speed.


Hmm... some kind of mechanical contraption could be cool! Especially considering we have a cat in the house who could be persuaded to "operate" it...
Rex Coil 7
J3RK wrote:
Rex Coil 7 wrote:




That "crooked D" became part of my brand and logo. I stopped building them a few years ago.



I've never revealed my "secret methods" before this post!
eek!


Those look amazing!
Thanks man! I've gone back and forth thinking about making synth modules using the same look/feel and construction methods and lettering techniques. It's VERY time consuming, but the look is really unique with lots of "flavor". It wouldn't take too awful much to modify the tooling I've already made to work with synth panels. And using the stainless hardware with a splash of color would look pretty cool (at least I think so). Of course I would need to use someone else's circuits, I'm not educated enough to design unique circuits, at least not at this time. Meh ..... maybe someday.

thumbs up
OB1
Yeah, those look seriously cool Rex! Proper craftsmanship :-)
batchas
OB1 wrote:
Yeah, those look seriously cool Rex! Proper craftsmanship :-)

+1
Really impressive we're not worthy
Jay F.
Not as cool as some previous posts, but I made these recently :





squarewavesurfer
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
flts wrote:


...that's the '50s scifi noise machine:.


If I may offer a few suggestions on using metal stamps?

Place an anvil under the control panel to support it when you use metal stamps. The backing support will prevent the aluminum from caving in and making the lettering look "dented". When I said "anvil", I meant a solid metal "lunk" that will keep the aluminum from denting when the letters are stamped.

I made my own anvils for hand stamping stomp boxes.



Clamping a piece of angle iron to hold the panel down prevents the panel from "bouncing" when you hit it with the hammer. It may also be used as a straight edge to help keep the letters aligned.



When you hit the stamp with the hammer, DO NOT HIT IT TWICE! Hit it once, then lift the stamp off of the panel to check the letter. Then place the stamp back in to the letter and hit it again if need be. If you hit it twice without lifting the stamp off of the panel, you risk doing a "double strike" which will make a double letter and look bad.





After you're done lettering, you may paint the panel. Then sand the excess paint from the panel which will leave only the lettering filled with paint to produce a nice "infilled" look. It looks like this when you're done .....





I welded up my own anvils out of "AR Plate" (armor plate) for durability, otherwise after a few hundred letters the anvil will begin to indent and defeat the entire purpose of having a backing anvil. But regular steel works fine for home/hobby DIY use. You can even use stacked up scraps of thick steel. The point is to provide a very solid backing so the aluminum module or panel won't cave in when you put the hammer to it!

I probably did 8,000+ characters this way when I used to build stompboxes for sale (I built roughly 500 of them). The "crooked D" was done on purpose, if you notice every place there is a "D" it's a little bit low, and a little crooked. That "crooked D" became part of my brand and logo. I stopped building them a few years ago.



I've never revealed my "secret methods" before this post!
eek!


Wow, this is some amazing work. Now I want to scrap all my eurorack panels and get into stamping!
Rex Coil 7
batchas wrote:
OB1 wrote:
Yeah, those look seriously cool Rex! Proper craftsmanship :-)

+1
Really impressive we're not worthy
Thanks gents. Here's just a few more images of some others ....



This one is powder coated in a custom color I formulated myself, I called it "Mil Spec" (as in "military specification"). I still have about a pound of that powder left over.
















This model was named after my Dad ... he was "frugal" and didn't like a lot of frills. So seeing how this compressor module only has one knob, and it was inexpensive, it was fitting to name it after him.








Another custom powder coat color I made up that I called "Hot Rod Black".





hihi
Jay F.
eek!

This is serious cabling skills !!!
Great job !

And I like your taste in colors. love
OB1
Oh that “mil spec” one is stunning!
dot matrix madness
Jay F. wrote:
Not as cool as some previous posts, but I made these recently :

Great job on boards and panels! That's true DIY.
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
FARNDURK we're not worthy we're not worthy we're not worthy we're not worthy we're not worthy
Moog$FooL$
WOW!! we're not worthy we're not worthy we're not worthy

i agree with the others here..... funny, me & the Doc were just talking about your builds yesterday. eek!

i know nothing about POWDER COATING, & in fact i didn't even realize u can do it on your own!!!

is it easy?? how much effort & tools does it require?? woah
FetidEye
New NoiseCreep design, with mini banana internal patchbay, and normal size bare banana" touch connectors
Whohoo! colors!
Jarno
How colourful smile
So the knobs are lasercut, and pressfit onto splined pot shafts? What material did you use?
GrantB
FetidEye that is so cool. LMK if you need more mini banana jacks. I accidentally ordered a bunch one time d'oh!
FetidEye
Jarno wrote:
How colourful smile
So the knobs are lasercut, and pressfit onto splined pot shafts? What material did you use?


you guessed right! material: 9mm birk wood (berken)
That is soft enough to press onto the pots. It does not work so great with 9mm multiplex. (I tried that)

GrantB wrote:
FetidEye that is so cool. LMK if you need more mini banana jacks. I accidentally ordered a bunch one time d'oh!


Sure! I accidentally ordered mine too, but I thought, why not use them smile
PM me
bonzai
FedidEye: funky! smile

About those stomp boxes: wow, that's some seriously cool stuff! Really like those blue caps and the overall design, simple, almost spartan but just wow!
we're not worthy


About my own humble DIY skills: just finished another Yusynth build: the Steiner/Synthacon VCF, as usual all handmade with copper plated PCB as front panel. smile





Took me a while to tweak the resonance circuitry down to a controllable level, but still it's screaming like a stabbed pig as we say here. twisted

I'm currently thinking of putting all my copper plated stuff (mostly Yusynth) in its own case, as I now had to start filling up my spare 1x84 case... oh, boy... hihi

PS: the Dr recently stated to like building stuff more than actually using it - guess what, guilty as charged! If I only knew how to use all that stuff properly... lol but as a noob I'm actually still learning... (does this count as an excuse?)
Rex Coil 7
Moog$FooL$ wrote:
WOW!! we're not worthy we're not worthy we're not worthy

i agree with the others here..... funny, me & the Doc were just talking about your builds yesterday. eek!

i know nothing about POWDER COATING, & in fact i didn't even realize u can do it on your own!!!

is it easy?? how much effort & tools does it require?? woah
Man oh man ... TONS of thanks for all of the compliments and praise to everyone that chimed in. I worked my ASS off (I literally have no more ass, it's all worked off!) to build those things (500+) and I am very proud of my work. So I'm very humbled and grateful for all of the uplifting comments to everyone that offered them. Seriously! Thank you!

I did not do the powder coating myself. I only made the powder by mixing various colors/shades of powder together in carefully measured ratios (1 part yellow, 6 parts forest green, 2 parts flat grey, to make one color .. etc .. by the way that ratio is nothing, I just made it up as an example). After I made up the powders I had them actually done at a local fabricator's shop that does commercial powder coating for a living, their oven is large enough to fit an entire car inside (they build dune buggys and make off road racing vehicles, they typically powder coat the entire frame of a race vehicle so they would just add my jobs to their big jobs in the same oven). Usually, I brought them batches of ten or twelve panels at a time. Because of that, some orders took weeks to ship to my customers (sometimes months) since I had to get a bunch of panels lettered and drilled first, then I had to wait until the powder shop had enough stuff to fill their oven before they would do a "firing". It made some folks become impatient with me .... but hey, it was 100% custom stuff that was hand built to their specs, often times with custom lettering (their kid's names on them, custom names of certain builds, and so on). I had no "off the shelf" pedals.

It requires a special ~gun~ designed especially for powder coating, as well as an oven to cook/heat the powder until it melts to the surface. After a few test shots were done on some small scrap pieces of aluminum and I was happy with the outcome, I sent the powder coating manufacturer the color formula I made up (the written formula, and the actual finished sample) and they then used it to make up a small batch of powder and made a few test shots, which they shipped to me for approval. Once I approved the color, they made up a full batch and shipped it to me which I've kept in careful storage. There was a minimum amount I had to buy of both of the colors I used (the military green and the flat black) which was ten pounds of each color. The powder that I mixed up used very high quality powders which are UV resistant. If powder isn't UV resistant it tends to "chalk" after a few years on the item that's been coated. The "chalking" looks just like that ... chalk ... it's white and powdery. It will form on the part and is pretty much impossible to completely remove to restore the finish. So it's best to start with UV resistant powders right off the get go.

However, you don't have to go to these lengths. I wanted my products to be totally unique, and to last a very long time. I wanted my stompboxes to look like nothing else on the market (hence the military-like colors, the "Cold War Era" look of design, the upside down enclosures with the cover on the top instead of on the bottom so the screws would show just like a synth module, stainless steel hardware and flat washers, LED holders that are unavailable anywhere, over sized switches, custom machined markings on each knob that I did myself, as well as the metal stamped lettering ... and a few other things like neat wiring and so on). Anyhow, you may just buy off the shelf powders, most powder makers have TONS of different choices of all different types of powders. There are hobbyist kits that have the guns and the other stuff needed to do small runs or one-off jobs. You Tube has a lot of how-to videos.

You'll also need an oven that you're willing to sacrifice to do powder coating and/or other heat treating processes. If the parts are small (such as a synth panel) a toaster oven will work fine. The process is messy, powder gets all over the place (moreso than using a router on wood) and it is very difficult to clean up the powder that have got on the floor or benchtops. Again, think wheat flour or that shmoots from a chemical/powder fire extinguisher. I'd also suggest devoting a pair of shoes that you'll never walk into the house with, and are left in the powder booth in your shop. Same with any cover-up clothing. You'll need a mask as well, you really don't want to inhale finely powdered plastic, your body can't assimilate it and it builds up in your lungs.

Powder coating is very fine powdered plastic, fine as wheat flour. It is applied with a positively charged ~gun~, and the part is negatively charged. The opposite polarities help to make the super fine powdered plastic adhere to very small surface details such as hand stamped lettering, sharp corners, deep cornered pockets, and so on. The charged powder is also attracted to the part so as to reduce over spray and waste.

Once the part is coated with the powdered plastic (hence "powder coating"), it is very carefully placed in to an oven and heated at roughly 350f to 400f for about 45 minutes. This makes the powdered plastic "melt" on to the surface and adhere rather permanently. It also forms a very durable finish that is FAR tougher than any paint of any kind. It is essentially totally impervious to any petroleum or organic solvents. Gasoline, alcohol, diesel fuel, or carburetor cleaner won't even touch it.

To remove powder coating, the coating must be scorched with a propane torch (not Oxy/Acet ... that is FAR too hot) and then bead blasted clean. If the powder is over-scorched by the torch, it turns into a bubbling mess that is FAR harder than the original powder coating, and requires mechanical stripping (as in it must be GROUND off with a grinder, sand paper won't even touch it). It looks horrible, all bubbled up and very uneven and brown. So it is actually more difficult and requires more skill and experience to remove it than it does to apply it.

Non-custom powder usually costs about $15 to $20 per pound. If you plan on using powder coating on a commercial product, you should plan on buying your own "stock" of powder to insure that multiple runs of (let's say) modules all come out the same color. Powder color can vary from batch to batch. So if you are wanting to use it to make batches of synth panels, buy a pound or five to maintain consistency. When you take the panels to your local powdercoating shop, bring some of your own powder with the parts. Not all of it, just a small amount (about enough to fill a 4 oz cup or so). You don't want to have your entire cache of powder become contaminated at the powder coater's shop if they happen to put the gun in the entire bucket and the gun "blows back" a little powder from the previous job. So take just a small amount and carefully store the remainder in a clean, dark, DRY, place. "DRY" is very VERY important, if the powder comes in contact with humidity or moisture for a little while, it will "clog up" the gun or make an blemished final product.

There's what I have.
Jarno
Must say Rex, those stompboxes look totally radical, very nice job!
Having built stompboxes myself, I hated the wiring and the fumbling to get it all in the box. I can imagine that mounting the controls on the lid rather than the other way around (as is mostly done) makes it easier to do a neat wiring job (and the screws add to the charm smile ).
Rex Coil 7
Jarno wrote:
Must say Rex, those stompboxes look totally radical, very nice job!
Having built stompboxes myself, I hated the wiring and the fumbling to get it all in the box. I can imagine that mounting the controls on the lid rather than the other way around (as is mostly done) makes it easier to do a neat wiring job (and the screws add to the charm smile ).
Thank you, I really appreciate the props! Yes, building them ~upside down~ makes things far simpler to do .... pretty much no different than building a synth module. I took advantage of the visible panel screws a few times, using anodized screws to accent color ....



I caught some grief from some folks about the upside down construction a few times. I guess everyone has their druthers.

seriously, i just don't get it
GrantB
something wonderful those pedals are too nice to step on!
Reality Checkpoint
I would love some Farndurk pedals. I consider them to be works of art. Beautiful, just beautiful.

we're not worthy
Rex Coil 7
GrantB wrote:
something wonderful those pedals are too nice to step on!


Reality Checkpoint wrote:
I would love some Farndurk pedals. I consider them to be works of art. Beautiful, just beautiful.

we're not worthy
Oh boy ...first of all, thank you for the really wonderful and supportive things you guys have said. I actually have several thousand pictures of dozens more designs and pedal types. I haven't even shown my "Tone Plug" equipped units yet which were quite popular. Essentially, pedals outfitted with TRS jacks on the front panel that accepted right angle TRS 1/4" plugs filled with different components (caps/diodes etc..) that changed the character, distortion, compression, and sound of an overdrive. You could have five different "overdrives" in your pocket, with just one single-width pedal on your pedalboard. Change plugs, and you had a different pedal. Easy peasy.

I made ~about~ 500 units, all said and done. I photographed every single order just before I boxed it for shipping, which helped to document what I'd built as well as afforded warranty protection (I can tell if someone has been tinkering with them, the insides simply will not match the photos I took of each serial numbered pedal).

I say "oh boy" ... because I have been thinking about doing a few of them to help finance my synth project. But ... man ... those things are a LOT of work. The polished ones aren't covered with any type of clear coating, that's just hard elbow grease applied to a lot of wet sanding. I've tried clear coat, but with the amount of torque I use on the footswitches to tighten them down the clear coat sortof flakes up around the stainless flat washer.

By the way, those large flat washers are totally custom made. I made a few thousand of them myself with handmade punching dies and a five ton press. They're made out of surplus military stainless steel that I bought from a military auction held nearby. When we owned our repair shop we got on the CSA Contractors list, which gave us the privilege of being invited to closed surplus auctions every other year. I purchased several sheets of stainless steel, which I made the large flat washers used on the foot switches. I still have one or two of them on hand......



Using those washers requires the use of special stainless steel lock washers that provide enough "push back" on the nut/flat to assist staying tight. I also use Loctite on every single threaded component (pots, toggles, foot switches, jacks). My pedals were designed with a philosophy I called "Outlife" .. which means I wanted them to be able to outlive their builder (me). I'm only 57 so I have a few years yet. So the "Outlife" design and construction protocol means 20+ years.

I also still have a few dozen circuit boards of a few of the models (overdrive PCBs suited for either guitar or bass as well as some compressor PCBs). There's a few other straggler PCBs as well. All of my circuits have roughly 1 meg-ohm of input impedance so they are excellent "first in line" pedals no matter whether passive or active pickups are used. However, I can pretty much use any circuit board as long as it fits within the form factor I use (the enclosures must fit my anvils). For instance, the "WFO" (which stands for "wide fucking open" ... motorcycle racing jargon which refers to holding the throttle wide open) is a distortion unit which uses a PCB that I bought from a DIY board maker. It's great for that 80s thick midrange rock guitar (like Van Halen).

I also still have a few pounds of the MilSpec military green powder left, which seems to still be dry and good. And I'm sitting fat on electronic components (resistors, caps, LEDs) and LED holders (about 400). Plenty of wire, plenty of solder, and a few enclosures.

So the "oh boy" was kindof a sigh of exasperation .... ~do I get back into this or not?~ ... sort of thing. On one hand, I could sure use the money. On the other hand .... all of that work!

I discussed this with my wife .... a few times actually over the last several years ... she gives me ~the look~ every time it comes up.

(hides)

So anyhow .... we'll see what happens. I've also thought about (MAYBE) doing synth modules with the same set of design elements and protocols. I'd like to consign someone like Dr. Sketch-n-Etch to do the circuit designs if I did it. All of the pedals used original circuits of my own design. But if I did this for synths, it would have to be circuits that are beyond expected and/or over-sold circuits already out there. Do we really need another VCO? Y'know what I mean?

I'll have to think about this. Here's the very last order I filled ... it was for one of our moderators, *sduck:











And once more .... thank you VERY much for the supportive comments and the super nice things everyone has offered.

I didn't mean to run this thread over with a bulldozer.

Best Regards ... Peace On Earth.

neutronarmy
Thank you for documenting some of your process Rex Coil 7. After following stompbox building for quite some time, you seem to have your own unique workflow that produces some really amazing results.

I do have one technical question: I see that you use plastic standoffs. I've always been afraid to use them in a stompbox fearing that the vibration associated with the act of switching would wear away the adhesive over time. Any suggestions/input as longevity seems to have been your goal? Beautiful work!
Moog$FooL$
wowies Mr. RC7..... thanks for that info. about powder coating.
for some reason, i actually thought it could be done simply at home.

LOLlers... i'm so silly!! very frustrating very frustrating very frustrating
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
Moog$FooL$ wrote:
wowies Mr. RC7..... thanks for that info. about powder coating.
for some reason, i actually thought it could be done simply at home.

LOLlers... i'm so silly!! very frustrating very frustrating very frustrating


Yeah, you are pretty fuckin' silly. MY ASS IS BLEEDING
Rex Coil 7
neutronarmy wrote:
Thank you for documenting some of your process Rex Coil 7. After following stompbox building for quite some time, you seem to have your own unique workflow that produces some really amazing results.

I do have one technical question: I see that you use plastic standoffs. I've always been afraid to use them in a stompbox fearing that the vibration associated with the act of switching would wear away the adhesive over time. Any suggestions/input as longevity seems to have been your goal? Beautiful work!
Thank you for your observations and compliments.

If I have one thing I would change on them, it would be using metal standoffs instead of nylon stanchions. I have seen some really old stompboxes that used the nylon stands that held their ground. I figured if old adhesive worked on boxes made in the 1970s, modern adhesives would do.

There are always "I would ruther" things with anything we do. In my project synth, I wish I would have used stainless steel t-nuts rather than the zinc plated steel ones which I used instead.

Not using metal standoffs in my pedals was a choice I made influenced by some forum feedback in 2006. As it was, there were a lot of guitar players that didn't like the fact the I built my pedals "upside down", because they felt the visible screws "fuddup the lines" (the design lines of the box). Using metal standoffs would have put more visible screws on the panels, so I opted to use the extremely popular nylon adhesive backed standoffs.

Additionally, once the adhesive is really ~seated~ and has had time to settle in, removing those standoffs is a task!!! It usually tears apart with some of it attached to the standoff, and some of it attached to the enclosure. But it takes some doing to remove them without destroying the standoff. I have to use a screwdriver, and wriggle it under the nylon base, then pry the standoff from the enclosure. This normally messes up the standoff. That adhesive is pretty tough stuff. At least the standoffs I used had adhesive that was that way, I can't speak for all of them, however. Perhaps buy a small handful of them, test them out so you can make your own informed conclusions. If I recall they don't cost very much.

My oldest ones were made in 2005 (they're my own pedals). The standoffs are still holding up fine, even being 13 years old. Some of which being exposed to ambient temps exceeding 130f degrees (they're stored in my shop, which easily hits temps that high during our summers here). While I cannot speak for all conditions of use, I'm fairly at ease with them in many situations.

I made a choice, I have to live with it.

Sometimes you must face compromises that you don't agree with.

Unfortunately, this is a concept that many people these days don't have any patience for.

seriously, i just don't get it
Rex Coil 7
Moog$FooL$ wrote:
wowies Mr. RC7..... thanks for that info. about powder coating.
for some reason, i actually thought it could be done simply at home.

LOLlers... i'm so silly!! very frustrating very frustrating very frustrating
Well, no ... DIYing powder coating is actually done. I made the choice to have that local shop do them for me for a few reasons.

** I had a several thousand dollar credit owed to me by that shop from some previous dealings, this was a good way to recoup that credit (the shop owner felt the same way).

** The burden of "re-dos" was placed on them, not me. Panels must be bead blasted before being powdercoated if done properly. This is to create "tooth" on the metal surface for the powder to really adhere well. After that, the powder is applied, the panel is baked, and once cooled the job is inspected. If there is a problem, the shop was responsible for redoing the job (bubbled surface, blemishes, rough surface, crap/garbage that wasn't cleaned out of the lettering well enough which contaminated the process and created "foam" inside of the lettering ... and so on). I've already detailed what it takes to remove powdercoating and prepare the part for another try at it ... it's a hassle!

Not only all of that, while a given batch of panels was at the powder shop, that produced time for me to do other things ......

**ordering more parts
**checking in received parts orders
**marketing (always ceaselessly marketing at least one hour every day in the forums, answering questions and promoting new models and options)
**pre-testing each single PCB component and verifying their values (caps, resistors, pots, switches)
**loading the build boards with the pots, resistors, caps, LEDs, etc with the correct values corresponding to build diagrams (resistor "R1" placed on slot "1" of the parts board to correspond with build sheets for a given circuit or pedal and so on)
**wiring/doing the lead dressing on panels that didn't need powdercoating
**doing the paint filled lettering and wet sanding the panels
**populating PCBs for panels that were at the powder shop
**machining the marker dots on all of the knobs
**drilling enclosures/installing jacks and pre-wiring the lower half of the enclosures
**making Tone Plugs
**designing the wiring and other issues for custom builds
**designing new PCBs
**updating my website (which was done 2 or 3 times per week)
**boxing and taking boxes to the shipping company
**testing out completed units (I actually played my guitar with the pedals to prove their operation ... 30 minutes minimum)
**emailing tracking numbers
**corresponding with customers as well as potential customers via emails .... and so on.

I often fell asleep in the shop, woke up and went right back to work.

So having the powder coating done by a local shop was like doubling my labor hours available to make pedals (and everything that went with selling them).

But if someone just wants to powder coat small batches, or onesey twosey small bit work, doing it at home is something that is actually a thing!

My situation was as close to mass producing them as could be with just a one person operation. I was catering to a lot of customers, and I wanted my products to look as sharp as possible. I didn't want to hassle with re-dos or problems if I didn't have to.

One Other Regret:


The polished and semi-polished models have absolutely no clear coating or otherwise protective material on the finished surface. When I spent a few hours sanding/wet sanding the hard crust from the enclosure covers I had removed the layer of protective oxidation. On a few of the polished/semi-polished ones I've seen a spotty/blemished oxidation form on the surface making the pedal look like ASS. These seem to be limited to ones used in humid areas or areas with wet climates. Out here in the southwest (the northern tip of the Sonora Desert) we get less than one inch of rain per year. The finish holds up just fine out here in "the dirt". But in more humid/wet/snowy areas of the world, the polished ones don't hold up as well.

Given the method used to do infilled lettering, coupled with the fact that the high amount of torque on the foot switch nut (which is a much thicker nut than the footswitch is supplied with) cracked any clear coat put on the polished panels, I had to go with no clear coat.

The MilSpec O.D. Green powder coating has turned out to be the most durable ... that stuff is tough as the Hubs Of Hell! Still looks fresh after years of use.

So, the nylon standoffs, and the exposed polished surfaces are two things that could have been done some other way.

Here comes those compromises staring me in the face again!

thumbs up
Peake
Rex Coil 7 wrote:





I'm always in love with everything people post here, often there are jaw-droppingly good bits, but I've gotta say this is just brutally fantastic.
Isaiah
Rex Coil 7
Excellent read, thanks for sharing.
Can I suggest that you start a separate thread on the subject?
It’s worthy of its own thread (after 2018 when this thread is replaced, if someone wants to discuss stamping and finishing they’d have to bump a thread that is largely irrelevant to the topic they want to discuss).
We’re up to 15 pages already and only a third of the way through the year, so you can see how it could get messy!
Rex Coil 7
Isaiah wrote:
Rex Coil 7
Excellent read, thanks for sharing.
Can I suggest that you start a separate thread on the subject?
It’s worthy of its own thread (after 2018 when this thread is replaced, if someone wants to discuss stamping and finishing they’d have to bump a thread that is largely irrelevant to the topic they want to discuss).
We’re up to 15 pages already and only a third of the way through the year, so you can see how it could get messy!
You're absolutely correct. There actually is a thread that forum boss *sduck started that is exclusively about these old things.

Link = https://www.muffwiggler.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=197089&highlight=

I didn't have any idea that a few pictures of hand stamping were going to run away with the thread. I have actually become a bit self conscious about all of the attention in this one! It's why I sortof stopped replying to the wonderful and generous posts regarding my previous efforts ... kindof a double edged sword (I don't want those that have gone out of their way to offer props to think I'm ungrateful, and yet ... as I said a few posts back .. I never intended to ~run this thread over with a bulldozer~ either).

What I could do is to copy the handstamping info to the ~farndurk~ thread that *sduck started, and maybe trim these existing posts down (??). And perhaps replace the posts with all of the pictures with a reference to the linked dedicated thread. (??)

In any case .... there's the link to the dedicated thread. It's not in the DIY subforum, it is in the guitar/bass subforum. Shoot ... that's not really appropriate either since this information covers some pretty heavy DIY techniques.

Suggestions?

Thanks to everyone that shared appreciation for my efforts. I honestly do appreciate the uplifting comments.

At this point, it's pretty clear to me that there are people out there that would appreciate the how-tos of some of the methods I found useful ... clearly they are applicable to building synth modules. I just need to work out the best way/place to move all of this too.

Again, thank you.

Brian.

EDIT: Starting a letter stamping thread in the DIY subforum seems like the best solution (well, at this moment it does ... it may not seem like the best idea fifteen minutes from now!) d'oh!

lol

thinking .... thinking .... hmmm.....
bmoren
3x Nearness ready to go!

Rex Coil 7
bmoren wrote:
3x Nearness ready to go!

Are those buffered mults?
flts
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
EDIT: Starting a letter stamping thread in the DIY subforum seems like the best solution (well, at this moment it does ... it may not seem like the best idea fifteen minutes from now!) d'oh!


I think it still does sound like a good idea smile No need to edit the discussions / post in this thread, just start a new one with the same information you shared
(ie. your thorough reply to my post at least!) so people can easily find the info and discuss about it!
bmoren
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
Are those buffered mults?


https://www.modulargrid.net/e/other-unknown-nearness-black-and-gold-pa nel
Rex Coil 7
bmoren wrote:
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
Are those buffered mults?


https://www.modulargrid.net/e/other-unknown-nearness-black-and-gold-pa nel


http://www.quickmeme.com/img/58/589710766aca36b9ab0406dcb804042b8019a7 0c398ca5845c79bda079ead085.jpg

razz
bmoren
Rex Coil 7 wrote:

http://www.quickmeme.com/img/58/589710766aca36b9ab0406dcb804042b8019a7 0c398ca5845c79bda079ead085.jpg

razz


Did you read the description on modular grid? It's got a link out to the original thread on lines with the whole development process and to the github....

re-posting here since seriously, i just don't get it

Quote:
The idea is to have some number of input jacks (seven, here) mixed down to two output jacks, with each input representing a fixed pan position somewhere between the two extremes represented by the outputs. Plug a signal into the topmost input to send it entirely to the top output, the middle one to send it equally to both, etc.

From this discussion on lines:
https://llllllll.co/t/prototyping-nearness-a-minimal-panning-mixer-mod ule/8330

https://github.com/sarnesjo/nearness
pinoaffe
I don't know whether this already qualifies as a "build",
but i made a bunch of pcb layouts -
for "the fastest envelope in the west" by rene schmitz (uses the 7555),
for a dual version of synthmonger's 40106 VCO,
and for a pretty basic 4017-based sequencer circuit i "designed" myself.
The sequencer pcbs will be interlinkable, to allow for more steps / more channels,
and have a switch per step to either mute, reset or voice at that step.
It should output both gate and normal output per channel.

The pcbs fit on a single 10x10cm board together, so ordering from china should be pretty cheap (i'll just have to saw them myself).
I'll probably fill another 10x10 board with some other circuits, have not yet decided which circuits.
I might ask the creators for permission to post the pcb files online, but would like to first test em






is there anything obviously wrong about my layouts?
Rex Coil 7
bmoren wrote:
Rex Coil 7 wrote:

http://www.quickmeme.com/img/58/589710766aca36b9ab0406dcb804042b8019a7 0c398ca5845c79bda079ead085.jpg

razz


Did you read the description on modular grid? It's got a link out to the original thread on lines with the whole development process and to the github....

re-posting here since seriously, i just don't get it

Quote:
The idea is to have some number of input jacks (seven, here) mixed down to two output jacks, with each input representing a fixed pan position somewhere between the two extremes represented by the outputs. Plug a signal into the topmost input to send it entirely to the top output, the middle one to send it equally to both, etc.

From this discussion on lines:
https://llllllll.co/t/prototyping-nearness-a-minimal-panning-mixer-mod ule/8330

https://github.com/sarnesjo/nearness
Thanks, I think my attempt at humor was misdirected. ~Yes~ I did see and read the link. Thank you for the more in depth explanation, as well.

Seems like a useful module. cool
XPump
1 Mankato ...2 Mankato ...

Seem like every thing took a long time to get this built (years!)
...it was a very long time to get the PCBs fm MagicSmoke and a snafu in my order allowed me to get and add'l Mankato TH-201.

anyway - here is my Dual Mankato - nothing fancy to look at but these VCF's really sound great. I used concentric potentiometers for the coarse/fine


fitzgreyve
pinoaffe wrote:
(i'll just have to saw them myself).


Most PCB fab houses will do V-groove, but they'll probably charge you a premium as these are two different designs.

Don't saw (FR4 dust is not nice) - carefully score both sides using a craft knife and steel rule, then they will snap relatively easily along the score line.
Pav
screenshot:



recommend thin fingers, thin jack plugs and thin knobs ..its a tad tight when saw and cv patched for instance. Great sound from CEM3340 (W)

30 seconds of a test of the positive edge hard sync + triangle out
https://youtu.be/wjEY6U3gx2U
bmoren
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
Thanks, I think my attempt at humor was misdirected. ~Yes~ I did see and read the link. Thank you for the more in depth explanation, as well.

Seems like a useful module. cool


d'oh! hihi

It's an awesome module, really cant recommend it enough it makes stereo work so so simple its amazing. It's especially great to pair up with rings, clouds, or other modules that have stereo out. I think some absolute crazy things could happen with a sequential gate routing the stereo field.
bmoren
Just put this together and I must say that most people start with a mult as a beginner project, but I'm going to start recommending bus boards... They are dead simple, introduce you to a variety of components. and have lots of latitude, and + for true beginners (beginning their system) this is a total no-brainier project to build a PSU (trogotronic has no mains exposed) or to build a board to replace the flying cables from a 4ms or a uZeus

Rex Coil 7
bmoren wrote:
Just put this together and I must say that most people start with a mult as a beginner project, but I'm going to start recommending bus boards... They are dead simple, introduce you to a variety of components. and have lots of latitude, and + for true beginners (beginning their system) this is a total no-brainier project to build a PSU (trogotronic has no mains exposed) or to build a board to replace the flying cables from a 4ms or a uZeus

I think that is an EXCELLENT suggestion! You are absolutely correct ... it could actually suit beginners and become a useful step towards getting their new synth on line.

Well done!

thumbs up
GilgaFrank
Found the schematic of the Buchla 292 LPG, made a PCB, nearly got it right. Version 2 will be the money shot, this one's full of bodge wires at the back where I missed tracks off. Sounds incredible though!

mome rath
GilgaFrank wrote:
Found the schematic of the Buchla 292 LPG, made a PCB, nearly got it right. Version 2 will be the money shot, this one's full of bodge wires at the back where I missed tracks off. Sounds incredible though!


nice work!
soup
toppobrillo 281/2 in frac...




It's peanut butter jelly time!
Rex Coil 7
soup wrote:
toppobrillo 281/2 in frac...




It's peanut butter jelly time!
It needs more resistors ..... and ICs ..... and cowbell.
J3RK
soup wrote:
toppobrillo 281/2 in frac...




It's peanut butter jelly time!


I love these blue panels. Do you have a pic of the current system? thumbs up
soup
J3RK wrote:
Do you have a pic of the current system?


The current system is still very much a work in progress. A few things still need debugging and more stuff needs to be built, including a downlow filter I'm looking forward to! Thanks for all the frac friendly stuff you've done.

Here's another recent build, a Jürgen Haible tau phaser...




I can't believe how fantastic it sounds nanners
soup
Barton clock/divider in frac...




p.s. if you accidentally plug the microcontroller in backwards it will actually function, albeit in an utterly bizarre way!
Rex Coil 7
DOOD!!! you are really cooking with gas there! Moving along quite well.

w00t SlayerBadger! thumbs up
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
Really lovely builds, soup! Can you tell us a little bit about your panels?
soup
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
Really lovely builds, soup! Can you tell us a little bit about your panels?


Thanks! The panels are super simple and super cheap, laser cut acrylic infilled with paint pen.
Rex Coil 7
soup wrote:
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
Really lovely builds, soup! Can you tell us a little bit about your panels?


Thanks! The panels are super simple and super cheap, laser cut acrylic infilled with paint pen.
How do you remove the excess paint that may find it's way out of the engraved lettering? Do you just wipe it off before it dries?
elmegil
Been a while since I had anything to post to the build threads....
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
soup wrote:
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
Really lovely builds, soup! Can you tell us a little bit about your panels?


Thanks! The panels are super simple and super cheap, laser cut acrylic infilled with paint pen.


Cool! I've just spent the last little while looking at laser engraving videos and websites. Did you do it yourself, or have it done somewhere? I see that CO2 lasers are good for engraving or cutting plastic, but you need a fibre optic laser to engrave or cut aluminum, and they're about 10X as expensive. I wonder what a CO2 laser would do to aluminum?

I should also mention that I've just tried to bake a Lazertran panel twice, and have failed both times (lots of bubbles and blemishes) while filling the house up with noxious plastic fumes. I'm pretty much fed up with Lazertran and looking for something different, but it has to be something I can do at home.
adam
you can mark metal with a co2 - either using metal marking spray or anodised ali, the laser knocks the dye out of the ali but this needs doing with care
soup
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
How do you remove the excess paint that may find it's way out of the engraved lettering? Do you just wipe it off before it dries?


The excess paint (the a-holes Miley Cyrus )wipes off easy with some odorless turpentine, I'm sure other things work well too but that's what I had around the house. I usually clean everything up before it's fully dried but I've missed things before and had no trouble cleaning it up when it was dried with a quick wipe and a little bit of elbow grease.
soup
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
Cool! I've just spent the last little while looking at laser engraving videos and websites. Did you do it yourself, or have it done somewhere? I see that CO2 lasers are good for engraving or cutting plastic, but you need a fibre optic laser to engrave or cut aluminum, and they're about 10X as expensive. I wonder what a CO2 laser would do to aluminum?

I should also mention that I've just tried to bake a Lazertran panel twice, and have failed both times (lots of bubbles and blemishes) while filling the house up with noxious plastic fumes. I'm pretty much fed up with Lazertran and looking for something different, but it has to be something I can do at home.


I do not cut the panels myself. I've never looked much at laser cutters as I don't imagine having one in my kitchen would be the healthiest thing. I get the panels cut by ponoko which costs me $10-15 apiece which I think is reasonable.

The prices for laser cut metal are quite steep and there are lot of limitations in the materials that will work. It might be possible to do from home but I doubt it would be very economical.
soup
Blacet ever black...
Rex Coil 7
elmegil wrote:
Been a while since I had anything to post to the build threads....
Supa Killa! Very nicely done!!!! thumbs up
Moog$FooL$
soup wrote:
Blacet ever black...


kinda like that.... at least from the pic. SlayerBadger!

Blacet should do his to that sorta shine & look.... the only thing i don't like about his panel is the fine anodized feel.

Blacet Blacet Blacet
Reality Checkpoint
Just bananafied this SQ1. Quick and easy to do following the instructions here:

http://www.auxren.com/2017/12/how-to-bananafy-korg-sq-1.html

(Shame that these were the only colour jacks I had left, but hey ho!)



It's peanut butter jelly time! nanners It's peanut butter jelly time!
Rex Coil 7
Reality Checkpoint wrote:
Just bananafied this SQ1. Quick and easy to do following the instructions here:

http://www.auxren.com/2017/12/how-to-bananafy-korg-sq-1.html

(Shame that these were the only colour jacks I had left, but hey ho!)



It's peanut butter jelly time! nanners It's peanut butter jelly time!
I wish Korg offered that thing in 3U/Euro.

EDIT: Now that I look at it more carefully, it wouldn't really take a whole lot to do a bit of metalwork to fabricate an adaptive ~plate~ or brackets to mount it flush among Euro modules. The allen head screws could be used to fix the adapter plate or brackets to it. Use a right angle power cable to power it, call it done.
soup
Wogglebug...





It's peanut butter jelly time!
the bad producer
Lovely frac modules soup!
synthetek
Finally got my jasper in its case.

autodafe
My latest builds (end of april/may 2018)

Braids + Clouds
Mutant Bass, Hats and Clap
Erebus
search64

I finished these things. On to the next project...
hox3d
search64 wrote:

I finished these things. On to the next project...


Dammit. I usually don't want any Buchla but that one is the only one I'm looking after.
Watching one time Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith playing with an easel was enough razz

Where did you get the keyboard from? "Genuine" Buchla USA or ElectricMusicStore?
search64
Thanks. It's a rev1 218r clone.
donturner
Probably old news but I just got into building the Mutable modules. So far I've successfully built 3 braids and have a veils, yarns and rings in progress. Really is a lot of fun. Still can't believe that MI designs are open source!

Finished PCB
With faceplate

Would've uploaded these as images but don't have sufficient post count.
extralifedisco
Hello MW! My first post here - I just finished up the the last module to in a functional synth path for my all-DIY modular! It's 2 rows of 88HP in a homemade "eurorack" case. From left-to-right:

-M.F.O.S. VCO (very tight squeeze as this board is 130mm)
-AI Synthesis mixer
-AI Synthesis envelope
-Passive mult
-Yusynth Moog VCF
-MOTM µVCA
[blank]
-DIY Attenuator
-Power in/switch
[bottom row]
-Erica Synths DIY-MIDI-CV[/img]
-Homemade "MK107" 8-step seq (from velleman "running lights" kit 107)
-Barton Simple Quantizer



Really enjoying it so far! Need to add at least one more VCO, some attenuverter/math stuff, and some FX (just been running through my guitar pedals for now, works well enough!). I recorded a little jam last night to show off some of the sounds. Enjoy: lol

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JTIbva5DVwk
OB1
extralifedisco wrote:
Hello MW! My first post here - I just finished up the the last module to in a functional synth path for my all-DIY modular! It's 2 rows of 88HP in a homemade "eurorack" case. From left-to-right:

-M.F.O.S. VCO (very tight squeeze as this board is 130mm)
-AI Synthesis mixer
-AI Synthesis envelope
-Passive mult
-Yusynth Moog VCF
-MOTM µVCA
[blank]
-DIY Attenuator
-Power in/switch
[bottom row]
-Erica Synths DIY-MIDI-CV[/img]
-Homemade "MK107" 8-step seq (from velleman "running lights" kit 107)
-Barton Simple Quantizer



Really enjoying it so far! Need to add at least one more VCO, some attenuverter/math stuff, and some FX (just been running through my guitar pedals for now, works well enough!). I recorded a little jam last night to show off some of the sounds. Enjoy: lol

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JTIbva5DVwk


Nice! Do you have any more info about that 107 sequencer? Looking to DIY an 8 step seq and that looks wicked.
extralifedisco
OB1 wrote:

Nice! Do you have any more info about that 107 sequencer? Looking to ADIT an 8 step seq and that looks wicked.


Sure, I mostly just followed the instructions from MirlitronOne in this video:
MK107 Sequencer on Youtube

The velleman kit can be had here for $8.50
MK107: Velleman: LED Running light kit on Jameco

The first modification I made of course is to swap out the 9v battery for +12v and ground leads. I just used some wires soldered to a 5-pin header, which plugs into the eurorack power connector (make sure to get it right so you don't use -12v).

The only other mod was to add a clock in/out. You have to cut one trace and then add 2 wires - one on the output of the 555, and the other on the input of the shift register. Wire those to the pins of a switched mono jack and you have a clock input, wire the 555 to another and you have an output. I believe that configuration sends the clock out inverted from eurorack standard, so it might be better to send it through a TL072 and invert first. But that makes the switching a little more difficult and I don't have any other clocks modules to verify my theory. Anyhow it seems to work fine receiving clock from my MIDI interface but I suspect it may be offset from the master clock by a few ms because of the inverted signal and pulse length.

Also MirlitronOne recommends using silicon schottky or germanium diodes - I didn't have any on hand so I used 1N4148 and I have to say the range is a bit fiddly - a whole lot of travel at the edges of the scale. Probably better to follow his advice!
Rex Coil 7
extralifedisco wrote:
Hello MW! My first post here - I just finished up the the last module to in a functional synth path for my all-DIY modular! It's 2 rows of 88HP in a homemade "eurorack" case. From left-to-right:

-M.F.O.S. VCO (very tight squeeze as this board is 130mm)
-AI Synthesis mixer
-AI Synthesis envelope
-Passive mult
-Yusynth Moog VCF
-MOTM µVCA
[blank]
-DIY Attenuator
-Power in/switch
[bottom row]
-Erica Synths DIY-MIDI-CV[/img]
-Homemade "MK107" 8-step seq (from velleman "running lights" kit 107)
-Barton Simple Quantizer



Really enjoying it so far! Need to add at least one more VCO, some attenuverter/math stuff, and some FX (just been running through my guitar pedals for now, works well enough!). I recorded a little jam last night to show off some of the sounds. Enjoy: lol

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JTIbva5DVwk
LIB! (that's southwestern desert hippie for "well I'll be!") ... nice video, killer little tune! That little synth sounds really X! ("excellent") Serious now, it sounds really nice and ff..ff..ff..fat-az mang!

How well does the Barton quantizer work? I have 3 Dual Nice Quantizers I have yet to complete (they were given to me about 1/3rd built by one of our members). So I'm curious as to how well you like it?

thumbs up nice swing at it ....so please ...



OB1
Thanks extralifedisco! Gonna give that a go for sure!!
rob cruickshank
I made a clock divider with a symbol nixie for a display:

Video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xsLKz8NmFss
Jarno
Damn cool, how'd you do it?
appliancide
Finished up (mostly) two perfboard projects this weekend. First was the Echo-Matic tape delay (more details in this thread).



Second one is Ian Fritz's Fretter ribbon controller. I don't have a panel made for this one yet, but I am going to play it as-is during a gig I have coming up in a couple of weeks. I'm going to stick the ribbon right to the top of my Ikea case. IKEA Rast That gig, along with the fact that I found myself with a few extra softpot ribbons*, motivated me to build this. In addition to the panel, I need to order the right value cap for the sample and hold. It works pretty great already though!



The echo was built without a layout. I just made it up as I went along. The circuit was perfect the first time, though I did spend several hours troubleshooting it, before figuring out that the audio problems were due to the tape deck I was using. I laid the ribbon controller out beforehand, and still made a few mistakes (in the layout and during the build) that had to be tracked down. The moral of the story is "just wing it, and it will work". Ok, the real moral of the story is that I need to start laying out actual circuit boards.

*I've been slowing planning and acquiring parts for a pair of Appendage ribbon controllers. I ordered three Softpot ribbons, so I would have a spare. After I got the parts from Mouser, I decided that the Thinpot ribbons were going to work better for me. I sent a message to Mouser's support asking if I could return and/or exchange the Softpot ribbons. They responded by refunding my money and telling me that I could discard the Softpot ribbons instead of returning them! Discard?! Oh yes, they will be discarded. One down, two to go. twisted
Rex Coil 7
Speaking of ribbon controllers;

I bought a Dot Com 20" ribbon controller. I took the full length walnut stick off of it, and mounted the ribbon directly on to the walnut top of the QKB61 5 octave controller kybd using the same two screws that normally attach the ribbon to the walnut stick. The ribbon is actually attached to a 0.125" thick aluminum strip that runs full length of the ribbon, that is what I removed from the walnut stick. I placed it on the kybd so that if I find a spare $520.00 in the clothes dryer or a pants pocket in the laundry a second ribbon controller can mount right next to the existing one without about 1.0 inch between them.





They transmit signals for horizontal movement as well as pressure. There's also a gate trigger momentary button on the aluminum block at the left end of the ribbon (the little black ~dot~ on the block is the momentary button).

So .... yea ..... ribbons!

applause
Synthbuilder
I finally got around to putting a front panel overlay onto my new ADR30 analogue delay project.



The case is a cheap Takachi YM-300, available from various places but I got mine from RS Components in the UK for about twenty pounds. The front panel overlay is a 1.5mm thick Scheaffer engraved panel which was about 25 pounds. The nice thing about the overlay method is that it hides any problems with the drilling of the main case. For the first time I didn't use the paint infill on the text. This cuts the price down considerably and still looks fine.

The Takachi project cases are made from thin aluminium - painted black on the outside of the lower part and a sort of a shiny brushed finish on the top. It's very easy to drill - perhaps too easy to drill as one can easily makeyour holes too big when using a cone cutter. Note the use of an oversized washer to hold the power socket as I made the hole just too big for the socket's outer flange.



The whole thing turns out quite neat:



More information about the project can be found here:

http://www.oakleysound.com/ADR30.htm

Tony
roglok
Looks and sounds great, Tony! Any plans for voltage control of frequency and feedback?
Monkizzle
Nice and easy triple VCA in 3hp.
srsly never

Synthbuilder
roglok wrote:
Looks and sounds great, Tony! Any plans for voltage control of frequency and feedback?


Delay time is voltage controllable via a socket on the rear panel. But feedback isn't. However, it's got a separate delay only output which could be fed through an external VCA which could then be summed back into the input.

If I ever get around to doing a modular version of the ADR30, it'll have voltage control over all parameters. But the main reason for doing the ADR30 was to test out some ideas I had which are going to be used in the effects section of the standalone Oakley Mysterious Audio Plaything synth. More details on that one later.

Tony
Rex Coil 7
Synthbuilder wrote:
I finally got around to putting a front panel overlay onto my new ADR30 analogue delay project.



.... For the first time I didn't use the paint infill on the text. This cuts the price down considerably and still looks fine....

Tony
Indeed, it does look fine without any infill. However, a bit of advice on that choice;

If you use a large type face the engraving process used may leave visible tool traces. Said another way, when they engrave characters that have ~thick~ lines, rather than using a "thicker tool" and a single pass, they use a small tool and make several passes. When completed, the individual passes are easily visible. There may be a few issues I overlooked when I designed this panel, since it was my very first attempt using Front Panel Designer (I have since used it several times with excellent results ... experience is everything)

For example, look carefully inside of the larger letters. You can easily see each pass that was made by the engraving tool that was used in the mill. There are several factors involved that produce these anomalies. A dull/worn tool, the incorrect travel speed, incorrect tool RPM, incorrect tool choice, as well as combinations of any of those factors.

The first image is of an enclosure that is roughly 4.5" x 2.25" (for context), the second image is more of a close up.





Clearly, infilling would have hidden the machining marks. Granted, I allowed FPD to automatically select the tool when I designed the panel. Had I known the consequences ahead of time, I may have made a different cutting tool selection myself instead of allowing the program to select a default tool.

So just be aware that this can happen if characters that are larger than the tool FPE uses to cut those characters, there may be visible tooling "signatures".

Tony, nice looking enclosure! I really love the doubled panel look (used it myself on a construct). Another advantage that choice offers is should you decide to change any of the controls (add more, use fewer, whatever ..) you may simply design another panel without having to use another enclosure. You can have the front panel of the enclosure itself look like swiss cheese with a dozen holes, the cover panel hides many evils.

cool
rob cruickshank
Jarno wrote:
Damn cool, how'd you do it?

The clock is just a schmitt trigger oscillator (the pot is reverse-log so it has nice linear responce) that feeds a dual counter chip which provides on one side the divide outputs, and on the other side the address to a nixie decoder. I used a Russian K155ID, which is equivalent to the hard-to get 74141. There are outputs for clock, inverted clock, and a 1ms pulse at the clock rate as well as the divide outs. The nixie is a IN1V: https://tubehobby.com/show_det.php?det=19
and the power supply for it is the one found here, with a MAX1771 substituted for the obsolete 771. http://www.electricstuff.co.uk/nixpsu.html
Reese P. Dubin


I have a bunch of stuff to add here when i take the time to shoot some pictures. In the meantime I just finished this yesterday when it arrived in the mail.

Synthesis Technology E370 Quad Morphing Oscillator in 4U.
This is really recalibrating me completely.
Cutting the window and SD card slot by hand would have been very hard but i had the fortune of being able to trace my pals panel before w assembled his unit.
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
Synthbuilder wrote:
I finally got around to putting a front panel overlay onto my new ADR30 analogue delay project.



Beautiful build, Tony! However, I think that you could have used a few more zip-ties on those wires.
Rex Coil 7
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
Synthbuilder wrote:
I finally got around to putting a front panel overlay onto my new ADR30 analogue delay project.



Beautiful build, Tony! However, I think that you could have used a few more zip-ties on those wires.
Nerp .... spiral loom .... brightly colored spiral loom.




meh lol applause hihi w00t thumbs up
ucacjbs
A couple of builds (been a while!)

First off, Oakley Classic VCA, behind a frontpanel express panel -- took the hole positions from Tony's fpd file changed the font a bit and added the boundary line to match a few other FPE red panels in my synth.




Secondly, a headphone amp for my test bench. Basically a single channel version of AV500's 4HP. I completely goofed on the panel design -- time running out on my ponoko intro offer, so a late night session resulted in a panel with the following problems:
1) 3.5mm jack holes too small d'oh!
2) Forgot hole for volume pot d'oh! d'oh!
3) Panel not actually 3U height, but a bit bigger. very frustrating

1 and 2 fixed by a few minutes with my drill press. 3 not critical, since my test bench 'rack' is a couple of pieces of wood that I just drill holes into as necessary. Phew.





My first layout since 1988. Works fine, but I used the standard OSH park pad size, which is basically minute and a real pain to solder. Also forgot to clearly label the panel wires on the silk screen. Once all soldered, it did work first time, so that's a plus. It's peanut butter jelly time!
Synthbuilder
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
Beautiful build, Tony! However, I think that you could have used a few more zip-ties on those wires.


thumbs up

Yeah, I put one in the middle at first. But the damn thing wasn't straight enough to be out of the way for some of the photos I wanted to take. It's 24/0.2 wire so it doesn't bend that easily. So I put another tie in, which made it look asymmetrical and didn't look right so I added another couple more.

But now you mention it... I could probably put a few more on there. Dead Banana

Tony
Rex Coil 7
ucacjbs wrote:
A couple of builds (been a while!)

First off, Oakley Classic VCA, behind a frontpanel express panel -- took the hole positions from Tony's fpd file changed the font a bit and added the boundary line to match a few other FPE red panels in my synth.



Really nice looking panel. Is that red anodized aluminum? I've been using their "natural" anodized aluminum panels with black infilled lettering. However, I've been thinking about trying something different, like red or blue. The ~beige~ looks pretty nice as well.

I like the border you added. Looks classy.

Well done! thumbs up
motormenace
Finally got a chance to finish this. Really nice filter....[/img]

robpiya
After reading multiple forums it seemed that the first thing I needed work on was a decent power supply for my modules. I have 3U/84HP of modules now and before starting my second row I wanted to put my time and energy on making a good power supply and power distribution. I would like to thank Graham Hinton, Rex Coil 7, Zaibach (along with many others here on Muffwiggler) and Oscar Salas over at Electro-music for all their knowledge and advice. Without their sharing of information on power supply design this project would not have been possible or even conceivable.

I wanted to start off with a simple LM317/337 design which could power about two rows of modules (750mA-900mA). Many here on Muffwiggler suggest to go for multiple supplies than rely on one big one which made sense and since managing the heat + heat-sinking from larger supplies is a challenge, I started out with a >1A supply. I chose a 50VA toroidal transformer (2x15V) which is regulated to +/-12V (I don't use 5V). I used the schematics provided by Oscar of the LM317/337 design and got Oshpark to make me a few copies.


After putting everything together and testing with a dummy load (16 ohm power resistor) for a few hours the temperatures on the regulators/bridge rectifier seems to be hovering around 55C (ambient 22C). I will be putting a cover over the mains area (transformer, switch and terminal barrier).


I guess there was no point designing the supply if I wasn't going to upgrade the power distribution from flying ribbon cables. So as Graham Hinton has expounded in so many threads, I went with the busbar distribution.


Of course I had to also make cables for the busbar distro (I know I used mixed colors for which I will be reprimanded).


Now onto making a case for the supply and start making some more modules!!!
ucacjbs
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
Really nice looking panel. Is that red anodized aluminum? I've been using their "natural" anodized aluminum panels with black infilled lettering. However, I've been thinking about trying something different, like red or blue. The ~beige~ looks pretty nice as well.

I like the border you added. Looks classy.

Well done! thumbs up


Thanks! Yep, red anodized, no infill. The border was inspired by the old EMU modulars, and went from a proper copy of that (but in red) to a token echo of it when I found out how much that amount of machining would cost.

robpiya - that power system looks great. I’d love to build one myself, but the idea I could thread all those holes without goofing up is a fantasy.
robpiya
ucacjbs - Thanks! I just used these drill/tap bits with a cordless drill (which can be put in reverse) which made life much easier.
These are found everywhere on amazon or even at a hardware store near you. Good luck!
Rex Coil 7
Thoroughly impressive. Very nice work, Member *robpiya. Well thought out, excellently executed, with room left for expansion.

And thank YOU for allowing some of my ramblings to help you move forward. Anytime I learn that I've actually helped someone it truly makes my day better. May 29th is always a rough day for me (personal issue), so to learn of your progress and knowing I provided a few molecules of information that you found useful makes today a better day (thank you for that).

Really nice work. I'd advise making a dedicated project thread for your progress, as I am certain others would follow along. It may also be easier for other people to locate your efforts while searching.

Your bus bars and PSU panel prove what I've been preaching from the stump for several years ... and that would be "you do not need a mill (or even a drill press) to make bus bars ... or any other nicely done work for that matter".

And extra points sent your way for actually testing your work prior to using it. As far as the wires being different colors on your power cables ... I'm sure the world will continue to go 'round.

Good job! Please, do carry on!

thumbs up
Rex Coil 7
ucacjbs wrote:
robpiya - that power system looks great. I’d love to build one myself, but the idea I could thread all those holes without goofing up is a fantasy.
What Member *robpiya has done is great. However you do not have to use threaded holes as long as you have a way to gain access to the back side of the bus bars for nuts and lock washers. If you DO have room for underside access of the bus bars, you can also use the underside to attach power cables on both sides of the bar.

I understand that not many people's cabinets provide the space to mount the bus bars in such a way that they'd have access to both side of the bars. But, in the event you can design your cabinet in such a way that would provide two sided access to the bars, you may just use drilled holes without having to thread them. Perhaps mounting the bars to the sides of the cabinet, and making a removable back panel. Just a thought.

In my own situation, I was able to locate the bars so I could access both sides of the bars easily. That meant NO THREADING! (thank the gods!). If you are able to mount the bars so they have 2 sided access, make certain the holes are spaced far enough apart so that the tool used to tighten (or hold) the nuts won't interfere with surrounding nuts or washers.

TOP SIDE (if you look carefully you can see a large hole beneath the bars):



BOTTOM SIDE:





FRONT VIEW (this gives you a front perspective, which may help to provide understanding of how I was able to go about creating two-sided access to bus bars that are able to feed modules in two rows.



Lastly, I would suggest using "gas tight paste" on the eyelets of the power cables where they come in contact with the aluminum bus bars. This practice will help to prevent oxidation from forming between the power cable eyelets and that bare aluminum that bus bars are made of. There's also zinc crystals mixed into the paste, which cut into the aluminum surface (to penetrate the ultra thin layer of oxidation that forms within milliseconds of machining or sanding the aluminum surface of the bars, or any other aluminum surfaces where electrical connections are made).

The brand I used is called "OxGard", it comes in 4oz tubes (like toothpaste) and costs ~around~ $6 or $7 on eBay. It may be called "OxGard 4", but that's not some other compound, the "4" just means it is a 4oz tube. So you may run across "OxGard 4" ... or even "OxGard 8" ... but it's all just the same ~OxGard~ stuff in different size tubes. If you are in the UK or EU, I'm not sure what stuff like this is called. One 4oz tube will be enough to make a half dozen 40-module synthesizers. The tubes look like this....



This is what the OxGard paste itself looks like - I squeezed an entire 4oz tube of it into the clear plastic container to make it easier to stir it thoroughly before use, as well as use a toothpick or small brush like what comes on a fingernail polish bottle for applying it. Look closely and you will see the zinc crystals mixed into the paste, they look like sparkles. If you place a small amount between two fingertips, and rub them together you'll feel a "grit" in the paste. That grit is the zinc crystals. The paste itself (the grease-like substrate) is electrically conductive and helps to improve conductivity of terminations.





It may also be used where the barrel of each jack contacts the metal panel of your module. So for DIY modules, you have the opportunity to use gas tight oxidation preventative paste between the panel and the jack (as well as any lock washers you may or may not use).

Here's a shot of one of my own DIY modules where I used gas tight paste on both sides of the lock washers, as well as on the panel itself and the barrel flange of the jack. Look closely right exactly at the tips of the arrows in this picture and you can see the paste on both sides of the lock washers. Just wipe off any excess after you've installed each jack. Be sure to use some type of disposable cloth (paper towels?) because if you use a cloth to wipe it off, and you end up using that same "bench rag" to wipe something else off, the zinc crystals in the paste may scratch the hell out of the surface. So use some type of throw away wipe to clean off the excess paste.



~Fin~ cool
appliancide
These bus bar systems look impressive, but they strike me as approaching "audiophile" territory. No offense to you guys, and the really nice work you've done.

Are there any before and after measurements out there showing improvements for a given modular synthesizer setup? I know that more conductor = less resistance, but what kind of current draw are we talking before bus bars really start showing improvements over regular bus boards? Why don't people use copper bus bars?

Please don't take this as a criticism of what you guys are doing. It certainly can't hurt to over-engineer any part of your synth, and it looks cool too.
Rex Coil 7
appliancide wrote:
These bus bar systems look impressive, but they strike me as approaching "audiophile" territory. No offense to you guys, and the really nice work you've done.

Are there any before and after measurements out there showing improvements for a given modular synthesizer setup? I know that more conductor = less resistance, but what kind of current draw are we talking before bus bars really start showing improvements over regular bus boards? Why don't people use copper bus bars?

Please don't take this as a criticism of what you guys are doing. It certainly can't hurt to over-engineer any part of your synth, and it looks cool too.
Thanks for the compliments, and thanks for your interest in this type of power system. The last year or so these ideas have been gaining quite a bit of traction here in Miffwugglers. For good reason (they work).

The very first thing you need to address is that manufacturers typically take the path of least expense. They know that the single largest deterrent new customers face is the cost of power and power distribution. It isn't sexy, it makes no sound, it doesn't look cool, there's no knobs and switches to fiddle with. It is just something that really makes potentially new customers shy away from getting into modular. So manufacturers typically offer the least costly gear that will provide voltage to a module. The power systems aren't designed "up" to an engineering spec, they are designed "down" to a cost.

The other (and probably the worst) issue is that most folks design their cabinets around convenience and how many modules they want. The power system is then engineered and installed as an after thought. When ideally it should be the other way around .... design the power system first, then design the cabinet around it.

That said, we start from a clean slate, and begin to design the power system from vapor. You use the best possible way to power the modules that add up to THOUSANDS of dollars. It always strikes me oddly that so many people are willing to use crap-ass power systems for powering their multi-thousand dollar module collection. Are they not even worth investing 10% of their net value into a solid and reliable power system?

Bus bars don't cost shit. Mine are 28 inches long, made of actual bus bar aluminum alloy (6101 T61). The entire set of bars have less than $20.00 worth of material in them.

http://www.onlinemetals.com/merchant.cfm?pid=18142&step=4&showunits=in ches&id=1282&top_cat=60

Making your own power cables comes to about $2.50 per module. Connecting the bars to the power supply is the critical juncture. You want the wire attached to the output turret (or stud, or whatever ~thing~ is used to tie wires to the output rails of the power supply) to be as thick and as short as absolutely possible. Accomplish this, and everything else goes smoothly. It's all just a matter of doing things right the first time. Remember that modicum of respect towards your thousands of dollars investment in modules I mentioned? It begins with making a decent power system.

COPPER vs ALUMINUM: Copper bus bars would weight a shit ton more, and they cost a lot more as well. They also corrode badly, with this green shpoo forming on the surface. Copper also doesn't hold up well when threaded holes are needed, the copper is so soft the threads easily strip out.

Aluminum bus bars have nearly the same conductivity, and if you want the same as copper just use more aluminum (it really is just that simple). It's much lighter in weight, and is far more durable against corrosion, as well as much less costly. Threaded holes hold up far better as well.

I'm not aware of any actual noise tests, but Graham Hinton has posted many times the correlation between each millivolt of added resistance to every decibel of added noise. As far as performance is concerned, just do a search on "rene not working properly" or "pressure points not working without licking my finger".

In the end, anyone may do whatever they wish to do inside of their own synths. I went with bus bars, because I feel them to be the "apex predator" of power distribution systems. I did it because I can. I did it because it comes closest to satisfying the textbook correct method of distributing power. I did it because it produces the least amount of problems (especially with zero volt return impedance issues, which cause noise floor issues and problems with digital modules). I also did it because I find most commercially available bus boards to be poorly designed, and poorly executed.

And I did it because it permits me to use the best power cables available .... DIY cables. There are resistance issues at every single termination, and most power cables use shit for connectors. Especially in the Euro camp. Ribbon cables are bad enough, but "soft bus" ribbon cable busing systems are the absolute worst (32ga wires? really?).

So there ya have it.

The same question could be asked of people that insist on using the best modules they can afford. Why? Because they want to. They want their synth to be the best they can build it. Same goes for patch cables, speakers, headphones, whatever.

Bus bars also provide a certain degree of independence. I can make (or repair) all of my own power cables with a box of eyelets, some 20 gauge (yes, twenty gauge) aircraft wire and a set of $25 crimpers. I can expand my system nearly indefinitely by adding more heavy cable, more aluminum, and making more power cables.

I even go as far as using MilSpec aircraft wire, 19 strand, fiberglass reinforced Teflon insulated. I also use stainless steel screws everywhere.

I mean, the question shouldn't be "why?" ... but rather "why not?".

seriously, i just don't get it

More information on what I've done in my own synth (regarding power) may be found on the page in this link. My project synth thread is twelve pages long now, this takes you directly to page 11. Scroll down about half way to a post entry with a name at the top of "POWER DISTRIBUTION HOWS WHYS WHATFORS AND MORE EXAMPLES OF MY BAD MATH:" in large letters, which are blue in color.

Link to page eleven = https://www.muffwiggler.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=78836&start=250

Here's an excerpt taken from that post in that thread:

Rex Coil 7 wrote:
......
So here's how the Dot Com setup distributes power, from one cab to another. The wire lengths and gauges are very important, and will be referred to a number of times. This is the QDH20, it has 20 module power cables all soldered together at one end (in "nodes") and module multi-connectors at the other ends. 10 of the cables are 24 inches long, and ten of the cables are 36 inches long. There is a 16 gauge set of wires that connects the "squid" to the Power Supply using a MOLEX connector. The 16 gauge wires are 12 inches long. The PSU is also fitted with a set of 16 gauge wires that are soldered to the PSU's output "turrets", that set of 16 gauge wires are also 12 inches long. Connected together, this 16 gauge bundle is 24 inches long, total, with a "termination" (MOLEX connector) in the middle.



So, you plug the MOLEX connector on the "squid" to the MOLEX connector on the PSU to put it all together. Then you plug each module power cable to each module. Done.

This "squid" uses a soldered connection of all 20 module power cables and the 16 gauge wires that run to the MOLEX connector using what I call a "solder wad". The "wad" is the main distribution "node" that divides up power from the power supply to each individual module power cable. Here's the "wads" unmasked with the wire nuts removed.



Now moving forward, if one chooses to add a 2nd cabinet, what Dot Com offers to get that done is an "Interconnecting Cable" called the "QIC" which comes in several lengths from 12 inches up to 48 inches in length. It is made with 24 gauge wires. What is also needed are 2 Q103 DC connection modules. These modules connect to the "squid" by using one of the 24 gauge module power cables plugged in to the Q103 in back, which provides the DIN connectors on the front of the Q103 with DC power. The pair look like this ....



Then, the QIC Interconnecting Cable is plugged into the front of the Q103 in the DIN connector of Cabinet 1, routed as needed and plugged into the Q103/DIN connector mounted in Cabinet 2. Lastly, the Q103 in Cab2 is connected to the "squid" inside of Cab2 by using one of it's 24 gauge module power cables (essentially a copy of what was done in Cab1).



Then the remaining module power cables of the "squid" used in Cab2 are plugged into the modules of Cab2.

WHEW!!!!

HERE'S WHAT THAT ALL LOOKS LIKE IN A DIAGRAM:

Take note of the number of connection points (which create resistance and can be potential failure points), as well as the sheer lengths of the wires involved. I erroneously labeled the MOLEX connector as an "AMP" connector, but you get the idea. Everything on the LEFT of the thick maroon line is "CAB1" and RIGHT of the maroon line is "CAB2".



At best, the wire lengths of 16 gauge and 24 gauge are:


24 inches of 16 gauge wire (split in half by the MOLEX connector).

8 FEET of 24 gauge wire spread out between squid and inter-cab connection cables.

At worst, the wire lengths of 16 gauge and 24 gauge are:

24 inches of 16 gauge wire (split in half by the MOLEX connector).

13 FEET (!!!) of 24 gauge wire spread out between squid and inter-cab connection cables.

So, at worst, the module farthest from the PSU has to have it's power come through 2 feet of 16 gauge wire, and 13 feet of 24 gauge wire. At best, the module farthest from the PSU has it's power travel through 2 feet of 16 gauge wire and 8 feet of 24 gauge wire.

Damn.

MOVING ON TO THE BUS BAR SETUP:

It starts in the 12U Cab by running the 16 gauge wires that are soldered to the PSU output turrets to studs mounted in wooden "X-Blocks" (cross blocks), which are also used to attach the bus bars to the cabinet. These 16 gauge wires are 4 (four) inches long each. They are connected to the bus bars using crimped on eyelets on each wire which are then bolted to the bus bars. Current then flows though the 12 inch long bus bars to large and heavy aluminum "lugs". Class K 1/0 welding cable is connected to the bus bars using those aluminum lugs. The cables are routed through "pass through holes" in both cabinets and connected to aluminum lugs on bus bars in the Main Cab. Module power cables are then connected to all of the bus bars using #8 eyelets on the cables and #8 stainless steel screws, backed with lock washers and nuts, which are both also stainless steel. The power cables are simply cannibalized Dot Com power cables taken from a disassembled (~cut apart~) Dot Com "squid".

Using a diagram, here's what it all looks like. Again, pay attention to the lengths and gauges of the wires used, as well as the number of connections and "type" of connections.



Here's another diagram that depicts what this will all look like (to provide context, I've put the picture of the back of this synth beneath the diagram to make it easier to make sense of what you're looking at)....





So what does all of this work out to be? Well, I've learned from others in this forum that the wires that run from the PSU turrets to the distribution system (aka bus bars) need to be as SHORT as absolutely possible. In the system I cooked up with the bus bars being vertical instead of horizontal, those 16 gauge wires are only FOUR INCHES LONG. By comparison, the stock Dot Com distribution setup the 16 gauge wires are TWO FEET LONG with a MOLEX connector in the middle! 4 inches vs 2 feet, I'd say that's a massive improvement.

Also, current sent to the module farthest from the PSU in the stock Dot Com setup must travel through as much as 13 FEET of 24 gauge wire and 2 FEET of 16 gauge wire, with several connections/terminations along the way. With my bus bar rig, current sent to any of the modules farthest from the PSU travel though 4 INCHES of 16 gauge wire, and an average of 4 feet of really large, really heavy aluminum bus bars and copper cable (that cable weighs nearly a half pound per foot, by the way). All of the 24 gauge module power cables are no longer than 12 inches. And since those cables are at the module, their resistance is less "bad" (ugh ... my vocabulary ... geez!).

Here's some figures taken from internet tables.

24 gauge wire has 25.67 mOhms per foot.
16 gauge wire has 4.016 mOhms per foot.

The Dot Com system:
13 feet of 24 gauge = 333.71 mOhms.
2 Feet of 16 gauge = 8.032 mOhms.
Totalling 341.742 mOhms.

And that does not include any of the connections/terminations.

The bus bar system:
4 inches of 16 gauge = 1.0 mOhm.
12 inches per module of 24 gauge = 25.67mOhms (which is less important since the module itself has far more resistance).
Totalling 26.67 mOhms.

26.67 mOhms vs 341.742 mOhms. I don't know what that works out to in decibels of noise, cross talk, and other evils ..... but ... it certainly works out to less voltage drop.

I wasn't able to locate a resistance calculator on line that could show the resistance of 12inches of 1/0 cable, or the bus bars. Best I kept coming up with was quite a bit less than 1 mOhm per FOOT (it may even be less than 1mohm per INCH!!). Essentially, the two bus bar groups along with the welding cable and the heavy aluminum lugs work out to be "one long bus bar" rather than a sortof daisy chained set of two bus bar sets. I say that because for my purposes, the combination of 6101 T61 1/4" x 1.0" aluminum bus bar and 1/0 cable provides low enough resistance to "consider it to be one long bus bar".

I'm certain as I can be that there are people within this membership that could work out the resistance figures in a sharp second, but I'm not one of them. To be very candid, I honestly don't think I possess the raw IQ required to comprehend such things. I certainly don't have the education required, that's for sure!

At the very least, even if there could be better ways of doing what I'm doing, it's a damned sight better than the stock rigging! I mean, 24 inches of 16 gauge and 13 feet of 24 gauge (plus connections) is beat to hell by 4 inches of 16 gauge, 4 feet of bus bar, and 12 inches of 24 gauge power cables! NO. DOUBT. ABOUT. IT.

Just to give this subject one last jab (and provide a bit of visual impact), here's picture of 1/0 welding cable, 16 gauge stranded wire, and 24 gauge stranded wire. The two small stranded wires are both cutoffs from the Dot Com squid.




seriously, i just don't get it
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
I think these busboards are very cool looking, but let's be honest: from an Ohm's law standpoint, they are overkill to the tenth power.

Here's what I do to power a cabinet: I make a power distribution PCB with four very wide traces for the +V, GND, GND, -V configuration of the MOTM standard (which is what I use), and I heavily tin all of those traces with solder until they are about two millimeters thick. I use 18-gauge wire to connect modules to the distro board, with MTA-156 connectors at both ends. I use two wires for ground (again, like MOTM). The cables are custom made for each module depending on its position in the cabinet, so none of the cables are more than about one foot long.

If there is a millivolt of drop anywhere in my system due to ohmic loss, I'd be very surprised.

To give a slightly different perspective, 18-gauge is the same wire (or maybe it's a bit thicker than) in most AC power chords. These power chords are carrying much more current than anything in a modular cabinet, and they don't get even slightly warm. If it's good enough to carry 120V AC, it's more than good enough to carry 12 or 15V DC, so why even worry about it?
medbot
I'm over here getting carpal tunnel from scrolling through Rex's novellas waah razz
elmegil
medbot wrote:
I'm over here getting carpal tunnel from scrolling through Rex's novellas waah razz


Need to get a pad where you can use finger gestures instead of a scroll wheel

;-)
Nntblst
HI:

This is my first post in Muffwigler, a lot of my friends tell me that I should be here if I wanna research on my DIY modular stuff.

This is a Passive Mult and Blank Panel I made a few weeks ago...

The construction material is Acrylic, cut and etched in a Laser CNC, there is no PCB on the back so to improve the mechanics on the module, I put a pair of ribs in the back.

Jay F.
Two builds from Befaco this month.

A*B+C : https://growyoursynth.blogspot.com/2018/05/a-b-c.html



Rampage : https://growyoursynth.blogspot.com/2018/05/befaco-rampage.html

extralifedisco
Wow, that busbar system is really serious! Some of that cable routing reminds me of TV station cabinets. I just use a homemade busboard with some solid core wire threaded through some perfboard. Cheap as chips, though I did spring for some shrouded header connectors this time. I sometimes wonder if it the ampacity is sufficient but it's not like I've got vacuum tubes in there. lol

Anyway the whole hobby is a money-sink; who here is is fit to cast the first stone for gilding the lily a bit? I'd probably have a lot more aluminum in my case if it didn't take me 45 minutes on the bus to get to the metal shop. I put some little angle brackets on the edges of my case for protection and it makes me feel like it's a real pro system even though it's just 1/4" plywood.
beautyofdecay_
I finished my version of the Midibox MBSEQ V4 sequencer.
It has 4 MIDI IN/OUT, 8 CV OUT, 8 GATE OUT, 8 DIGITAL OUT and 8 SYNC OUT (CLK, START/STOP) all build into a 19 inch case.





I wrote a blog post on my website with more details: https://www.ecalpemos.nl/2018/05/30/midibox-sequencer-mbseq-v4/
roglok
beautyofdecay_ wrote:
I finished my version of the Midibox MBSEQ V4 sequencer.
It has 4 MIDI IN/OUT, 8 CV OUT, 8 GATE OUT, 8 DIGITAL OUT and 8 SYNC OUT (CLK, START/STOP) all build into a 19 inch case.





I wrote a blog post on my website with more details: https://www.ecalpemos.nl/2018/05/30/midibox-sequencer-mbseq-v4/


eek!
Rex Coil 7
I'm going to lead off with this; I don't expect anyone else to do as I do. I'm not saying everyone else is doing things wrong, and I am doing things right. It comes down to this .... it's my synth, and I'm doing what I see as best. Everyone else may do whatever they wish with their own synths. I am in the midst of building a complete project, soup to nuts. Along the way, I have the opportunity to improve on some of the ill-conceived things that manufacturers offer us. So I am making the best of that opportunity. Think me foolish, think me silly, think me going overboard to the ten power. I simply do not care. This is what I want to do with my synthesizer. And I offer my most sincere best wishes to those that wish to take another path.

Moving forward .....

Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
I think these busBARS are very cool looking, but let's be honest: from an Ohm's law standpoint, they are overkill to the tenth power.
Mmm .. says you. hihi I obviously disagree.

Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
Here's what I do to power a cabinet: I make a power distribution PCB with four very wide traces for the +V, GND, GND, -V configuration of the MOTM standard (which is what I use), and I heavily tin all of those traces with solder until they are about two millimeters thick. I use 18-gauge wire to connect modules to the distro board, with MTA-156 connectors at both ends. I use two wires for ground (again, like MOTM). The cables are custom made for each module depending on its position in the cabinet, so none of the cables are more than about one foot long.

If there is a millivolt of drop anywhere in my system due to ohmic loss, I'd be very surprised.
Hmmm ... well, I don't know about that ... you may wish to get out your meter and calculator (and prepare to be "very surprized"). 18ga wire has 6mOhms per foot of resistance. At 15v? ... hmmm .. dunno man. And it all begins to add up as we go further into this. And how long are the leads going from your PSU to the distro board? See what I mean?

Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
To give a slightly different perspective, 18-gauge is the same wire (or maybe it's a bit thicker than) in most AC power chords. These power chords are carrying much more current than anything in a modular cabinet, and they don't get even slightly warm. If it's good enough to carry 120V AC, it's more than good enough to carry 12 or 15V DC, so why even worry about it?
Using 18ga wire on module power cables doesn't really do much since the module itself is pulling about 20+ohms all on it's own. Efforts made near the module aren't as critical as they are in the distribution system. Especially where the PSU connects to the distribution system. 18ga may be ok in that location, as long as it is very very short. Online charts say 18ga wire has 0.006+/- ohms per foot of resistance (6mOhms, right?).

Eyelets bolted to bus bars have less resistance than AMP or MOLEX connectors, not to mention the connection cycle life of eyelets vs molded plastic connectors with tin plated pins. With eyelets, you also have the opportunity to use gas tight paste (which helps with making better conductivity between the eyelet and the bus bar).

The bus bars and the doubled 4 inch long 16ga wires (two 16ga wires in parallel) from each turret to the termination where those doubled 16ga wires connect to the bars are very low resistance numbers (0.5mOhm for 4 inches of doubled 16ga). The bus bars themselves come out to less than one mOhm per foot. I'm using about 2.5 feet per rail, added to the 0.5mOhm dual-16ga link from the turret to the bus bars, we're at less than 2.5mOhm total resistance. Probably more like 2.0mOhm.

I did a rough test on the Dot Com squid ...

Dot Com (PSU turrets to the end of the module power cable) = 341.742 mOhms.

My bus bars system (PSU turrets to the end of the module power cable) = 26.67 mOhms.

Graham Hinton has posted a number of times what resistance decrease vs voltage drop vs noise level ratio is. It's difficult to reject the math he presents. At this exact moment, if I am recalling what he's said correctly, 10milliohms works out to 7.5mV of drop. The resistance reduction in my system (315.072 mOhms less resistance over the Dot Com) works out to (roughly) be 420mV LESS voltage drop than the Dot Com system. Nearly half a volt. Moving the sense leads from the turrets to the bus bars will also help to add to the cumulative efforts.

Since the bus bars come out to about 2mOhm from turret to end of bar, that works out to 1.5mV drop ... vs over 420mV for the Dot Com system.

I think ... there's a solid chance I got mixed up in all of that.


And since you mentioned the AC power cables, the one for my 5U is about a foot long, the one for the Euro cab is also about a foot long. They meet in a custom junction box. The main power cable that goes from the wall socket to the junction box is about 6 feet long. Adding up all that was removed from EIC cables and the main power cable that connected the power strip I was using, that comes to almost 20 feet of main power cables removed. The reduced length is not about some effort to make the power leads shorter, it's about making the ground lead as short as possible. All part of a cumulative effort to reduce the ground system's impedance.

We still haven't discussed the connection cycle ratings of the multi-pin connectors power cables use to connect to bus BOARD systems. Or the resistance across those terminations.

It's all part of a cumulative reduction of resistance, combined with a cumulative reduction in impedance, combined with a cumulative reduction in noise, cross talk, and signal bleed. When you take cumulative measures, it adds up very quickly.

Anyone may do as they wish. I'm not telling anyone that they're doing things ~wrong~ ... I just have the opportunity to optimize my system in every way possible .... so I am. Right down to replacing black oxide screws with stainless steel screws, installing steel threaded inserts for mounting the modules in the wooden cab, and using truck bed liner as the cabinet finish. I get asked what I am doing, so I explain it. But I'm not saying "I'm right, you're wrong" about anything (I'm not directing this at you, Doc, this is just a general statement).

What I am saying, is that I have the opportunity to make the best possible system using as close to best practises and methods as I can. In the end, I'm absolutely certain I will have no regrets for doing so. But anyone else may do whatever they wish to with their own synth.

POTATO
.... POTAHTO. seriously, i just don't get it

thumbs up

(unsubscribed - not mad or having a hissy fit - just trying to keep my number of subscribed threads under better control - if you wish to correspond please feel free to send me a PM, I'll be happy to hear from you - thanks!)
AlanP


Very fun polysynth smile

I'm going to have to sit down and give it a thorough programming at some point, and chain it through a load of guitar pedals.

Also, could the whole power distro please get it's own thread?
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
Rex Coil 7, I honestly think your busbars are cool. Unnecessary, but cool.

My Power One power supply generates 1.5A on each rail. If I were to put that entire current through one foot of 18-gauge wire, with its 6 mOhm of resistance per foot, then Ohm's law dictates that the voltage drop would be 9 mV. My 15V would drop to 14.991V.

Presuming that a given module consumes 100mA of current, then the one-foot cable to the module will lose 600uV. Again, this is really not worth considering.

Yeah, I'm not gonna lose any sleep over this.
Isaiah
AlanP wrote:
Also, could the whole power distro please get it's own thread?


+1
Definitely worthy of its own thread and it’s kind of off-topic here.

Enjoy your Ambika, Alan!
SoundPool
Not doing so much building these days, but have been getting some different PCBs made up recently. Heres a ring mod I made. Your classic passive, free standing but with mini jacks and a bottom PCB for short protection, trying to keep it compact. Also added a "carrier feedthrough" switch, which I've found quite handy. Sort of using the classic passive carrier bleed problem as a feature, the switch then also feeds the carrier into the modulator input, offering some new sounds at the flick of a switch.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BhPFspIBXMF/?taken-by=slowsmallsounds
autodafe
I took a break from Eurorack Modules and Wired a Meeblip Micro I found locally for 20 euros shipped
Housed in an old Lacie Hard Disk case, it's the exact same size as the Volcas ;-)



Synthiq
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
I wasn't able to locate a resistance calculator on line that could show the resistance of 12inches of 1/0 cable, or the bus bars.

If i got it right, 12 inch 1/0 cable is 113uohm and a 28 inch bus bar is 117uohm. On the other hand, the output resistance of the power supply is 10mohm so it will dominate the resistance of your power distribution so I tend to agree with those saying this is overkill for the supply voltages. Especially if the modules have a RC filter at the input with a 10ohm resistor, in which case the resistance in the power bus and cables can be ignored.

I do agree that a low resistance in the ground is important to maintain a good signal to noise ratio in the system. But my gut feeling is that the system could be improved significantly by simply splitting the ground into a quiet analog signal ground and a noisy digital ground that acts as a return path for microprocessors, LEDs and other noisy and high current signals.
ear ear
@beautyofdecay_: SlayerBadger! screaming goo yo w00t hyper Guinness ftw! cool we're not worthy applause
Jarno
Made a eurorack friendly version of the Buchla 144 square wave oscillator:

Giant knobs on there, think they are about 25mm.



I first built one, then two more, but one of those latter ones does not work, it still is a slightly finicky circuit.....
AlanP
Jarno, that is pretty sweet grin

No sawtooth jack?
ashleym
I am with you on the rocker switches. I much prefer them to toggles and have them all over my MFOS stuff. The Serge is growing without them seriously, i just don't get it
appliancide
Because I'm a glutton for punishment, and I wanted to get some stuff built for a performance I had last weekend, I've built 11 modules in the last month, plus the tape echo and ribbon controller posted a couple of pages back.

An old friend asked me to help him put together his first modular synth. Since I'm getting back into performing, I decided to build some of the same modules for myself.

His stuff:


My stuff:


The pace of my building bit me in the ass with the null-A2 modules. I spent all day today fixing the errors caused by my speed run. What a cool a panel though! Most Serge panels have fewer functions than this 42hp mini-synth!

Obviously the two null-A2s were not part of my set, but the rest of it was, even my friend's stuff (the a-155 is a truly great sequencer).

Final thought: Kits are totally worth the mark-up.
edit: Final thought 2: There's no substitute for sunlight when photographing gear.
Jarno
AlanP wrote:
Jarno, that is pretty sweet grin

No sawtooth jack?


Fresh out of jacks smile
Use the thonkiconns mostly, since they are PC mount, need to get a bag of the other jacks from Thonk. Not all jacks have enough thread on the bushing to allow them to be fitted to 3mm acrylic front panels.

ashleym wrote:
I am with you on the rocker switches. I much prefer them to toggles and have them all over my MFOS stuff. The Serge is growing without them seriously, i just don't get it


Yeah, bought a bunch of them (C&K) on ebay, really nice, but I am not quite there on determing location and size of the cutout, needed to file quite a bit away in my pristine lasercut panels..... Especially on another PCB which had 1/4" jacks, the cutout was off by about 3mm.

As an aside, little bit fed up by IMGUR, I regularly get missing pictures, it sucks.

appliancide wrote:
Because I'm a glutton for punishment, and I wanted to get some stuff built for a performance I had last weekend, I've built 11 modules in the last month, plus the tape echo and ribbon controller posted a couple of pages back.

An old friend asked me to help him put together his first modular synth. Since I'm getting back into performing, I decided to build some of the same modules for myself.

His stuff:


My stuff:


The pace of my building bit me in the ass with the null-A2 modules. I spent all day today fixing the errors caused by my speed run. What a cool a panel though! Most Serge panels have fewer functions than this 42hp mini-synth!

Obviously the two null-A2s were not part of my set, but the rest of it was, even my friend's stuff (the a-155 is a truly great sequencer).

Final thought: Kits are totally worth the mark-up.
edit: Final thought 2: There's no substitute for sunlight when photographing gear.


Looks great! Awesome amount of SMT grin
djs
Jarno wrote:
Made a eurorack friendly version of the Buchla 144 square wave oscillator:


Is this a PCB that will eventually be made available to other people?
Monkizzle
I've always wanted a MiniPops to mess with so I finally built one by myself. Just the amazing code from Jan Ostman, a fistful of spare components, some wood off cuts I had lying around et voila! I also add a built in reverb and customized rhythmic patterns. Kick it!


Jarno
djs wrote:
Jarno wrote:
Made a eurorack friendly version of the Buchla 144 square wave oscillator:


Is this a PCB that will eventually be made available to other people?


Well, if one orders PCB in China, one gets 10 of them, and I do not need 10 of them myself, so I do have some spares. I do not usually order a second round of PCB's as mine are not THAT popular smile
Also, it is decidedly not a paint by numbers affair, you get a schematic and layout, BOM if you like, and that's it. Plenty to go on for a DIY-er IMHO.

Let me know (PM) if anyone wants a board, it'll also include the switch, so you do not have to order it at Mouser.
ClausF
Monkizzle wrote:
I've always wanted a MiniPops to mess with so I finally built one by myself. Just the amazing code from Jan Ostman, a fistful of spare components, some wood off cuts I had lying around et voila! I also add a built in reverb and customized rhythmic patterns. Kick it!



Great! applause applause applause
sicpaul
Just finished two little helpers in 4HP, i call them cut-CV-generators. They differ only in the switches (push type vs hand gear).

I allways use a very slow LFO, Key-CV and an EG for filters but most commercial VCFs do only have two CV inputs. So i combined an ADSR (from Yves Usson) and a simple Tri-Core LFO (modified T.Henry design, rates from 4 min up to about 50 Hz) running trough two attenuverters mixed together with mutable Key-CV. Since i normalled Key-CV and Gate inputs with those comming from Doepfer Connector, i may fully control a filter with using only 1 extra cable.

dot matrix madness
sicpaul wrote:
Just finished two little helpers in 4HP, i call them cut-CV-generators. They differ only in the switches (push type vs hand gear).

applause Nice! How did you make the front panels?
sicpaul
dot matrix madness wrote:
sicpaul wrote:
Just finished two little helpers in 4HP, i call them cut-CV-generators. They differ only in the switches (push type vs hand gear).

applause Nice! How did you make the front panels?


Laser cutting white (opaque) acryl, filling engravings with black edding marker.
bmoren
simple but effective

passive 2hp stereo output

https://www.modulargrid.net/e/other-unknown-stereo-output
https://github.com/bmoren/Stereo-Output-2hp




av500
I built a case, it suits me fine



khakifridge
av500 wrote:
I built a case, it suits me fine



That is so bloody cool. cool cool cool
das_Produkt
av500 wrote:
I built a case, it suits me fine





Be careful with the handle while carrying and try to hold it by the sides.

I built my first case out of a similar case with exactly the same fake leather handle, and the handle broke after a year.

av500
thanks for the warning, indeed the handle is flimsy. in fact I already replaced the back hinges with proper Adam Hall hardware smile
Lemmy
It's a Eurorack case! You can tilt it! Or you can lie it flat.









I've uploaded the project files here:
https://github.com/mike-kelly/tiltable-eurorack-case
pulsesynthesizers
Made this quad LFO.
Wave and mode selection via central rotary encoder, frequency and modulation control per LFO.
16+ wave types.
8+ modes.
Dual outputs per LFO, one for wave and one for gate / sync.
Two CV in's per LFO for pitch and modulation.
RGB rate LED's for each LFO show different modes


Jarno
Fancy!
monstrinho
pulsesynthesizers wrote:
Made this quad LFO.



Given the chip used, I'm guessing that this is a "platform" that could be reprogrammed to be any number of different things? This looks very cool!
scottrod
Completed a Haible Subtle Chorus using vintage components from Small Bear. I used a Hammond enclosure with a Triad toroidal transformer for power. Quality components throughout, lots of soldering! Used bipolar Muse caps for the audio couplers. Socketed the expensive chips, hard-mounted everything else. Had a couple of bad HA1457W's at first, everything else was fine. Shielded wires inside for all the audio.

The boards were the originals they're selling now on his old site; they soldered up 'ok', but I've worked with better. The via's are beginning to oxidize from age. I mean it was fine and I'd do it again, but if you have a board set lying around you plan on getting to someday, they're not getting any younger. Probably should have given it a vinegar bath first to etch it a bit.

Sounds great, low noise floor, no hum. Complaints are it has to be powered up to bypass (unlike the original), there's no wet/dry control, and the effect itself is just a hair more phase-y than I would prefer, but it's still a remarkable effect. My favorite settings are 3 & 4 (of the 6 available).

I didn't keep track of cost, but it was over $500; not the bargain you might hope for if you're looking to get into a Dimension D on the cheap. Would consider using the TL072's instead of the HA1457W's as well, I doubt they add much to the overall sound. I could be wrong...

Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
It's funny to see such an elaborate circuit with one knob! nanners
scottrod
I hear that. If 'less is more' then I'm bustin'.

Lot's of work for one knob. Dead Banana
pulsesynthesizers
monstrinho

Yeah it could be programmed to be anything with a voltage output.
Jarno
scottrod wrote:

The boards were the originals they're selling now on his old site; they soldered up 'ok', but I've worked with better. The via's are beginning to oxidize from age. I mean it was fine and I'd do it again, but if you have a board set lying around you plan on getting to someday, they're not getting any younger. Probably should have given it a vinegar bath first to etch it a bit.


Had this on a SN76477 voice pcb from state machine on e-m I bought, I used fine steel wool to remove the oxidation, and it was OK after, but not great.
What kind of vinegar did you have in mind? The cleaning kind? I also have some citric acid for descaling of chrome taps in the bathroom, would that work?
namke
Hi All,
I've been working on making useful things out of ATTiny85's, and I'm now fairly happy that the first device is ready for a wider audience.

I'd be interested in getting some wider opinions on what I've done (Friends seem to like it and are interested in buying kits/prebuilt devices, so that's good; I've used it a few times in live performances so that's also good!)

I think that it is a decent starter project (more useful IMHO than yet another multiple), and should take less than 30 minutes to construct.

Here's a video of the first one being assembled (construction takes somewhere around 10 minutes here):



(There is a 'raw' demo at about 12 minutes into the construction video)

And here's an audio demo:



I'm thinking of selling them as kits or prebuilt, in person or online (also at the gigs that I put on)

Description

The firmware is a simple "1.5 oscillator" wavetable synth:

Oscillator 1 resets the phase of Oscillator 2 to zero every time that it cycles (this is basically what used to be called hard sync).

Oscillator 2 is a wavetable oscillator (waves below);

VR2 affects the frequency of oscillator 1;
VR3 affects the frequency of oscillator 2.

If the frequencies are integer multiples then the output sound can be quite smooth, but richer sounds are heard when the oscillator frequencies are not harmonically related at all!

The 8 bit PWM output runs at 50kHz sampling rate (250kHz PWM).

There are four basic wavetables available to oscillator 2, as well as four intermediate positions - these are selected with VR1:

Sine
Sine + triangle
Triangle
Triangle + square
Square
Square + sawtooth
Sawtooth
Sawtooth + sine

VR0 changes the waveform randomly to a greater or lesser extent, so as to add some more texture to the output!

Any feedback is welcome smile

Thanks for your attention!
scottrod
Jarno wrote:
Had this on a SN76477 voice pcb from state machine on e-m I bought, I used fine steel wool to remove the oxidation, and it was OK after, but not great.
What kind of vinegar did you have in mind? The cleaning kind? I also have some citric acid for descaling of chrome taps in the bathroom, would that work?


I've not actually done it but it makes sense from a chemistry standpoint. and vinegar is dilute enough to make it easy, just adds time. I'd use regular white vinegar from the grocery store. Have not heard of using citric acid. I would think 30 minutes or so in a bath would do it, rinse well with distilled water.
elmegil
I have a mildly abrasive eraser thing I've used to clean oxidation off PCBs. Works great. The main problem is, I have no idea where I got it, or what it's called. I believe it's related to what model railroad enthusiasts call "track eraser" but track erasers are typically branded, and so probably overpriced for what they are.

Jarno
Pumice? Or is it more of a rubbery thing?
elmegil
More of a rubbery thing. Definitely not pumice, that's TOO abrasive.
appliancide
I’ve used pencil erasers successfully in the past.
monstrinho
appliancide wrote:
I’ve used pencil erasers successfully in the past.


+1

The white erasers seem to work better than the pink ones, in my experience...
emmaker
I would wait until I was going to use the board before I clean it. It will just oxidize again and lose more plating when cleaned again.

I use two different methods to clean boards. First is regular cleaning powder like Ajax or Comet, water and a paper towel. The other is an eraser. It use to be Pink Pearls were good but the last few I bought didn't seem to have any abrasive in them so they didn't clean well. They make ink erasers that have different 'levels' of abrasive material in them going from coarse to fine. While not cheap I use ones with the finer grit. Then where the board is clean I take it and wipe it down with isopropyl alcohol to get rid of any residue.

Back in the day we use to use Pink Pearls to clean edge connectors on circuit boards. Eventually the plating would were off so you had to be carefull.
mcop
I've still got the tail end of one from my days of etching pcb's in the 80's. Not sure this is exactly the same but RS seem to still do them:

https://uk.rs-online.com/web/c/pcb-prototyping/pcb-cleaning/pcb-cleani ng-scrub-blocks/

elmegil wrote:
I have a mildly abrasive eraser thing I've used to clean oxidation off PCBs. Works great. The main problem is, I have no idea where I got it, or what it's called. I believe it's related to what model railroad enthusiasts call "track eraser" but track erasers are typically branded, and so probably overpriced for what they are.

elmegil
Looks very likely to be the same, thanks! There is one face of the one I have that's like a rubber sheet, that was down in my photo.
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
When I want to freshen up a PCB, I just give it a once-over-lightly with fine steel wool.
Jarno
+1


Also, I built this:

A studio preamp in eurorack format, only needed line/di input, and wanted it in a non API 500 format so I made this. The circuit is based off of a germanium preamp found on the GDIY forum.
The transformer is an API2503 clone from russia, US guys can also order one from ClassicAPI.
Rear:
DEEMARKAY
Sequential Switch from Fonitronic
I screwed up that front panel. Luckily acrylic can be reattached to itself with dichloromethane. But having been working with acrylic for quite some time now, I'm tired of drilling those by hand. It's very time consuming and with the possibility of shattering and having to redo or repair the panel, can be quite discouraging.
So I'm thinking of getting one of these chinese 40W Lasers and redo all of my panels with engraving and all.





With this build I discovered a new method of fixing the perfboard to the front panel for myself, bending the smaller pin of a thonkikonn jack outwards, through the perfboard and soldering it on the other side. The construction is solid enough and means no fiddling with extra mounting parts.

DEEMARKAY
Befaco InAmp

First aluminium front panel with toner transfer labeling in front. Still stuff to be learned. I actually prefer acrylic, since all my panels are white acrylic, but in this case the panel kept breaking because of the big hole of the 6.3mm jack (salvaged from some broken tapedeck or CD-Player).



Jarno
Acrylic will always be a bit delicate if you try to drill big holes, but there are two different varieties, cast and extruded, one is more expensive than the other, and one can be machined easier than the other. But have you looked into a service like ponoko or formulor?
DEEMARKAY
I have looked, but it seems you need yet another account to use formulor.
I try to keep as much as possible offline.
A big part of this DIY endeavor for me is the learning experience, so getting a laser would tag into that plus I already made illustrator layouts as drilling templates anyway.
AlanP






Buchla 281 Quad Function Generator clone. Some minor issues with this one (CV inputs for attack and decay need air-tenuators, very sensitive right now), but other than that I'm happy with it.
haebbmaster
Some Serge / Ken Stone stuff:
(the tape is attached to protect the corners)







robpiya
Here is another Befaco build - Midi Thing. A very handy Midi to CV converter with four CV and four Gate outputs.



DEEMARKAY
haebbmaster wrote:
Some Serge / Ken Stone stuff:
(the tape is attached to protect the corners)

https://www.muffwiggler.com/forum/userpix2/32862_img_3751_1.jpg


https://www.muffwiggler.com/forum/userpix2/32862_img_3752_1.jpg


https://www.muffwiggler.com/forum/userpix2/32862_img_3753_1.jpg



How are those pretty panels of yours made? If you don't mind my asking.
OB1


6 months in the making... Not 100% DIY, but the vast majority is, including the skiff case/PSU. A handful of factory builds, a couple of kits, the rest from PCBs or built from scratch on stripboard or perma-protos.
ClausF
Wasp 2018... applause applause applause
soup
I bought this wonderful Goike frac (?!) case secondhand last year and have been slowly building a synth to fit it. It ended up sort of like a minimoog who didn’t like school and hung out behind the gym smoking dope with the drum machines or something. I’m pleased as punch…



action shot...

It's peanut butter jelly time! nanners
Reese P. Dubin
soup wrote:




action shot...

It's peanut butter jelly time! nanners


this is awesome. bless the banana trailblazers!
euro size panels or frac??
it bears quite a resemblance to bugbrand, but also not at all
zemm
Great looking stuff in this thread yet again!

I've taken it slower for the beginning of the year. Done minor 5U stuff and currently cutting/drilling uninteresting clone panels (of existing modules) to fill in the winter.

But I thought that these from the spring might be somewhat interesting - at least from the usability perspective, they have been a great imo.




It's just rows of simple "2 in 2 out" mixers, and I'm using these for control signals. These are located in the middle of my setup. The first inputs are connected to Beatstep Pro (notice the matching coloring on the first one). The second one proxies drum triggers.

Now the cool thing is that I usually just use control modules like Mutable Grids and step sequencers, and these allow me to patch those modules to the other inputs and leave the Beatstep Pro and it's wiring untouched. Added bonus is that the akwardly positioned befatsep outputs are now more accessible.




I usually don't like protoboards at all, but I wanted these quickly. I'll propably draw some more with KiCad+SMD later on for Keystep etc.

batchas
Reese P. Dubin wrote:
it bears quite a resemblance to bugbrand, but also not at all

Indeed.
It's interesting to see these knobs on blue panels (which also augment the difference).
soup
Reese P. Dubin wrote:
this is awesome. bless the banana trailblazers!
euro size panels or frac??
it bears quite a resemblance to bugbrand, but also not at all


Thanks! It's all frac and yes, heavily influenced by bugbrand (and all the great stuff posted in this forum!) I think the case was originally made to house bugs too.
hox3d
soup wrote:
I bought this wonderful Goike frac (?!) case secondhand last year and have been slowly building a synth to fit it. It ended up sort of like a minimoog who didn’t like school and hung out behind the gym smoking dope with the drum machines or something. I’m pleased as punch…



action shot...

It's peanut butter jelly time! nanners


Really nice! Such a beauty.
One thing, though: did you think about inverting the upper row panels?
That would make the workflow nicer, maybe, by keeping the controls above patchpoints?
soup
hox3d wrote:
Really nice! Such a beauty.
One thing, though: did you think about inverting the upper row panels?
That would make the workflow nicer, maybe, by keeping the controls above patchpoints?


Thanks! It's funny my first thoughts were inspired by the softsynth(!) aalto and had all the bananas in the center of the case. But once I figured out that the 3/4" frac grid and the banana shorting jack were the same size and I could do some simple normalization with them I ran with that instead.
ashleym
OB1 wrote:


6 months in the making... Not 100% DIY, but the vast majority is, including the skiff case/PSU. A handful of factory builds, a couple of kits, the rest from PCBs or built from scratch on stripboard or perma-protos.


But it is 100% you. Really great work. You have achieved so much in a short space of time. Looking at your links, I assume this is getting used a lot. Are you enjoying having a hands on instrument, especially one you've created yourself? is it letting you make music in a new way?
OB1
ashleym wrote:


But it is 100% you. Really great work. You have achieved so much in a short space of time. Looking at your links, I assume this is getting used a lot. Are you enjoying having a hands on instrument, especially one you've created yourself? is it letting you make music in a new way?


Thanks! I’ve literally just finished building it, so I haven’t taken it out yet, but I’ve been using it the studio while I’ve been building. I plan to incorporate it into my live set though. I’m loving it so far. I first knew that I was going to build this machine about 20 years ago, it just took me a while to get started! I’m definitely working differently to how I have done up til now. I used to use a lot of hardware synths/samplers years ago, but I’ve been stuck in the box a bit more recently so the time felt right to get back to some hardware and fulfil a dream I’ve been meaning to for a long time!
the bad producer
Lovely work soup, I used to make banana frac but not nearly to the same level of quality! nanners It's peanut butter jelly time!
STOJ
Reverse Landfill Noise! with optional mods.

sduck
After some 8 months of toil, finally at a point where I can show this off. This isn't even for me, built it for a fellow wiggler. It's not completely done, there are a bunch of spots for mods on this panel, but I need to take a break from this, get some room to breath for a few moments. Currently it's at the state these were originally produced as - I got to work with a few of these back in the 70's, and this is really close to that experience.





elmegil
love
frozenkore
sduck wrote:
After some 8 months of toil, finally at a point where I can show this off. This isn't even for me, built it for a fellow wiggler. It's not completely done, there are a bunch of spots for mods on this panel, but I need to take a break from this, get some room to breath for a few moments. Currently it's at the state these were originally produced as - I got to work with a few of these back in the 70's, and this is really close to that experience.

woah Looks great!
Jarno
Looks great!

So, not a straightforward project then?
Moog$FooL$
nice job sduck!!!

thumbs up thumbs up thumbs up
soup
the bad producer wrote:
Lovely work soup, I used to make banana frac but not nearly to the same level of quality! nanners It's peanut butter jelly time!


Thanks! My diy frac adventures started with wanting to build some Haible stuff and going through the threads I saw a few pictures of your banana frac stuff. I really dug what I saw and they were some of the things that drew me to frac!
Reckless_Experimenter
Because we all run out of spots to plug in our gear. I decided to fix it for myself once and for all. Each bank of 6 plugs has its own switch, and there is a 9 foot cord to plug it into the wall.

I did this a few months ago, finally getting around to uploading a picture.
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
Holy crap, sduck! So, is that a "kit" or did you lay out the PCBs yourself? I see that the panel was "designed in Belgium" so I'm assuming that this is something you bought. What's the deal? I'm lovin' how those 3 PCBs plug into those edge connectors.
motormenace
I wanted something with a tube in it and would glow, so I built this....

STOJ
sduck
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
Holy crap, sduck! So, is that a "kit" or did you lay out the PCBs yourself? I see that the panel was "designed in Belgium" so I'm assuming that this is something you bought. What's the deal? I'm lovin' how those 3 PCBs plug into those edge connectors.


Thanks! It's a conglomeration of things - the PCBs are from Derek Revell in England ( http://www.phutney.com ), the panel is from (user name I've forgotten) in Belgium, made the case myself. Parts from all over the place. It was actually bought as a supposedly mostly assembled project by a guy in Philly from a guy in Germany, and sent to me to complete. Based on what I was told it was going to be a 2 month project. Because a lot of things weren't as done as I'd hoped it ended up being an 8 month project, and it's not even done yet.
Monkizzle
Freshly built this easy but useful euro utility, 4 independent manual switches for audio and cv. Passive, 4hp in black alluminium. Cheers Guinness ftw!

motormenace
Finally finished building a Clouds that was my girlfriends birthday present...

Monkizzle
In these day I have tons of free time so I build a reverb/delay module in 3hp hacking a simple pt2399 circuit.
Wet/dry and time pots are also controllable via cv.
krainov
Kobol Expander I build
XPump
Just finished a Barton VC CLOCK/DIVIDER
I did one in MOTM size years ago ..this be Euro now.
I used 2mm LEDs - less light show -and clearer looking indicators by far.
Design is one off M.Bartons 1st.
This has CV controlled PW and a random mode switch .
which is much fun .This is known

YashN
Built the interconnected four main components of my Analogue Modular today:

1. First set of modules

2. Clean power from DIY Linear Regulated PSU

3. Power Distribution

4. Case to host the modules

Thanks to elmegil, Yves, Thomas Henry and Matthias, Geoff Hinton and all others tirelessly working on their builds and posting pics to inspire others such as myself, sharing their knowledge and for helping me on my build as well.






FetidEye
LEGO 6987 Message Intercept Base (1988)

I've rebuild this set I had as a child. Some parts were missing, so I've substituted those. Sadly, I did not have the yellow rails anymore,
so the base is now movable by hand instead of rotating the knobs.
The manual in those years was very spartan. No BOM available smile




ClausF
FetidEye wrote:
LEGO 6987 Message Intercept Base (1988)

How does it sound?
FetidEye
Prrrree pieuw piew wiep wiep wiep beeeb chhhhhhhh "ENEMY SPACESHIP DETECTED" CCCCHHHHHHH WHOOOOOOH beep tk tk tk tk "ALL YOUR BASE ARE BELONG TO US"
ClausF
Cool, will grab the Eurorack Version... Guinness ftw!
appliancide
Just finished these yesterday.




[/img]
tobb
elmegil wrote:
I have a mildly abrasive eraser thing I've used to clean oxidation off PCBs. Works great. The main problem is, I have no idea where I got it, or what it's called. I believe it's related to what model railroad enthusiasts call "track eraser" but track erasers are typically branded, and so probably overpriced for what they are.



I try to find the same thing,you can polish raw aluminum with it to give it a shine like a mirror right?

In fact this was sold to clean the bottom of flat-irons!!

Its in complete rubber like material.

If any knows where they can be found please pm me.
elmegil
tobb wrote:
I try to find the same thing,you can polish raw aluminum with it to give it a shine like a mirror right?

In fact this was sold to clean the bottom of flat-irons!!

Its in complete rubber like material.

If any knows where they can be found please pm me.


Someone not much further down in the thread from me pointed at these:

https://uk.rs-online.com/web/c/pcb-prototyping/pcb-cleaning/pcb-cleani ng-scrub-blocks/
das_Produkt
appliancide wrote:
Just finished these yesterday.

[..].

[...]


What does it do?
I see a DUSG, but can't identify the other part.
appliancide
das_Produkt wrote:
appliancide wrote:
Just finished these yesterday.

[..].

[...]


What does it do?
I see a DUSG, but can't identify the other part.


The bottom middle is a dual attenuverter with an OR (peak) output. Above that is a 4-input mixer. The rounded boxes are Ian Fritz 2Q/4Q multipliers (aka VCA/ring mod). And, as you figured out, the ends are a DUSG with mods for gate or switch-controlled hold and cycle, and end-of-rise outputs.
sduck
Science!

Very cool. Rockin' Banana!
das_Produkt
Thank you. That sounds like a nice assortment of functions.
pix
appliancide wrote:
Just finished these yesterday.




beautiful! we're not worthy
j450nn014n
here's a video of my first from scratch build. Designed and laser cut the plate, got the idea for the pent-attenuator from some circuits I found I think on the doepfer site, and then the name from MFOS' oct-attenuator. I wanted to do something so simple that i could do it. It has no power, and does very little, but is is great between a Dixie2+ and mutable shades. Here's a video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ah8Mz2-Uwpk

The cool bit is that I didn't plan for the red glow. It just happened.
Next time I'll add resistors! And then caps. And op amps!

This is way more fun than building kits.



djthopa
Hi!

Great post and lots of great information and builts.

I dipped my toes on dying eurorack modules 5 years ago, and i had a boy and later a girl, so priorities changed a lot.

Now that im more or what settled and with my own room! Im back to trying to diying..

This time i have approached things somewhat differently, and i felt interested on the arduino - eurorack thing.

I have built a few modules, mostly different versions of the ardcore..

Also got some blank acrylic panels from razorlab and have been having a few ideas coming out.

I somewhat feel that since i dont have more space on my rack, i might start selling the non diy modules and replace them with my builts, dont know why but it feels like the diy modules have some kind of soul of their own!

Anyway some pics of the progress, please easy on me smile

prototype of ardcore finished:



Picture file



Picture file






dot matrix madness
A 440Hz generator from analog monster.
Added a control LED and rectangular wave output. Indendended as
frequency reference to calibrate piano tunnig computer programs.
Cheap tuning forks are usually less precise than this quarz oscillator
(which is according to my frequency counter 439.9 Hz)

j450nn014n
dot matrix madness wrote:
A 440Hz generator from analog monster.
Added a control LED and rectangular wave output.


Thanks for this! I was just wondering how to do my first powered prototype. Never thought of doing it that way (L brackets) and was at a loss.

I actually NEED an single fixed tune note general for calibration, so I might try this after I get my next one done.
acgenerator
OB1 wrote:


6 months in the making... Not 100% DIY, but the vast majority is, including the skiff case/PSU. A handful of factory builds, a couple of kits, the rest from PCBs or built from scratch on stripboard or perma-protos.


You should open for Styper!
wackelpeter
It's not finished yet, but i began a next Cabinet with another two VCS, the EMS s&h/Glide/g&h with the schematics from Jürgen Haible, Ian Fritz Hypster Chaos, also another 2 LPG, 2 of Foniks Quantizers (+/-5 Volt, 4 channels) and 2 3 channel DC Mixers, another Buchla S&H is Ready and Needs to be tested and wired on a front Panel... that's the one with the 3 rows sitting on top of the keystep or the 3rd from the bottom

After i ran out of space in my shelf for my synth boxes and the i fear that it would collapse some day under the weight, i decided to move some of them out of the shelf and stack them on top of each other… Looks okay to me, has the Advantage that i can deconstruct the whole in a few minutes and thus transportating would be Pretty easy...

As i saw recently a thread About Ikea shelfs as cases/racks, my own are simple wooden racks made out of cheap wooden plates i bought at a local home worker supply store and they already sawed them at desired lengths…
as rack for the mounting of the Panels i use some old/used 19" racks i have sometimes acces to at work… the modules are all on stripboard with flexible wires to the front Panel.
The Panels that are blank like the one at the height of the keystep but in the box Right next to it, are blind Panels from our IT stuff i use as passive mults and spread them all over the place to have Always Access to an mult and in case i run out of Long patch cables…

Guess this should be my last Cabinet... have no more space and spent too much time with soldering, Debugging and Drilling so far…
When you know that this is the result of 3-4 years of DIY you might get an Impression About my soldering time vs playing some music timing Ratio...

Enough is enough and the good Thing is i don't Need a Christmas tree anymore, i have more than enough of blinky Lights.... smile

Reckless_Experimenter
Module based around the Electro Smith FV-1 DSP

zarar
Monkizzle wrote:
In these day I have tons of free time so I build a reverb/delay module in 3hp hacking a simple pt2399 circuit.
Wet/dry and time pots are also controllable via cv.


Any chance you could share schematics? we're not worthy
j450nn014n
zarar wrote:
Monkizzle wrote:
In these day I have tons of free time so I build a reverb/delay module in 3hp hacking a simple pt2399 circuit.
Wet/dry and time pots are also controllable via cv.


Any chance you could share schematics? :hail:


Yes please. I'd like that as a challenge. I'm just beyond the basics and can make my own from a kit, but I'm looking for a 'from scratch' that I can handle at this stage of the learning curve.
ashleym
wackelpeter wrote:
It's not finished yet, but i began a next Cabinet with another two VCS, the EMS s&h/Glide/g&h with the schematics from Jürgen Haible, Ian Fritz Hypster Chaos, also another 2 LPG, 2 of Foniks Quantizers (+/-5 Volt, 4 channels) and 2 3 channel DC Mixers, another Buchla S&H is Ready and Needs to be tested and wired on a front Panel... that's the one with the 3 rows sitting on top of the keystep or the 3rd from the bottom



It’s tricky and churlish to be anything but in awe, so I will joke - is it much fun playing the floor level modules?
sduck
wackelpeter wrote:
It's not finished yet,



whoa

Can we get some details about what all this is? Pictures of the individual panels? Please? Looks amazing!
wackelpeter
sduck wrote:

Can we get some details about what all this is? Pictures of the individual panels? Please? Looks amazing!


Yepp, for sure will post some more detailed descriptions module list, etc. when back from work and try to get some better detailed pics of the panels...

For now i can say, that each module is on stripboard, connected to the panels via felxible wires, i have easily access to them and the boards are mounted on rests of bigger plastic installation cable conduits, where i mount my boards with 3mm screws and plastic holders... so i can easily pick up a certain module and troubleshoot, modifiy, etc.

All the aluminium brief case boxes are powered with some traco voltage converters and powered with 230V mains, just because i didn't liked to have some big transformators in my boxes and the cases were much easier to connect to safety earth, while with a 19" rack with various single panels theoretically you would connect earth to the mounting rack but the single modules with their front plates, can't be connected to earth properly and the 2 or 4 screws holding it in the rack are not a really safe and low resistance connection...


So i kept my wooden boxes powered up with AC wallwart PSU's which works fine for me unless you connect too much load to them... usually use 1 to 1,5A types and have a max load of 600mA on the secondary output of my PSU, so far didn't recognized any voltage drops or crosstalk, keeping fingers crossed...


@ashleym

Well i fear it's not age-appropriate but at least until now it keeps me flexible... smile

I also have to admit that it may be not the best thing to have some modules on floor level, but i have no other space left to make two of them or otherwise if i would have put something under it, then i wouldn't reach the upper cabiet anymore with my 1,86m height... so i have to make compromises... the earliest one i made was to move the couch from the living room to the bedroom. The table in the living room is going to be the next to get thrown out and being replaced with a smaller one instead... wink
wackelpeter
Well here's some more indepth info on my "Cabinets" this one being part 2 of my Timing/sequencing "brain" of my modular contains:
some logic (And,XOR/XNOR,OR,Inverter) from schematics of Ken Stone (CGS), two 4017 based 10 step counter/gate sequencer, a 4017 sequencer with various gate outs, one for each step and selectable by switches to get gates and pulses according to the steps and switch Settings, then there is the Jürgen Haible divide by-N where i brought ut the staircase which is only usefull in a few Settings, 4 gate to trigger, two 4013 based flip Flops, the CGS Sequential switch and a 2bit comparator which i build after the schematics from the Java application curcuit Simulator... total power is About 220mA so i'm Pretty safe with my 1A wallwart PSU... well most LED's are with limiting resistors of 12K so they end up between 1 and 2mA each in most cases and bright enough…





that'S the box at the Bottom, here we have:
a korg Resonator build after the schematics from Fonik/Matthias Hermann
-3 resonant LPG's
-a Buchla random voltage source after the schematics drawn by Scott Stites from EFM
-a smooth & stepped Generator (CGS/Serge)
-2 Buchla 258 Saw VCO's and 2 Square VCO's
-a Tiny mixer
-2 buchlaesque voltage processors (build after schematics from Fonik) in which the LED'S died the 2nd time, but the apart from the LED's the whole circuit still function (anybody had the same issue??)
-a yusynth VC Panner
-2 Buchla (Easel??) EG schematics by Aaron Lanternmann
-a Buchla Pulser schematics as above
-Electro notes random voltage and noise source
-Scott Bernardi Morph lag
-3 Ian Fritz analog XOR




the second from the Bottom:
2 Thomas Henry 4046 VCO
3 Buchla Vactrol X-Fader
1 Buchla Timbre Modulator
a mixer
Foniks VC Clock
2 Serge/CGS VCS
an 555 ad/AR by Thomas Henry
and the Polivoks VCF






the following one i have described already… will only contain some more Mixers, the scott Stites Vactrol LP VCF, Jürgen Haibles analog shift register, possibly another Phaser and a microphone pre-amp




and finally the one on top:

1x Scott Stites Quantizer
2x Foniks Quantizer
2 LPG
2 Buchla Envelope followers
CGS voltage processor
2 VCS
CGS CV Cluster
Buchla 291 BPF
CGS Comparator (2 channels only)
Buchla Integrator
Buchla Sample and Hold
Buchla Stored random voltages
and CGS/Serge Phaser (LED driving circuit replaced by Scott Stites LED Driver for his Multiphase and Vactrol VCF Projects)




the Little briefcase at the Bottom contains
4 ASM VCO's with Thomas Henry'S Expo converter and the FM Modulation as in the 258 VCO's (possibly my most favourite VCO'S even when syncing is a bit strange and i Maybe someday will lay my Hands on this again)
-yusynth saw animator
and 3 LFO's
-Scott Stites Vactrol bandpass VCF (my favourite Filter)
and serge wave Folder


the big box in the lower row of my shelf contains mostly dividers and such
run from 2 PSU's one for the logic and one for the analog
-a CGS master divider
-2 CGS pulse dividers
-2 CGS Burst Generators
-2 CGS Gate Sequencers
-a CGS VC divider
-2 slopes (DUSG)
-Wogglebug
-Morph lag
-Thomas Henry X-fader
-MFOS/Ray Wilson (R.I.P.) Noise cornupicciiiia (don#t remember exact the Name Right now)
-3 CGS switches 2 Input 1 out (or vice versa)
-1 CGS switch 4 Input 1 out (as above)
-2 Mixers
-some and and or
-a few gate to trigger
-2 MFOS VCA
-Timbre Modulator (buchla)
-CGS CV processor
-Buchla comb Filter
and finally Scott Bernardi VC Delay

will post some pics of the 4 bigger Brief cases Maybe soon and some description…
These msotyl contain Thomas Henry, Yusynth, CGS and Ian Fritz modules like Jerkster, delayed pulser, Yusynth Clock divder, Steiner VCF, EMS VCF, TH 555 VCO's, serge resonant Equalizer, TH VCA's , VCS VC panner, Serge VC ADSR, TH LFO Controller, TH 555 AD/AR, CGS Gated comparator, Ian Fritz 5 pulser and TGTSH, Yusynth wave Folder and quad LFO, serge 1973 VCF and 1973 envelope Generator and negative slew, EMS CVS ring mod, Psycho LFO, Moog ladder VCF, Roland System 100 or 700 VCF, along with more dividers, Morph lags, gate to trigger, Mixers and a couple of LFO's and 2 other ring mods (CGS real ring mod and a 1496 based one) craig andetons bass drum, CGS drum Simulator, few noise Sources, EFM S&H, slope detector, Roland ADSR, WASP VCF, CGS BPF, MS20 VCF, Reverb Belton so plenty of knobs to wiggle and hundreds of holes to stick cables into…
sometimes de-patching the whole Thing, making it totally naked, takes half an hour… this occurs mostly when i can'T find the knobs anymore under a big rats nest of patch cables… smile

well those won't win any beauty contests, and i don't take too much care (or rather Nothing at all) to the visuals but i'm quite happy with most of my builds of which whom have some flaws but the vast majority working as expected or at least to my full satisfaction.
J3RK
appliancide wrote:
Just finished these yesterday.




[/img]


Nice work!
J3RK
sduck wrote:
After some 8 months of toil, finally at a point where I can show this off. This isn't even for me, built it for a fellow wiggler. It's not completely done, there are a bunch of spots for mods on this panel, but I need to take a break from this, get some room to breath for a few moments. Currently it's at the state these were originally produced as - I got to work with a few of these back in the 70's, and this is really close to that experience.







I step away for a little bit, and something like this materializes. w00t
dhaillant




I love the MFOS Soundlab Mini Synth w00t
pirx
sduck wrote:
After some 8 months of toil, finally at a point where I can show this off. This isn't even for me, built it for a fellow wiggler. It's not completely done, there are a bunch of spots for mods on this panel, but I need to take a break from this, get some room to breath for a few moments. Currently it's at the state these were originally produced as - I got to work with a few of these back in the 70's, and this is really close to that experience.


That is a beautiful build, sduck. It remains me of Juergen's clones.
arthurdent
I built my first synth module over the weekend. It was a MTM Turing Machine MkII, bought the full kit from Thonk. What makes it special for me is it's the first ever electronics thing I've ever done in my entire life - and I'm 71 years old. Up until last week, the only soldering I had ever done is to fix a cord on an appliance, and that was 16 or 18 gauge wire and soldered with a big ol' Weller gun. To get ready for this, I picked up a circuit board and a handful of resistors at a local electronics place and spent several days last week practice soldering with a new Hakko FX-888D. I worked on the kit about 8-10 hours over the weekend - I was VERY ANAL about making sure I had the right parts the right way in the right place each time I did a component. And after every component, I used a 7X loupe to inspect the work before I went on to the next item. The module powered right up and worked the first time without having to go back in and re-do anything. So I feel pretty good. I've attached photos of the build; they're hi-rez pics so that you can look at my soldering and let me know how good or bad it really is - I'd apprectiate the feedback.
Peake
Congrats! w00t
synthetek
arthurdent wrote:
The module powered right up and worked the first time without having to go back in and re-do anything. So I feel pretty good. I've attached photos of the build; they're hi-rez pics so that you can look at my soldering and let me know how good or bad it really is - I'd apprectiate the feedback.


The solder side looks pretty good but it looks like its not fowing through to the component side very well in some spots. You may need a little more heat on your soldering iron or the joint might need to be heated up a little more before applying the solder. Cleaning the board on both sides first can help or on borads that are thicker or have big ground plane thats sucking up the heat I use some liquid flux or go over the holes on the component side with a flux pen. What type of solder did you use?



arthurdent
synthetek wrote:
arthurdent wrote:
The module powered right up and worked the first time without having to go back in and re-do anything. So I feel pretty good. I've attached photos of the build; they're hi-rez pics so that you can look at my soldering and let me know how good or bad it really is - I'd apprectiate the feedback.


The solder side looks pretty good but it looks like its not fowing through to the component side very well in some spots. You may need a little more heat on your soldering iron or the joint might need to be heated up a little more before applying the solder. Cleaning the board on both sides first can help or on borads that are thicker or have big ground plane thats sucking up the heat I use some liquid flux or go over the holes on the component side with a flux pen. What type of solder did you use?





The solder was MG Chemicals 60/40, 0.025" diameter with 2.2% RA flux. The MG tech data sheet for this lists a "Tip Temperature Upper Limit" of 500F; I tried this on my practice stuff but I could not get consistent joints so I started at 550. This worked OK initially but I had a couple of problem joints early on so I bumped the temp up to 600F for the rest of the project. For most of the work, I used a screwdriver-style tip that was 0.8mm wide. On the large pads for the IC sockets and a couple on the pots, I used a 1.2mm.

Thanks for the comments.
cygmu
arthurdent wrote:

The solder was MG Chemicals 60/40, 0.025" diameter with 2.2% RA flux. The MG tech data sheet for this lists a "Tip Temperature Upper Limit" of 500F.


I was really surprised by that but I checked and you are right! Wow, that is a very low temperature. When I got started someone told me to set my iron to 350C (660F) and forget about it. That seems to have worked fine for me. On Metcal irons, where the tip itself sets the temperature, the tips are available in 575F, 675F and 775F variants -- so 500F is unachievable. I think it seems crazy low.
Jay F.
Gret job. Very clean.

arthurdent wrote:
I was VERY ANAL about making sure I had the right parts the right way in the right place each time I did a component. And after every component, I used a 7X loupe to inspect the work before I went on to the next item.


And rightly so. This is how you manage to get builds working right the first time.

I would consider filling the holes for the jack for a stronger joint.

synhtetek is right. The solder has to ideally flow through the hole.
Regarding iron temperature, I'd consider 600°F to be a minimum. From my experience, 662 °F (350°C) is ideal for 60/40 type of solder. But it may vary with the flux.
arthurdent
cygmu wrote:
I was really surprised by that but I checked and you are right! Wow, that is a very low temperature. When I got started someone told me to set my iron to 350C (660F) and forget about it.

Jay F. wrote:
Regarding iron temperature, I'd consider 600°F to be a minimum. From my experience, 662 °F (350°C) is ideal for 60/40 type of solder. But it may vary with the flux.

I have seen the 350C temperature mentioned in a lot of places. But a few people also said to work with the lowest temperature that will do the job. Since the tech sheet listed a 500F (260C) top end for the solder, I was just trying to work as low as possible and still get the job done - AND, since this was my first build, I didn't want to fry any components.


Jay F. wrote:
I would consider filling the holes for the jack for a stronger joint.

synhtetek is right. The solder has to ideally flow through the hole.

OK, the module works fine as of now. I've had it powered up 3-4 times since it was built, probably has 10-12 hours on it (trying to "burn it in"). Should I still open it up and go through all of those joints to "top them off"?
Jay F.
arthurdent wrote:

OK, the module works fine as of now. I've had it powered up 3-4 times since it was built, probably has 10-12 hours on it (trying to "burn it in"). Should I still open it up and go through all of those joints to "top them off"?


If it was a life critical device, I would say yes. It is not. So : "if it ain't broke, don't fix it". There is no urgency to do it.
It's just that mechanical stress can more easily damage the joint. If they fail, it will be time to open and repair. There is a high chance that it won't be necessary.
Just think about it for the next build.
cygmu
arthurdent wrote:

I have seen the 350C temperature mentioned in a lot of places. But a few people also said to work with the lowest temperature that will do the job. Since the tech sheet listed a 500F (260C) top end for the solder, I was just trying to work as low as possible and still get the job done - AND, since this was my first build, I didn't want to fry any components.


I would definitely have done what you did, if I'd seen that on the data sheet. I'm just really surprised that they give such a low maximum. There must be a reason.

As for frying components, sometimes using too low a tip temperature can cause that to happen, because you end up needing to have the iron in contact with the part for too long.
synthetek
arthurdent wrote:
the module works fine as of now. I've had it powered up 3-4 times since it was built, probably has 10-12 hours on it (trying to "burn it in"). Should I still open it up and go through all of those joints to "top them off"?


I would leave it alone if it's working , but on the next one try to get it it to flow better. It looks a lot better than a lot of first builds I have seen and it's better than having too much solder everywhere and you did a good job of cleaning it up too. I usually keep my hakko at 675 - 700f I have never fried anything (just be be careful sensitive parts like polystyrene caps)
arthurdent
Jay F. wrote:
arthurdent wrote:

OK, the module works fine as of now. I've had it powered up 3-4 times since it was built, probably has 10-12 hours on it (trying to "burn it in"). Should I still open it up and go through all of those joints to "top them off"?

If it was a life critical device, I would say yes. It is not. So : "if it ain't broke, don't fix it". There is no urgency to do it.
It's just that mechanical stress can more easily damage the joint. If they fail, it will be time to open and repair. There is a high chance that it won't be necessary.
Just think about it for the next build.

Yeah, that's what I was thinking. It's in a studio case so it doesn't get dragged around to gigs, the only "stress" on it will be thermal - heat-up/cool-down whenever I use it. If I have a problem with it, I have an idea where to start looking.


Jay F. wrote:
Just think about it for the next build.

That's the scary part. When I first got into this about 2 years ago, I just wanted to make music, didn't really have any interest in building things. Now that I've done my first module, I'm looking at 4-5 others that I'd like to have, a couple of them even have some SMD. It's a disease, once you start, you can't stop!!!


cygmu wrote:
As for frying components, sometimes using too low a tip temperature can cause that to happen, because you end up needing to have the iron in contact with the part for too long.

Long story short - I'm retired now, I spent 42 years as a process/project/plant engineer, mostly in the chemical industries. I have degree in Chemical Engineering, spent a LOT of time studying/working with heat transfer, but with large tanks with "stuff" in them. I understand the concept of touching a hot iron to a circuit board with a wire through it that's attached to a component, with solder up against the wire and trying to heat the wire so that the solder melts and fuses the joint without detrimentally causing problems someplace else. But this is something that I have NEVER done before so, for lack of a better term, I was "apprehensive" about it all. The manufacturer of the solder says "don't heat it about 500F" so I have to think about that in context with the overall process, what I'm trying to accomplish. Like I said earlier, I have a tendency to be VERY ANAL.
dot matrix madness
Morph Controller (Doepfer A144 clone). Intended to enable switching between different formants
(emphasized frequency bands) depending on key velocity or other CVs.

MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Music Tech DIY  
Page 1 of 23
Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group