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WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

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Happy holidays! Please see the year-end funding drive post in the Announcements subforum. Thanks and all my love to you beautiful people.

Linux
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Music Software  
Author Linux
slumberjack
hi there!

i'm switching to linux and wonder who's working on this os too.

Hz,
s
adam
i run it on some pc's
beersbikesbuns
I used to use it as my primary and am thinking of going back. But I regularly use Linux through virtual machines
Koekepan
It's pretty much all I use.

These days it's quite a decent solution for audio, if you pick your software intelligently. If you're new to it, you probably want a fairly preconfigured system such as https://ubuntustudio.org/ but I just use straight Debian and go nuts.

Don't be afraid to ask questions. Someone here is likely to know the answers.
commodorejohn
I've been switched over for a couple years now (Devuan amd64) after it was clear Windows wasn't going to stop going to shit any time soon. Though I haven't used it for audio recording yet.
slumberjack
i will use it first on my daily business notebook to run reaper in wine for
audio chopping and stuff i don't need to be in the studio.

anybody runs usual daws? who's working with open stuff only?
Koekepan
I run renoise, sunvox, virtualANS as commercial software (although the last two are free downloads on desktop).

Free, I mostly run Audacity and Musescore (although I sometimes fiddle with other tools).

There are some excellent tools out there in freeland, if your mind is open. Not always as polished as, say, Cubase, but good stuff.
lamouette/rck
used to use it with bitwig, really nice combo, and easy to work with !
atte
I've been running linux since around 2000, debian stable since can't remember when. Main daw is reaper through wine, for tracking the modular.
slumberjack
i'm on ubuntu now with my notebook.
reaper tru wine.
it's more my daily operations workbox for my communication, office and business need. still some audio stuff i prefer to do on a notebook.

do all audio interfaces run with your systems?
scozbor
Ubuntu with Renoise and Bitwig here. loving it!!

Plugins in Wine can be a pain. About 70% of plugins I have tried are working for me using Airwave VST bridge.
slumberjack
scozbor wrote:
Ubuntu with Renoise and Bitwig here. loving it!!

Plugins in Wine can be a pain. About 70% of plugins I have tried are working for me using Airwave VST bridge.


Any idea with iZotope plug-ins?
JustGlyphs
I really want to use GNU for music but the lack of support for most plug-ins is what's holding me back. I think open source OS's are the future and wish it would happen faster, but I still only use GNU for watching videos and browsing the web. I couldn't use it for work or production stuff.

Getting audio configured can also be an enormous pain still. It's come a long way for casual users but in terms of creative software GNU's still pretty primitive.
slumberjack
a list of compatible audio intefaces would be nice.

those zoom recordes feature as plug and play devices in ubuntu easily
with audacity but no way to make them work via wine into reaper.

as my studio computer still is mapple i get along. portable i mainly do work like converting, cleaning and detail work - i can transfer the files from ubuntu to mac back and forth - so no real need for an audio interface.

since i'm saving for a mcmillen k-mix i maybe would like to record some wiggles during holidays somewhere portable with no an extra recording device.
snakejaw
I've used Linux on and off for many years, both as a general computing platform and for audio. I really respect the ethos and the fact that it's so customizable. You can pretty much build up a system with 0% cruft/crap, unlike OS X and Windows. But I feel that audio production in Linux is all over the place in terms of usability.

Really low audio latency is possible with Linux, so if you're recording vocal, guitars, hardware synths, etc., you can monitor your other tracks plus your outside input with software effects while playing, and everything sounds in sync. The RME Hammerfall cards are really well supported in Linux. Native programs work beautifully, as would be expected. The native Linux version of Renoise works great. There's the native DAW Ardour, developed under the heroic efforts of Paul Davis and others. There are great programs Routing in Jack is wonderful (it's available in OS X and Windows too). Bitwig looks cool and u-he have created Linux versions of their excellent VSTs. Dave Phillips is a great fount of knowledge concerning Linux and audio and I think he's on Muffs.

But I've spent a lot of frustrated hours trying to get Windows audio programs and VSTs to work in Wine with limited success. Often the GUIs don't render correctly, so you can't access the GUI to control settings, even if audio works. I believe that things have gotten better, but I've don't know for sure, since I've not been using Linux for audio for quite a while. One thing that hold me back from using Linux is that Ableton/Max doesn't work very well under Wine, if you can get it running at all. I really like Ableton ad have invested in the full suite and a Push 2, and I can't see leaving that behind. I REALLY, REALLY, REALLY wish Ableton would do a native Linux version of Live or at least look at making Live work well under Wine. If you're willing to just stick with what works out of the box and aren't tempted by things beyond that, I think Linux can be very usable. My problem is that I tend to fall down the "can I get it to work?" rabbit holes. But now that I've typed all this, I do think that I'm going try throwing Linux on the box and try warbling into my mic and whanging on my guitar, while monitoring everything in real time, drenched in software effects. Wish me luck! Looking forward to more of this conversation!
mutronic
I run Lubuntu on a lenovo laptop and use it for most of my music recording and programming on it. Super light-weight and very reliable.
existentia
I just switched to Anarchy (Arch with a friendlier install) and after about a week was up to speed with Ardour and Jack. The only downside is that every time I search for a solution to some problem, I find an answer that exactly matches what I need, except it's from 2003, so I have to do two more searches to match it to my setup. The best part is that VCV Rack no longer tries to set my graphics card on fire.
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