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WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

Haible PCB Experiences?
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Music Tech DIY  
Author Haible PCB Experiences?
southphillysynths
Just was looking over at random source's offerings for stand alone Haible PCBs

Anyone have any experience building these? Especially interested in the compact phasing A clone, chorus, and frequency shifter etc.

Should they be built as stand alone units or crammed into euro or maybe 5U?

Worth building?
oldenjon
I've heard great things about the frequency shifter, and also that it's a difficult build. I have a mind to build one this year. Keep in mind that most Haible circuits are designed for +/-15V. I seem to recall that some are suited to 12V operation, but I can't remember which ones.
southphillysynths
oldenjon wrote:
I've heard great things about the frequency shifter, and also that it's a difficult build. I have a mind to build one this year. Keep in mind that most Haible circuits are designed for +/-15V. I seem to recall that some are suited to 12V operation, but I can't remember which ones.


Right that's what I got out of the bit of reading I did. Doing them in 5U and making a small processing rig in a rack might be cool with some of these circuits...
nurbivore
I built the Euro Living VCOs, and found it extremely frustrating. Resistor lead holes were all just sliiightly too close together, and the pads seemed to actively repel solder, even after cleaning. The standalone PCBs look pretty similar, so it seemed worth mentioning.
fuzzbass
I did not build any of the Haible designs, but the serge euro Smooth and Stepped was a clean and straightforward build and the only problem I had was figuring out what it did once it was working.
oldenjon
nurbivore wrote:
I built the Euro Living VCOs, and found it extremely frustrating. Resistor lead holes were all just sliiightly too close together, and the pads seemed to actively repel solder, even after cleaning. The standalone PCBs look pretty similar, so it seemed worth mentioning.


That's a problem with the R*S PCBs in general, some of the JH boards are NOS. There are TH resistors that are slightly shorter than others, and some that are miniature. It's advised to source these components carefully for R*S builds. The pads that seem to repel solder are probably those connected to the ground plane which act like a heat sink. It would help if these pads were just a bit larger for better thermal contact, but you can use a flux pen to apply flux to the lead and pad for better results.
sduck
I've built a bunch of JH stuff with pcbs direct from him, and also the living vcos from r*s. The original stuff is great stuff, easy to build as long as you can get all the parts and figure out the wiring. Everything I built from his pcbs worked perfect at first power up. The r*s living vcos were a bit more troublesome - had to do a bit of debugging, but it works well once everything was straightened out.

The FS1a boards I think are the originals from JH, leftover from his original stash. I bought one set and it's identical to what I got originally. This will be the hardest build of any JH stuff, barring the vocoder I think.

FWIW I never had any problems soldering any of this, either the new or the old, but I'm pretty experienced at soldering and know how to deal with ornery boards.
southphillysynths
sduck wrote:
I've built a bunch of JH stuff with pcbs direct from him, and also the living vcos from r*s. The original stuff is great stuff, easy to build as long as you can get all the parts and figure out the wiring. Everything I built from his pcbs worked perfect at first power up. The r*s living vcos were a bit more troublesome - had to do a bit of debugging, but it works well once everything was straightened out.

The FS1a boards I think are the originals from JH, leftover from his original stash. I bought one set and it's identical to what I got originally. This will be the hardest build of any JH stuff, barring the vocoder I think.

FWIW I never had any problems soldering any of this, either the new or the old, but I'm pretty experienced at soldering and know how to deal with ornery boards.


thank you all for the input!

Was just watching some of your videos sduck, wonderful stuff as always. The FS1a sounds great just not sure if I'm up to building it, the e560 seems to hold up pretty well next to it hihi
the bad producer
If building the old boards, then so long as you put the right component in the right place nothing is that difficult IMO, quite straightforward in a way, unlike many many recent projects that require fixes or mods to get working properly, or don't have decent BOMs or schematics, or have cheap PCBs (JHs PCBs were very good quality) or lack support - the JH forum over on e-m has many years worth of build tips...
notmiserlouagain
sduck wrote:
This will be the hardest build of any JH stuff, barring the vocoder I think.


Just out of curiosity, what do you mean by "hard" (in terms of populating and soldering a PCB)?
sduck
Well, it's just a bunch of parts, right? What made it hard for me was the parts matching part, and not really having the right meter for the job, and having to get reassurances from JH that just using the stock values for the parts I couldn't read was no problem. That just added a few extra days onto the process. And the wiring diagram was a work in progress sort of thing - took some schematic diving to sort out what was what. And there was some debugging, sort of, as the wiring diagram wasn't quite right at the time anyway - so it's quite likely that won't be so much of a problem now.

JH FS1a side1 by Stephen Drake, on Flickr

JH FS1a side2 by Stephen Drake, on Flickr
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
I don't have any experience with JH PCBs, but I have spent several hours trying to decipher the JH frequency shifter schematic, ultimately to no avail. If someone who worked for me drew a schematic like that, they'd be fired. That schematic is a crime against humanity.
LED-man
i built many devices with original J.Haible pcbs, the original PCBs are good.
the Skill and DIY Level is definitiv a 10 (very complex).
I built few devices as Standalone, MOTM, MU.

i built few Random Source Versions too, the soldering was more complicated,
7mm instead of 10-11mm resistor footprint.
normally i doesn´t have a problem with small ENIG Solderpads, but on this pcbs was many soldering failures..
i discussed it with RS without a solution.
Maybe it was a fabrication failure with the ENIG pads.

ENIG problems:
http://qualitel.com/enig-problems-enig-premium-solves/
bsilverberg
I've built the Frequency Shifter 1a and the Living Vocoder. Like Sduck said, upon powering up the first time, they worked! There's no particularly special challenge to these boards as long as you go slow, pay attention, and do some research. That's true in any build. The FS1a sounds spectacular as do the other JH builds I've seen, and feel they are worth the extra bit of effort.


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djs
I have an old FS1-A board set that's been sitting in my build pile for about 6 years. Mostly I'm afraid of the dome filter resistor selection- I'll probably get that done at some point, because obviously the PCB isn't really doing me any good half built. On the plus side, the instructions from Jurgen are about as good as you can get for something like this.

The end point is to build a sort of serge klangzeit m-odule with this and a digital delay. Probably folly, but maybe it'll work!
Revok
sduck wrote:
Well, it's just a bunch of parts, right? What made it hard for me was the parts matching part, and not really having the right meter for the job, and having to get reassurances from JH that just using the stock values for the parts I couldn't read was no problem.


I'm in the middle of this right now actually. hihi

I'm thinking about just buying 1% C0G caps and using the stock resistor values since I can't seem to source 1% PS caps at a reasonable price or size. The price on the .1uF 1% C0G isn't looking so hot right now though.

edit:
The other option I've come up with is getting this kit for a cap meter:

http://www.rhelectronics.net/store/high-resolution-capacitor-meter-diy -pro.html

It's based on Roman Black's design which he claims is +/-0.2% or better if calibrated further.

https://www.romanblack.com/onesec/CapMeter.htm
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