MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index
 FAQ & Terms of UseFAQ & Terms Of Use   Wiggler RadioMW Radio   Muff Wiggler TwitterTwitter   Support the site @ PatreonPatreon 
 SearchSearch   RegisterSign up   Log inLog in 
WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

Starting up a Buchla system.
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Buchla, EMS & Serge  
Author Starting up a Buchla system.
kroe
Hello Guys, ( please excuse a Buchla virgin here )

I already have some 3U, some 4U, some standalone Ciat-Lonbarde, some Folktek stuff and a Cirklon and now I feel like it's time for a Buchla.

It's been a long time I'm into buying a Buchla but I never really managed to save for it, after a few years I think I'm finally on the 'range' and I'm looking into starting a "medium to large" system.


I have seen some "Music easel" performances live and they sound cool but I have the impression it sounds very "the same" every time I see one ( forgive me for saying that!! ), so I would probably not start on that there - unless there is a good reason for it that I don't know!

I really love 99% ( who Am I lying too, I love them all ) of the Buchla demos and sounds which makes me very confident that "this just can't go wrong".


The devil on my shoulder tells me to go directly into something like a "System #3" or "System #4" described on http://www.synthtopia.com/content/2009/10/26/buchla-200e-analog-synthe sizer/

But I saw loads of comments saying there are more modern setups that would yield more radical results.

If I were your best friend and you really loved me from the bottom of our heart and you knew I was ready to invest 15-25K in it, what would you recommend me?

ps: I don't mind having some "Clones"!

Thank YOU!

w00t
rkilman
I'd recommend getting an 18 space cabinet and the modules that come in the 12 space system to expand and try out different modules - you may find you want four complex oscillators and two sets of 281e/292e for example. When I fist started with Buchla, I had no interest in presets or midi, but both are really awesome features and a big part of what sets 200e apart, so I have mostly stayed away from clones, but that's a personal preference.
mirf59
...

First, figure out what you want the instrument to do, need it to do. Important questions are:

1. Do you need to be able to store module settings and recall them? If yes, you'll need "e" modules and a preset manager. If no, you can get by with much cheaper clone modules (but they sound different).

2. Do you want your instrument to be able to communicate with external devices? If yes, you still have two options: (1) 206e and the USB interface card to shoot MIDI into the 200e music box (4 channels on the internal busses), or (2) 225e (4 channels internal busses, 4 channels external busses, and 12 assignable CVs for external MIDI control).

3. Do you want to be able to interact with the instrument using Don's unique control surface for the 200e music box, the "thunder" or 223e/222e Kinesthetic tactile input port?

4. What other preferences do you have? CV control versus filtering versus randomness versus exotic signal inputs (radio & pre-amp ins). Analog v digital wave generators.

5. How much on-board sequencing do you want, and how much do you want to be able to manipulate the sequencers in real time during performance? Maybe this also has to do with the amount of rhythm you want to make versus harmony/melody or experimental noises.

There really is no "one-size-fits-all."

The good news is you can't go wrong if you buy used on this forum and build slow. All the modules are inspiring. If you acquire a piece that doesn't fit in as expected, swap it here at the forum for something else.

I would recommend against buying a lump system. I suspect it will be overwhelming and might make it harder to isolate what you can do with each module.

A final note, I think you need at least 14U or so to have a complete instrument. Since there is no off-the-shelf 14U case, I would recommend you start with an empty big-ass 18U cabinet, then get the tried-and-true starter system (assuming you want to go "e"):
(1) 206e; or, 225e & 207e; or, 227e & 225e (jumbo option)
(2) 261e or 259e (or one of each)
(3) 281e,
(4) 292e, and
(5) 266e (plus 291e if you want), or 267e.

From there, add a module here, module there and see what happens.

Good luck.

Brian

...
Oxix52
mirf59 wrote:
...

I would recommend against buying a lump system. I suspect it will be overwhelming and might make it harder to isolate what you can do with each module.

...


I wholeheartedly agree with this. Get 1, 2, or just a few modules and do as much as you can with those before adding more. Every module is surprisingly deep. If you jump in to a large system to start with, you may never experience some of the more subtle nuances of the modules.
Default1
mirf59 wrote:
...

A final note, I think you need at least 14U or so to have a complete instrument. Since there is no off-the-shelf 14U case, I would recommend you start with an empty big-ass 18U cabinet, then get the tried-and-true starter system (assuming you want to go "e"):
(1) 206e; or, 225e & 207e; or, 227e & 225e (jumbo option)
(2) 261e or 259e (or one of each)
(3) 281e,
(4) 292e, and
(5) 266e (plus 291e if you want), or 267e.

From there, add a module here, module there and see what happens.

Good luck.

Brian

...


Couldn't agree more. As someone who has just bought into 200e in the last few months, and 5 panels in (waiting on a 6th hyper ), the system outlined by Mirf is exactly what I am shooting for.

I would personally get a 6 panel system and then work it out from there:
- 225e midi decoder and preset manager. The midi decoder is an absolutely beautiful module because of the vast number of outs and, as with all buchla modules, the depth of function. Even without any hardware sequencer, just using midi in from the computer, you can make really complex percussion patches, using multiple channels of midi to control wave-shapes via the 281e.
- 261e and 259e complex and twisted waveform generators. Remember that you get four voices of polyphony already with two oscillators, and even when you are using the modulation oscillator as a voice, you can still use it to modulate the principal oscillator.
- 281e and 292e: these are a sina qua non
- One of the mixers.

After that, you will have a really good idea of what you will next want:
- Do you want more hardware sequencers?
- Do you want more voltage control?
- Do you want more sound processing?
- Do you want to add onboard effects?

The other thing I found very useful in the beginning is buying Todd Barton's videos on MacProVideo. Compared to the amount you will spend on your synth, its a tiny amount to spend.
cyberdine
+1 for Todd Barton's videos. All of them (and there are a lot!) are worth watching. I learned an enormous amount from them.

My 2c - I would definitely go for a 259e. But I don't love the 261e, and would suggest a clone 258 might be a better way to go.

Definitely start small and build from there.
tIB
Default1 wrote:
mirf59 wrote:
...

A final note, I think you need at least 14U or so to have a complete instrument. Since there is no off-the-shelf 14U case, I would recommend you start with an empty big-ass 18U cabinet, then get the tried-and-true starter system (assuming you want to go "e"):
(1) 206e; or, 225e & 207e; or, 227e & 225e (jumbo option)
(2) 261e or 259e (or one of each)
(3) 281e,
(4) 292e, and
(5) 266e (plus 291e if you want), or 267e.

From there, add a module here, module there and see what happens.

Good luck.

Brian

...


Couldn't agree more. As someone who has just bought into 200e in the last few months, and 5 panels in (waiting on a 6th hyper ), the system outlined by Mirf is exactly what I am shooting for.

I would personally get a 6 panel system and then work it out from there:
- 225e midi decoder and preset manager. The midi decoder is an absolutely beautiful module because of the vast number of outs and, as with all buchla modules, the depth of function. Even without any hardware sequencer, just using midi in from the computer, you can make really complex percussion patches, using multiple channels of midi to control wave-shapes via the 281e.
- 261e and 259e complex and twisted waveform generators. Remember that you get four voices of polyphony already with two oscillators, and even when you are using the modulation oscillator as a voice, you can still use it to modulate the principal oscillator.
- 281e and 292e: these are a sina qua non
- One of the mixers.

After that, you will have a really good idea of what you will next want:
- Do you want more hardware sequencers?
- Do you want more voltage control?
- Do you want more sound processing?
- Do you want to add onboard effects?

The other thing I found very useful in the beginning is buying Todd Barton's videos on MacProVideo. Compared to the amount you will spend on your synth, its a tiny amount to spend.


I pretty much did this - didn't bother with a mixer in my six space that I had for a couple of years: 225, 259, 266, 291, 281 and 292. A few years on I'm at 18 and may look towards another row in the future - powered six is as good a place to start as any IMHO.
Precarious
Just getting into Buchla myself and I highly recommend a similar path to my own, which is to start small. That gives the opportunity to truly explore each module to get an accurate feel for the Buchla world. Regardless of understanding the basics of what each module represents there is an underlying logic I find quite different from other formats. For instance, the separation of CV and audio signals, and general lack of attenuation, force you to think differently about a patch. I've also found starting small forced me to push each module to the limits of its capabilities which is a whole lot of fun!

Once you get your feet wet you'll have a better idea of what you want next and how best to expand your system for maximum enjoyment.

There is a link in my signature to videos of my experiments with only 2U as example of just how much fun you can have with very few modules.

Happy noodling!
memes_33
i started with a set of 259, 281, and 292 clones. i got them for a good price for the set as the 281 & 259 had some issues that i've since addressed. it was a great place to start- it allowed me to spend time with those core modules (especially the 259 sounds). next i would add a 266 for some randomness.

the presets vs. no presets thing is probably something you should iron out early on.
Peake
There's a thread near the top of this forum showing how much can be done with just a couple of the right modules; I agree with others, start small and get to know the Buchla mindset as it's different from other systems. Definitely watch Todd Barton's videos, etc.

https://www.muffwiggler.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=194509
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Buchla, EMS & Serge  
Page 1 of 1
Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group