MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index
 FAQ & Terms of UseFAQ & Terms Of Use   Wiggler RadioMW Radio   Muff Wiggler TwitterTwitter   Support the site @ PatreonPatreon 
 SearchSearch   RegisterSign up   Log inLog in 
WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

3D printer - Front Panel nut keys.
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Music Tech DIY Goto page 1, 2  Next [all]
Author 3D printer - Front Panel nut keys.
BillLynes


I have designed a set of nut keys for 3D printing.

The designs are available here..

https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2819871
Synth Con Meo
That's a pretty good idea. For some reason it didn't ever dawn on me to model up some of these and build them a long time ago. I'll have to print some of these up at work on our SLA machine.

Thanks for the design.
BillLynes
Synth Con Meo wrote:
That's a pretty good idea. For some reason it didn't ever dawn on me to model up some of these and build them a long time ago. I'll have to print some of these up at work on our SLA machine.

Thanks for the design.


No problemo.

Might need a few on the knurled nut drivers. I don't think the little nubs will last long.
mOBiTh
Any recommendations on where to get the printed in the uk please?
Rex Coil 7
You've created a well done solution to a very common problem.

I've been using cardboard for ages. Your solution is far more eloquent.



How durable is the 3D plastic stuff? Will the hex wear out over time (begin rounding out, etc..)?
erstlaub
The thing I find pretty depressing about the rise of 3d printing is that it must be fairly increasing the amount of waste plastic produced that we're ruining the environment with.

I know it's possible to thresh and reconstitute PLA so it can be turned back into more but very few of the places I've experienced bother with that so it's basically just making more landfill.

I tend to just wrap my tool in tape to avoid panel scratches (more plastic waste I guess but not nearly as energy or volume intensive).
MrsWedge
Have you tried polishing the ends of yer nut drivers?
I would think that polishing them to a fine polish with a jeweler's mop would do the trick?
Rex Coil 7
erstlaub wrote:
.... I tend to just wrap my tool in tape to avoid panel scratches (more plastic waste I guess but not nearly as energy or volume intensive).
Using cardboard gets around those issues. I've been using the very same cardboard protectors that I made myself with a pair of scissors for over 500 builds. No electricity to make them was used, no polys/plastics used in their creation, and only a very small bit of paper waste. Very "planet friendly".

seriously, i just don't get it
Rex Coil 7
MrsWedge wrote:
Have you tried polishing the ends of yer nut drivers?
I would think that polishing them to a fine polish with a jeweler's mop would do the trick?
Nope. The tool is still harder than the panel, which will scratch the panel no matter how smooth you make the tool. Besides, your nut drivers are chrome plated, so as you polish the chrome plating there's a excellent chance you'll actually buff right through the chrome plating and hit raw tool steel. This will leave edges.

Plastic tools engineered and designed for this precise purpose (materials included) would be your only hope against scratching the panels without using existing tools to begin with.

Once again, I'm going to throw the ~cardboard protector trick~ out there. Cheap, easy to make, less harmful to the planet, easily replaceable, and produce a scratchless finish.

(see pics a few posts above). cool
mOBiTh
I've been using polished cromoly hex drivers for hex nuts, no scratches. no good for the knurled nuts tho...
Rex Coil 7
mOBiTh wrote:
I've been using polished cromoly hex drivers for hex nuts, no scratches. no good for the knurled nuts tho...
I can apply plenty of torque to the nuts using cardboard. Polished tooling does not permit the use of enough downward pressure to produce the torque I prefer to apply. I also use Blue Loctite on the threads ... just a pin's head drop is all it takes. Blue Loctite is also removable, it doesn't make a "permanent" chemical lock on the threads. If it's a little too well locked on, use of a little heat applied to the area softens the Loctite up for removal.

I'v probably used every idea there is to avoid scratching panels while still being able to apply a really solid amount of torque to the fastener. Cardboard works best, at least for me it has. Been doing repairs and building new since 1994. One thousand invoices per year for nearly 20 years. Everything from raw aluminum surfaces to freshly painted steel. Factory finish remains in tact.

In any case .... Be sure WHAT EVER you use is clean and free of little bits of ~whatever~ ...

For knurled nuts, I use electrical "wire nut" ... plastic ones .. find one that suits the nut, press down on it nice and hard so the plastic wire nut grabs hold of the knurls on the knurled nut .... done.

thumbs up
Joe.
A hollow shaft nut driver is a couple of dollars.

If you need to wrap tools, (paper) medical tape works really well.
BillLynes
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
You've created a well done solution to a very common problem.

I've been using cardboard for ages. Your solution is far more eloquent.


How durable is the 3D plastic stuff? Will the hex wear out over time (begin rounding out, etc..)?


I think the hex drivers will last for a while. The knurled nut driver might not last as long though.
BillLynes
erstlaub wrote:
The thing I find pretty depressing about the rise of 3d printing is that it must be fairly increasing the amount of waste plastic produced that we're ruining the environment with.

I know it's possible to thresh and reconstitute PLA so it can be turned back into more but very few of the places I've experienced bother with that so it's basically just making more landfill.

I tend to just wrap my tool in tape to avoid panel scratches (more plastic waste I guess but not nearly as energy or volume intensive).


A valid point. However, I would guess that the amount of waste plastic produced from 3D printing is trivial compared to plastic water/soda bottles.
erstlaub
For sure it's trivial compared to other plastic waste but it is still an addition. In my fairly limited experience with a 3d printer we had for a while at work, there was a huge amount of waste and fails printed while trying to set up and calibrate prints which just got chucked away. We made a few tools and some replacement glasses hinges but they all ultimately just broke/wore out and got thrown away too.

I think there's something of an easy come/easy go attitude towards this stuff too (I'm not aiming that at you btw), it's so magical to be able to churn out a *thing* (and I've totally experienced that magic briefly) that that didn't exist before, I'm not sure that a lot of people think consciensciously about it and there's an inbuilt attitude that comes with it of "i can just print myself another one".

I looked briefly into getting a plastic recycler for making things into/back into PLA but it looked like a huge amount of work and hassle for the end result and the people's time and budget just wouldn't support it.

It's well worth looking into though as I figure if you can afford the few grand outlay and the time it could eventually save a bit of money and the environment (not that we've not already pretty much fucked it anyway).
mskala
When it comes to plastic waste from electronics manufacturing, I'd be a lot more concerned by the bags that components come in. I try to re-use them wherever possible, but I still have a lot more bags coming in than go out, and the difference (which mostly consists of unlabelled and mixed resins that aren't routinely taken for recycling) ends up in the garbage. It doesn't take very many bags to outweigh a few small 3D-printed hex wrenches.
captnapalm
This is a great idea. If somebody wants to print a couple extra sets and sell them I'd happily pay.
Synth Con Meo
I hear you about the waste aspect especially in general terms. I don't want to go off to much of a tangent here but I just thought I would give a little of my own thoughts on waste. Modern society seems to thrive on waste. All these plastic bags and shrink wrapped containers drive me nuts. Then some of that is shipped on boxes with non recyclable or biofriendly Styrofoam peanuts. And for some of this stuff the packaging is worth more than the contents. Paper and cardboard is bad enough and can be argued about whether or not it's financially or even environmentally friendly recyclable. The only plus side (for a lack of better terms) is that generally paper products will decompose over time.

I've seen years ago that there was an effort to invent biodegradable plastics which at least should be in the right direction. But I haven't seen any real headway on this.

As far as RP/3D printing, I am an RP Engineer at a large investment casting company. My job is to prepare CAD models to be built on our Stereolithography machines for patterns that take place of our regular wax patterns. The patterns are not solid but have a honeycomb structure on the inside to allow it to be investment casting friendly. So the patterns do get drained mostly back into the vat in the machine. But any residual resin gets spun out in our extractor then cured into a big chunk of plastic and thrown out. We don't really recycle the drained resin that is spun out due to it being somewhat contaminated and we don't want to reintroduce that into our vats.

This shit is expensive too. About $1500 for a 10 KG jug of it. The patterns themselves after being invested gets flash fired and burn up in which we have air scrubbers for that.
BillLynes
Several people accross different forums/FB groups have asked about printing these for themselves or others.

Please help yourself. This started of as a design project for myself. The 3D printer I have at the University of Washington has been out of action for a couple of years. I just got around to replacing the extruder head. I wanted to test the printer and learn what design software was out there etc. I just threw these designs together in a couple of hours for fun.

I have found that the hex drivers are good but the knurled nut driver needs some work. The small nubs that fit in the nut slots wear down/break too easily. I might revisit the design and try to make something that fits into the knurled indentations around the nut circumference.

Cheers

Bill
Synth Con Meo
BillLynes wrote:

I have found that the hex drivers are good but the knurled nut driver needs some work. The small nubs that fit in the nut slots wear down/break too easily. I might revisit the design and try to make something that fits into the knurled indentations around the nut circumference.

Cheers

Bill

That might not be a bad idea, and keep the pins too, they should last longer with not having to take the whole torque of the nut. I've used thin needle nose plyers to tighten them but it's a bit precarious to do. It's easy to slip out and damage the panel.
BillLynes
Synth Con Meo wrote:
BillLynes wrote:

I have found that the hex drivers are good but the knurled nut driver needs some work. The small nubs that fit in the nut slots wear down/break too easily. I might revisit the design and try to make something that fits into the knurled indentations around the nut circumference.

Cheers

Bill

That might not be a bad idea, and keep the pins too, they should last longer with not having to take the whole torque of the nut. I've used thin needle nose plyers to tighten them but it's a bit precarious to do. It's easy to slip out and damage the panel.


I used mine yesterday to tighten a dozen or so knurled nuts. It worked OK as long as I concentrated and made sure the tool was seated square on the nut. But once it started to go it went quickly.

Ive seen a few commercial products with embedded metal pins. I don't think that is possible to recreate with my basic 3D printer.
BillLynes


You can see in this photograph how the pins have worn.
Synth Con Meo
The only thing I can think of off hand is to design it like you mentioned with grabbing the knurled area but maybe having some holes (or maybe some indentations to mark where to drill (since printing holes wouldn't work so well) that one could maybe insert some sort of hard wire pin. Maybe cut off nail or something that would grasp the slots. I know not the most elegant and kind of a PITA but just a thought.
BillLynes
Synth Con Meo wrote:
The only thing I can think of off hand is to design it like you mentioned with grabbing the knurled area but maybe having some holes (or maybe some indentations to mark where to drill (since printing holes wouldn't work so well) that one could maybe insert some sort of hard wire pin. Maybe cut off nail or something that would grasp the slots. I know not the most elegant and kind of a PITA but just a thought.


I like the idea of drilling holes and inserting metal pins.
whoop_john
erstlaub wrote:
The thing I find pretty depressing about the rise of 3d printing is that it must be fairly increasing the amount of waste plastic produced that we're ruining the environment with.


Well don't be depressed, because many people, myself included, print using polylactic acid.

Polylactic acid is a biodegradable and bioactive thermoplastic derived from renewable resources, such as corn starch, cassava roots, chips or starch, or sugarcane.
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Music Tech DIY Goto page 1, 2  Next [all]
Page 1 of 2
Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group