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Speaker Eq guide.
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Music Tech DIY  
Author Speaker Eq guide.
zoogoo
I built a custom omni top PA and the speakers are not equalized. I have a 32 band Eq I need to Eq each speaker and optimize for best output performance. Is there a good guide how to use sound generator, REal time anaylslzer, and reference microphone to set the equalization correctly? Thanks
Don T
zoogoo wrote:
I built a custom omni top PA and the speakers are not equalized. I have a 32 band Eq I need to Eq each speaker and optimize for best output performance. Is there a good guide how to use sound generator, REal time anaylslzer, and reference microphone to set the equalization correctly? Thanks


I don't know about a specific guide you're looking for, but having a data sheet for the specific speaker you're using would be helpful. You'll want to know the roll-off point of each driver, and how well that driver responds beyond the roll-off point. Some drivers suffer from "cone breakup" past their recommended crossover point, so if you boost that range, you'll be boosting distortion. Are these single-driver speakers, or two way? Do they have an internal crossover or no?
dubonaire
This is not what you are asking for but it's where you should start.

http://www.neumann-kh-line.com/klein-hummel/globals.nsf/resources/Neum ann_Setting_up_Studio_Monitors_08_2014.pdf/$File/Neumann_Setting_up_St udio_Monitors_08_2014.pdf

The idea is to minimize electronic equalization by setting up the room properly first.

Just search for it in youtube and you will find a bunch of videos that get you there.
zoogoo
no that isnt what i was looking for. I need to figure out how to play a pink noise and flatline the RTA with a mic. Its very tricky, i need to know what factors and steps i should take. Studio monitors have built in eq because they are modified dsp/analog eq from builder. this is just wood, speakers, crossovers, wires. needs color.
memes_33
https://www.roomeqwizard.com/
ashleym
There will be some thinking about a room that worked for a direct sound speaker going to an omni. Off axis sound and how that varies is key in a direct speaker. With an omni it should be the same all round. This means positioning the speaker to deal with all the rear and side generated energy plus up to the ceiling and down to the floor sound that first appears in a different position to regular speakers.

I agree with others. Get the room right and tweak with a bit of eq if you really have to. I keep the signal chain as simple as possible. I listen in nearfield at work and in the home studio. My main hifi speakers have additional upwards firing mid and tops. I’m not a stereo image nut so I don’t mind the extra diffused sound. No eq used at home and just the bass loading for the speakers at work.
doubtfulsalmon
zoogoo wrote:
I built a custom omni top PA and the speakers are not equalized.


Am I understanding your situation correctly in that you are looking to obtain as flat frequency response possible from the PA you've built, rather than the best listening response in a specific room? The latter is much easier, and I'd recommend following everybody else's advice/links on this if you only intend to use the PA in a single space.

zoogoo wrote:
I need to figure out how to play a pink noise and flatline the RTA with a mic. Its very tricky, i need to know what factors and steps i should take.


Does your speaker have multiple drivers to obtain omnidirectionality? if so it's probably best to start one speaker at a time, otherwise there are too many factors to consider. The main thing to account for is the space-dependent frequency response of the room you're testing in, in reality this means spacial averaging - record with your mic in as many different positions as possible, without getting within ~1m of the floor/ceilings/walls, take an average of the measurements and look at the frequency response. That gives your basis for what you need to adjust on the eq (if you can get the FRF displayed in the same 32 bands as the eq this will be easier) but you will need to kind of guess exact values. Then repeat the measurement process.

This is not a precise method, as you cant completely counteract the room response, and relies on the assumption that you aren't bothered about the direct field from the speaker, but should be a start. I have no experience of what you can/cant do with commercial RTA software, I've only ever processed the data from this kinda thing with my own code (pretty simple in python/matlab). Pro-companies do this analysis in anechoic chambers, which avoid the need for spacial averaging down to a low-frequency limit, there's only so much you can do without one and it may just be best to rely on your ears after a point.

zoogoo wrote:
Studio monitors have built in eq because they are modified dsp/analog eq from builder. this is just wood, speakers, crossovers, wires. needs color.

Not necessarily. A huge amount of R&D, simulation,and testing goes into cabinet design to get the response right, there is a lot of interplay between each element of the system. You may find it easier to redesign you cabinet from scratch rather than drastically eq, which has its own problems
dubonaire
zoogoo wrote:
no that isnt what i was looking for. I need to figure out how to play a pink noise and flatline the RTA with a mic. Its very tricky, i need to know what factors and steps i should take. Studio monitors have built in eq because they are modified dsp/analog eq from builder. this is just wood, speakers, crossovers, wires. needs color.


It's not tricky at all. There is an abundance of youtube videos as I suggested. Playing pink noise and sine waves and using the equalizer (a last resort) to get closer to a flat line is not tricky.
davemoog
As mentioned above Free - Room EQ Wizard. You'll need a computer, reference or pretty flat condenser mike. Some positioning of speakers required + speaker crossover levels and perhaps an EQ.
The Grump
Read this.

https://www.amazon.com/Sound-Reinforcement-Handbook-Gary-Davis/dp/0881 889008/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1523477333&sr=8-1&keywords=yamaha+sound+ reinforcement+handbook
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