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AC fuses?
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Music Tech DIY  
Author AC fuses?
devinw1
So, I've got my panel mount fuse holder (the little round guys that hold 1/4" x 1.25" round fuses), but I'm having a heck of a time finding a fuse on Mouser.... I search and find only specialty fuses that are not in stock and like $15.... I must be doing something wrong. Can anyone link me to a part please?

I need a 120 VAC 1/8 Slo-blo.

Muchos gracias!
Rex Coil 7
devinw1 wrote:
So, I've got my panel mount fuse holder (the little round guys that hold 1/4" x 1.25" round fuses), but I'm having a heck of a time finding a fuse on Mouser.... I search and find only specialty fuses that are not in stock and like $15.... I must be doing something wrong. Can anyone link me to a part please?

I need a 120 VAC 1/8 Slo-blo.

Muchos gracias!
You don't have to use ~just~ a 120v fuse, in fact you will be better off using a 240v fuse.

Those types of fuses are rated by voltage which determines how large of an air gap is created when the element burns open. The higher the voltage rating, the wider the air gap is when the fuse element burns open. This is done to make sure that the voltage cannot jump the gap created by the burned open element. Higher voltages require more of an air gap to prevent that voltage from jumping the gap after the fuse blows, which would keep the current flowing when it should not be.

So what does this mean? It means that you may open up your search criteria to include voltage ratings above 120v ... which will increase your chances of locating the specified current rating (1/8 amp). It is perfectly safe to use a HIGHER voltage rating (in fact I prefer it) then that which is specified ... as long as the CURRENT rating is as spec'd.

So open up your search specs to 120v and above. You may discover it's easier to locate what you need that way.

Look in electrical supply houses (as opposed to electronic supply vendors).

LINK = https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_trksid=m570.l1313&_nkw=1%2F 8+amp+slo+blo+fuse&_sacat=0

BACKGROUND: I owned and operated an industrial power equipment repair center for fifteen years, with eighteen employees. We had "factory authorized" repair and warranty contracts as an authorized repair center with over forty different manufacturers, such as Black and Decker, Makita, DeWalt, Milwaukee, Miller Electric (welders), Lincoln Electric (welders), Onan Generator, Generac Generator, Coleman, Honda, and many many others. We held service contracts with hospitals, police departments, fire departments, high schools, colleges and universities, casinos, the local international airport, and hundreds of other customers that required reliable and trustworthy service and maintenance of their emergency generators, the largest of which were 1 Megawatt (as large as an average sized house). I used high-voltage fuses in every one of these customers' emergency power generators, as well as thousands of RV generators.

I stocked nothing but 240v fuses, which were used in applications as low as 12v, 24v, 32v. Yes, a 240v fuse works just fine in a 32v device. As long as the AMPERAGE (aka Current) rating is proper.

thumbs up
Synthiq
Mouser # 530-3SB125-R might be what you are looking for.
Rex Coil 7
Also, use a CERAMIC fuse ... the white colored ones. The ceramic type support the element far better so the element won't just ~break~ due to the device taking an impact (like if it were to be dropped). Glass fuses (those are the ones you can see through) do not provide any support for the element and allow it to become broken if some type of mechanical shock occurs. The only reason glass fuses exist is so you can see if the element is intact. But you should never (ever!) use visual verification for checking if a fuse has blown. You should ALWAYS use a meter to check a fuse. That said, use of a glass fuse is not required, so just use ceramic fuses since you should always be using a meter to verify whether the fuse is open or intact. Ceramic fuses are FAR FAR more durable, and way less likely for the element to become broken.
devinw1
Thanks ya'll! I knew I could count on the wigglers!!
devinw1
6mm x 32mm.... That was helpful. Of course that's roughly the same as a 1/4" x 1.25" fuse.

Sometimes the search modifiers on Mouser are overwhelming and make it a little tricky to find what ya need.
Rex Coil 7
devinw1 wrote:
Thanks ya'll! I knew I could count on the wigglers!!
My work here is complete. Unsubbed. cool
fuzzbass
Mouser has a good selection of 20mm x 5mm fuses from Schurter.

https://www.mouser.com/Schurter/Circuit-Protection/Fuses/_/N-ba85yZ1yz vvqx?P=1z1412yZ1yocc4mZ1yzshdi
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