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WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

Modular Burnout
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Eurorack Modules Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next [all]
Author Modular Burnout
jordanb
Perhaps I built my system too quick....perhaps I don’t understand every module to its full capability. Either way....I’ve been sitting down to patch lately and just drawing blank. Every time I try to dig deep into one module, I end up patching a bunch and losing focus.

I feel like I should downsize or block off a couple modules to go to a smaller system.

How do you get motivated?
shredsickgnar
Get a 104hp skiff. Fill it and explore. Ignore all other modules. Empty and repeat.
Yes Powder
This is like a "Who's Who" of popular modules.
This was definitely built too fast, and more in line with a "studio-in-a-box" fantasy than actual Euro workflow practicality.

Half of me wants to say, "Ditch everything but the M32 and build from there based on what modules you find yourself needing," but I know that's not what you want to hear and I know I'd have a hard time doing that if I were in your shoes.

To start, ditch the Boomboxes. Those are meant for portable systems, and a system that big is sure as hell not portable. You can get much better sound for much less HP using a Line-Out module.
Next, ditch the Bitbox. I'm honestly not sure how you even intended to properly control that, considering it has a CV In for each sample and you don't have that many clocked outs to match it.
Unless you're really set on it, the Chord module should be the next to go. There are other ways to fudge chords in Euro, and proper use of it really requires some in-depth sequencing on the Voicing, Inversion, and Quality CV Ins, which your system is not really set up to do— despite having four sequencers.
You could also stand to get rid of maybe half of your Mutable/Makenoise collection here. I'll leave it up to you to decide which ones; just make sure you leave yourself enough utility to control what you keep.
You don't need this many sequencers either, really. Between the Mother, Charcot, René, Pressure Points, you're looking pretty stacked. Ditch the Charcot or René— whichever you're currently getting less use from.

Once you have a smaller system, hopefully you'll find it easier to focus on learning what you have. Good luck
DSC
Patch it with it turned off. What? Yes the audio can be a distraction at first.

I will meditate on a patch, sometimes for a couple of days. Take the next two days patching it. With no audio. Then the first thing I learn is was my first assumption about what I plugged in, actually what it does when I turn it on? If not, time to dig into the manual or go and look up some vids on those particular modules.

The larger the system, the longer to patch it up with no audio.
I give myself that challenge and it seems to keep me interested and less frustrated. Hope it helps.
jordanb
These are all good ideas.

Never thought about patching with the system off....interesting.

As for the boom boxes.....yeah...one is shot so I use the studio monitors anyway.

Never cared much for the bitbox. I’ll throw it up for sale.

Mahslo guys!
Rex Coil 7
... any actual pictures of it? ...
Muff McMuff
Take everything out. Position the M32 + Maths + one other module, in the corner of your rack and just go through everything that can be done with these. Work through the manual. Everything thats out on youtube about these modules, Muff searches, whatever. Later add one more module in. Explore it and rebuild your rack again one module at a time.

Or M32 +maths + other in a small skiff and do it that way.

Or give the whole thing a rest and do something totally different. Go hiking in Kona.
lisa
Motivation to make music doesn’t have anything to do with the gear, imo. Saying that you have too much stuff and therefore no motivation sounds very strange to me. Either you want to make music or you don’t. If you do you’ll make it with whatever tools you have. Some tools may be more fun to you than others but motivation comes from within.
Yes Powder
lisa wrote:
Motivation to make music doesn’t have anything to do with the gear, imo. Saying that you have too much stuff and therefore no motivation sounds very strange to me. Either you want to make music or you don’t. If you do you’ll make it with whatever tools you have. Some tools may be more fun to you than others but motivation comes from within.


I agree with this to a point. I think though OP’s problem is that with so many modules they are finding it difficult to actually focus in and learn any single module. Many of those modules are very deep multi-function dealies that require a lot of time and patience to fully explore, and I can totally understand how it’d be stifling to work in such a system. Like having the keys to the world, but not even knowing how to operate the clutch.
ggillon
Yes Powder wrote:
This is like a "Who's Who" of popular modules.
This was definitely built too fast, and more in line with a "studio-in-a-box" fantasy than actual Euro workflow practicality.


^^^^
This

OP, what do you want to do with modular synthesis exactly ?

This will help you focus on the modules you really need. For example I started with a shared system and realized what I wanted to do was "classical" rhythmic electronic music like techno and house so I added drum modules and a drum sequencer. Not because everyone said "a good modular synth needs module X and Y" but because I wanted to do techno

Limitations do help creativity. Such a big collection of modules won't really help you focus.
cptnal
shredsickgnar wrote:
Get a 104hp skiff. Fill it and explore. Ignore all other modules. Empty and repeat.


I agree!

...to a point. A Happy Ending Kit (80hp with power supply) with table-top ears. You don't need to fill it - pick three or four modules (e.g. Tides, Maths, Veils, STO) and put the rest in a cupboard. When you've got those modules down (and more importantly, the art of combining them) add another from your stash. And so on, as if you were building your rack again, but more slowly this time around. thumbs up
Yloopz
I had a bit of the same. Build my rack to fast and learned a lot of modules half. I thought I needed those modules... all of them. I dont have as much as you have but I shifted a lot in the last weeks and I am done with that too. I kept a diy case of 6u 60hp from the beginning of my adventure and I filled it with some of my modules. Explore things, making some patches and having fun. I like small systems, at the beginning of my modular path I gigged with this little case and I had so much fun! At this point I dont want to go back to my 'bigger' case. I even think about diy-ing another 6u 60hp and make two 'grooveboxes' and leave it that way....

I think we all go thru this moment, good luck and maybe leave the rack a week or so and do some other things like sports and walking etc. that helps as well to sort your head out...
wavecircle
DSC wrote:
Patch it with it turned off. What? Yes the audio can be a distraction at first.


I've done this live with my Serge, I was playing between sets and the monitoring was shit in the venue so had no choice. It's pretty scary at first but makes you realise how well you know your system.
djd_oz
Sometimes it takes months/years to learn and use the modules to it's full potential. Starting small and with limitations will help you explore those modules. I would suggest to start with a rack about a quarter of what you already have.
Zerstorte Zelle
As far as confusion on workflow and patching etc, I'd say you’re suffering from over saturation. I have a 7u 104 Intellijell case that I’ve been building for a few years now (almost full) and I still dive back through the manuals. Each time I do I learn more.

I find all that choice can be a bit distracting.

For me, the benefit of all this hardware is limitation. If you can’t pull up a million options you’re forced to make what you have work. This can yield interesting results but takes time. All in all though you will learn the modules you use inside and out.
hermbot
It's counter intuitive, but limitations breed creativity. An excess of options leads to a lack of motivation and analysis paralysis.
flashheart
I think it's missing the kitchen sink...
lisa
hermbot wrote:
It's counter intuitive, but limitations breed creativity. An excess of options leads to a lack of motivation and analysis paralysis.

Yep, except it’s all in your head. screaming goo yo
operator808
I have around 500hp of eurorack and I perform with a 6U x 84HP flight case due to airline cabin restrictions. And I have the time of my life every time I do it.

I would advise you to build a small case with one of each - Analog VCO, Digital VCO, VCA, VCF, Sequencer, Random (not Wogglebug), a couple of full fledge modulation sources that don't have menu diving like Pamela's, plug an Arturia Keystep into it and give the idea of a basic jam some thought rather than patching with an end goal in mind. You might have fun and it might re-kindle your interest.

xx
rayultine
I said in another similar post - modular burnout could also be related to creative burnout. For me, it was easy to say "aw crap I'm at the end of my rope with this rig. I never thought this would happen. Did I make a bad investment?" But looking back at the last few months, my creative losing streak has a lot more to do with work/family stress.

That said, you do have some silly modules like the speakers and the Chord. You could have some more fun with additional sources of modulation (maybe swap the 1010 bitbox for a 1010 toolbox?)

But I dunno, I would kill for that rig. Don't throw the baby out with the bath water? Read books on synthesis, do exercises with 1/2/3 modules only, watch youtube videos, etc. Just try to have fun!
cptnal
operator808 wrote:
Random (not Wogglebug)


hmmm..... I know this isn't Wikipedia, but surely that requires some qualification, like so...

operator808 wrote:
a couple of full fledge modulation sources that don't have menu diving like Pamela's
matthewjuran
It’s like surfing where you have to do things to get on the wave then you’re going to fall off.

For me I recall a moment where I got back from camping and felt immediate musical inspiration that wasn’t there before, and then it was gone the next day. But I got the recording.
LTodd
lisa wrote:
Motivation to make music doesn’t have anything to do with the gear, imo. Saying that you have too much stuff and therefore no motivation sounds very strange to me. Either you want to make music or you don’t. If you do you’ll make it with whatever tools you have. Some tools may be more fun to you than others but motivation comes from within.


Yeah, but making music isn't always a linear process. Not necessarily a "you want to do, so do" kind of thing. In the OP's situation it seems like motivation is less of an issue than inspiration.

The OP actually does seem motivated to make music, otherwise they wouldn't be asking for advice on better ways to approach their overwhelming amount of gear...a new approach that might lend to some inspiration.

On that note I agree with either smaller racks. But, since racks and power cost money, how about setting up multiple exercises of only using a few modules at a time. 3 module challenge, 5 modules, etc.
cptnal
I think the OP's issue is he (probably) has too many modules he doesn't know how to use properly rather than any lack of motivation or inspiration. We're in danger of drifting away from that and not offering anything useful.
Fastus
Take on that mountain a step at a time. Take one manual - maybe the SMR - and just focus on that single module - read some, experiment, read more. Think of the others only as support modules, they're not the target of your attention.

And before you get started, put on some music you like for some inspiration - maybe even switch on Muff's Radio - remind yourself what you like electronic music, and ease yourself into the right mood.
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