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Busbar systems
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> 5U Format Modules Goto page 1, 2  Next [all]
Author Busbar systems
Notron fn
So I’m thinking about taking out the QDH-20 power harness from my cabinet and putting in Busbars for power distribution.

I ran across this https://www.asi-ez.com/pix/doc/powerdistribution_busbars_datasheet.pdf #view=fitv din rail Busbar system and was wondering if something like this could work.
sduck
Are you having problems with your current power system? You probably want to identify what the problem is, and if a major refit like busbars is going to fix it.

I'm putting busbars in the large-ish euro case I'm building now, and while that page was pointed to me, I ended up getting everything from digikey, mostly because I already have an account with them.

Rex Coil 7 will chime in soon.....
Dr Gris
Waiting for Rex Coil 7...
Synthbuilder
The DIN system is very bulky - perfectly fine for what it was designed to do though.

Personally, I'd get some aluminium bars from a DIY store or online and make your own. The key though is making sure your electrical connections are solid. You can use some special paste to stop any corrosion and slow any oxidation. Rex will no doubt chime in with his recommendations.



Another alternative is to use a combination of bus bars and distribution boards. The bus bars feed the distribution boards which then feed the modules. That way you retain some cable flexibility and keep resistances low.

But as sduck writes, do you have a problem with your current system? Excessive crosstalk between modules are indicative of a power distribution problem.

Tony
TheDegenerateElite
Dr Gris wrote:
Waiting for Rex Coil 7...


No kidding, this is a tailor made question for him!


"Bus Bars? Lemme tell you about Bus Bars....."




.
Rex Coil 7
Sumbuddy say bus bars? I heard bus bars. Bus bars? I swear I heard bus bars somewhere. Bus bars? Bus bars!!

lol

The main reason to employ bus bars in a modular synth is to distribute power to the modules with the least resistance possible. That was some clumsy wording but I think I got the point across. The idea (essentially) is to get power from the terminals of the power supply (aka "turrets") to the module power cables as if the module power cable were connected directly to the power supply's turrets. So you need the wires that attach the power supply output turrets to the bus bars to be as thick and short as absolutely possible. Then, the bars themselves need to have as much aluminum-per-inch as you can practically manage.

The next thing bus bars provide is a means of connecting the modules' power cables that is the least resistant as possible (or practical). Using bus bars facilitates the use of eyelets to connect each wire of the module power cable to each rail. As was mentioned in this thread already, use of a "gas tight paste" that has zinc crystals impregnated into the paste is another "plus" going for bus bars. Aluminum forms an oxide on it's surface (think of it as "aluminum rust") that is very resistant to the flow of electricity. To prevent as much of that from forming as possible the "gas tight paste" is applied between the module power cable connection eyelets and the bus bars. The zinc crystals (zinc being a metal, with sharp edged shards) help to cut through the oxide on the surface of the aluminum bar (that oxide layer forms in milliseconds, and is about a molecule or so thick).

So the paste serves to cut through the oxide, and then the paste forms a "gas tight" connection. "Gas tight" meaning it shields the surface of the aluminum and the crimp-on eyelet from Oxygen, which is the "gas" that chemically reacts with the aluminum and forms the molecule-thick layer of aluminum oxide that resists the flow of electricity.

So "Bus Bars" is shorthand for an entire system.

** Short, thick wires that attach the bus bars to the power supply.
** Gas Tight Paste applied to the bus bars where the module power cables attach to the bars.
** Crimp-on eyelets on each wire of the module power cables.

This system produces a means of getting power from the power supply to the module power cables with the least amount of resistance possible. But if the entire system is not adopted, there is absolutely no point in "goin' bus bar" in your synth.

A bus bar system (done properly) distributes power to each module so efficiently, that the module farthest from the power supply will see almost the exact same amount of power as the module closest to the power supply. The voltage drop read (with a meter) at the module closest to the power supply will be very nearly the same as the voltage drop read at the module farthest from the power supply.

The module power cables themselves don't really need to be all super duper "high speed low drag" stuff, because the "resistance" of the module itself is so high.

Another reason a bus bar system used in a modular synth is a good thing is because it provides the electricity flowing "back to the power supply" through the ZERO VOLT bus bar sees far less resistance on it's way back to the power supply. Without going into a shitload of science/maths, just know that the Zero Volt electricity flowing back to the power supply from the module really REALLY wants to be met with the least amount of resistance possible. Bus bar systems are well suited for that.

Now remember, bus bars aren't worth two shits if they are not part of an entire system which includes the things I listed above with bullet points.

It is important that the use of crimp-on eyelets combined with the use of gas tight paste be employed along with the adoption of the bus bar system. I mean, you've already gone through all of the hassle and ass-busting to design a bus bar system, DIY the bars, drill sixty bazillion holes all nice and straight (not required, but you should always do your best effort ... just cuz), designed a method to mount the bars, mounted the bars, and every other detail .... so you may as well go all the way and use crimp-on eyelets and gas tight paste to really do it all "right".

Crimp-on eyelets with gas tight paste are a far FAR FAR better method of connecting the module power cables than going with "multi-pin headers". Just think of how much more surface area is making contact with the bus bar (per wire) when using crimp-on eyelets, compared with the little-itty-bitty pins/sockets in a multi-pin connection header. There's less resistance with eyelets/paste than there will ever be with a multi-pin header. And "less resistance" is the entire reason you went with a bus bar system in the first place!

The QDH-20 can be used ... ... just cut off the soldered "blob" where all of the wires are connected together, and then crimp eyelets on to the individual wires of each module power cable. That is precisely what I have done. It would help to shorten the cables themselves down to less than 18 inches each. Since the bus bars usually end up pretty close to each module, it will be easy to get those cables down to less than eighteen inches. The fact that the QDH-20 uses 24ga (which is kind of small) wire isn't a big deal, since the modules themselves have such high resistance. So having all new cables made of heavier gauge wire won't really help too much. But there's no reason you can't do it if that is what you wish ... I'd suggest using ... take a deep breath, this is a mouthful ..... MilSpec Aircraft grade TefZel ("teflon") insulated 19 strand 20 gauge wire. (whew!). It can be purchased at aircraft supply houses on the internet for roughly $0.09 cents per foot ($9.00 per 100 foot spools) plus shipping. It comes in about a half dozen colors.

So that's the rough idea behind using bus bars in a modular synth. The main goal is to have the electricity that is coming out of the power supply meet the least amount of resistance possible until it hits the module power cable. It requires an entire distribution system made up of several elements (short/thick wires from the PSU to the bars ... the bars themselves ... the means of connecting the module power cables to the bars, as in eyelets and gas tight paste).

I can provide far deeper details about how I went about making mine, as well as material sources, parts and pieces details (eyelet sizes, how to go about mounting the eyelets to the bars ... it's not as straightforward as it may seem, gas tight paste brand/part number/sources, and all the rest of that jive).

There are a great deal of details regarding my own bus bar system in my project synth thread ... there's a link at the very bottom in my signature .. something about "Super Mini Modular" or some such stuff. Click on it, it takes you to Page 7 of the project thread which is where all the "good stuff" begins.


~FIN~
cookie?!?







ranix
(opinion and experience follows, might not be 100% accurate)

I prefer the style of bus bar connectivity that Rex shows in his photos for modular usage over the DIN rail bus bar assembly you have linked in your original post. The DIN rail systems are primarily for use in manufacturing automation settings and exist to simplify full-stack debug of complex electrical issues, where power delivery can be part of the problem you need to diagnose and fix. Rex's ring terminal and bolt solution is more suitable for the type of installation you are performing here.

If I were to change one thing I think I would put a cover or shelf over the bus bars so that nothing can be dropped on them and cause a short.
diophantine
Notron fn wrote:
So I’m thinking about taking out the QDH-20 power harness from my cabinet and putting in Busbars for power distribution.

Out of curiosity (and as sduck indicated), are you having problems with your power distribution system, or is this just something you're wanting to do?

And also, what sort of cabinets do you have? (I can't imagine a bus-bar project going well in a Dotcom portable cabinet, for instance...)
sduck
What is this gas tight paste you speak of? Google searches are confusing me - I'm not sure if I want or need pipe sealant or exhaust compound.
Notron fn
In answer to questions about problems with current power set up...

My biggest problem is that I’ve run out of connections. I have a 44 space cabinet, a 20 end power harness, and need moar modules.

I’ve also got plenty of space in the cabinet that could prolly fit a busbar setup in there somewhere.





I mean on the one hand, a busbar setup like Rex’s could be overkill.

But what’s wrong with overkill?
JohnLRice
Notron fn wrote:
My biggest problem is that I’ve run out of connections. I have a 44 space cabinet, a 20 end power harness, and need moar modules.

I mean on the one hand, a busbar setup like Rex’s could be overkill.

But what’s wrong with overkill?
screaming goo yo w00t screaming goo yo Moar is good, Overkill is better, Moar Overkill is best! hihi thumbs up

That said, it would probably be quickest and easiest to just buy the QDH40 (40 cable harness) for $95.00? hmmm..... hihi
Rex Coil 7
ranix wrote:
If I were to change one thing I think I would put a cover or shelf over the bus bars so that nothing can be dropped on them and cause a short.
A piece of "felt" laid over the bar array and secured with small squares of hook and pile ("Velcro") would provide peace of mind (a la Hammond organ tonewheel generator). However it's not necessary. There shouldn't be anything loose in your system that could create a dead short across the bars anyhow. If that were the situation, every single module would also require some sort of cover to protect the PCBs from shorting. If shorting the bars together is a concern while you are working on the synth, shame on you for putting your hands inside of a live electrical device. Main power should be disconnected, with the wall plug visibly disconnected from the wall socket (so you can actually see it with your eyes that it is disconnected) prior to fiddling around inside of your synth. These are just my own personal rules developed while having owned and operated a power equipment repair center for over fifteen years. You will only work on a 480vac plasma cutter while it is still plugged in ONE TIME, and you will never ever forget to disconnect the device being repaired ever again. Don't ask me how I know that.

sduck wrote:
What is this gas tight paste you speak of? Google searches are confusing me - I'm not sure if I want or need pipe sealant or exhaust compound.
Neither.

MANUFACTURER LINK =
https://www.acehardware.com/departments/automotive-rv-and-marine/fluid s-and-lubrication/lubricants/3429180

eBAY VENDOR LINK = https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_nkw=Ox+gard+400&_sacat=0&_s op=15

I pumped a 4oz tube of it into a small plastic tub (jar?) to make it easier to dispense. A very small amount is required at each joint, so I typically use a "modeler's paint brush" like what you use to paint one of those model cars many of us grew up around (Monogram models). A toothpick or chopstick (or the like) may also be used. Putting into a jar also facilitates stirring the paste once it begins separating. The oils will separate from the substrate after it sits for a few months, a lot like how peanut butter will separate in the jar after a time. So it helps to put it in a vessel to make it easier to stir it up. One 4oz tube is enough to build ten synthesizers, with 44 modules each. But I also use it in other places, such as between the barrel of a 1/4" jack and the module's panel (for the same reasons I use it on bus bars).

The panels I use are those made by Front Panel Express. I order them anodized on both sides. Anodized aluminum is resistive to the flow of electricity, so I use stainless steel "inside star lock washers" (aka "shake proof washers" in the UK). The cleats of the stainless lock washers cut right through the anodizing, exposing bare aluminum. Using gas tight paste in this application allows the fresh cuts to be more conductive, and remain conductive.





It may be argued that the tiny size of those cuts won't make a difference in conductivity. On my VCO and VCF panels there are twenty eight jacks, each with a lock washer. Each lock washer has ten cleats. That totals out to two hundred eighty cuts through the anodizing into bare aluminum. Combining the use of stainless steel inside star lock washers, soldering "bus wire" on each jack and connecting all of the "sleeve" tabs together, and gas tight paste creates an entire "system" of panel grounding to the shield tabs of all of the jacks, which may then be connected to a single "chassis grounding stud" (I use a 0.250" stainless steel hex head bolt mounted in the module panel).





Then all of the panel grounding studs (of each module panel) may be connected to one another with wire and eyelets, and ultimately to the chassis ground nearest the power supply. Which is also the same location that the Zero Volt bus bar will be connected to "bond" (fancy word for "connect") the Zero Volt rail to the Chassis ground "system". From there it connects to the "ground pin" wire of the main power cable. It also helps to make your main power cables (the power cable you plug into the wall socket) as short as practical.

The diagram below was something I drew up a couple of years ago when I was corresponding with an electrical engineer about my power system. That explains the questions that you see in the diagram. The important thing to see is that the Zero Volt bar and the Chassis Ground "wire" are connected together in the input side of the power transformer.



If you're gonna go for it, REALLY GO FOR IT!!!!


Notron fn wrote:
My biggest problem is that I’ve run out of connections. I have a 44 space cabinet, a 20 end power harness, and need moar modules.
My cabinet with the bus bars in it is only 14MU wide and 9 inches deep. My bus bars are roughly 25 inches long, and have 24 connection locations (for up to 24 powered modules). Placing the connection holes in the bus bars 0.500 inches apart yields AT LEAST 70 (seventy) connection holes. Eyelets may also be "stacked" if more module power cables are required. Do you have more than seventy modules in your system that require power?

Notron fn wrote:
I’ve also got plenty of space in the cabinet that could prolly (*probably) fit a busbar setup in there somewhere.
The 44sp cabinet is roughly 4 feet wide, it can accommodate bus bars that are at least forty inches long. Taking away roughly 4 inches of useful bus bar length devoted to mounting the bars leaves 36 inches of bus bar for connection holes. One connection hole every 0.500 inches yields seventy two (72) module connection holes. And as I said, eyelets may be stacked or placed on both sides of the bus bars, thereby adding even more connection locations.

Notron fn wrote:
I mean on the one hand, a busbar setup like Rex’s could be overkill.

But what’s wrong with overkill?
You have a four foot long synthesizer comprised of individual synthesizer modules, with close to two hundred jack points and you're talking about "overkill"? Think about that.

lol lol lol lol

Bus bars are not "overkill", they are appropriate. Especially considering the application. After all, it's a "modular synth" .... there is no such thing as "overkill" when it comes to a modular synthesizer. A modular synthesizer itself is a large wooden box of "overkill".

thumbs up

JohnLRice wrote:
Notron fn wrote:
I mean on the one hand, a busbar setup like Rex’s could be overkill. But what’s wrong with overkill?
screaming goo yo w00t screaming goo yo Moar is good, Overkill is better, Moar Overkill is best! hihi thumbs up

That said, it would probably be quickest and easiest to just buy the QDH40 (40 cable harness) for $95.00? hmmm..... hihi
That is a set of conflicting ideas. "Moar overkill is best" ..... "just buy the QDH 40" .... those two notions completely conflict with one another.

Just sayin' .... Mr. Green

I'll point out that many people may say this type of power distribution is not needed. After all, we've been using the sub-standard methods that synth vendors have insisted is "enough" for many years, right?

Well, yes .... however;

In the 1960s cars were built without seatbelts. In the 1970s seatbelts were made mandatory. In the latter part of the 1970s seatbelts were upgraded to the single shoulder harness we are all familiar with today, and those were also made mandatory. Injuries and fatalities reduced in orders of magnitude when the evolved seatbelt-to-shoulder harness became mandatory. But "we don't need no stinkin' seatbelts, let alone those horrible shoulder harnesses, after all, we been drivin' without them all the way up to the 1970s. Seatbelts aren't needed, and shoulder harnesses are downright overkill".

And yet today we all know ... factually so ... that the use of shoulder harnesses reduce injuries and fatalities in collisions (so much so that insurance companies will not pay injury claims if the injured person was not wearing a shoulder harness ... because insurance companies know that shoulder harnesses reduce injuries and fatalities) ... and there are many many documents which prove that. So much so that we take their use as "normal" anymore.

The exact same conclusion may be drawn regarding the use of the "underkill" power distribution systems synth vendors supply us with vs. using a bus bar system. The bus bar system is equal to the shoulder harness in the analogy above.

Just because the synth vendor (or car maker) doesn't provide us with bus bars (or seat belts) doesn't mean the power distribution systems provided by the synth maker (or lack of seatbelts) is the best way to go. It is the LEAST COSTLY way to go.

Give some of what I said here some thought.

pbear :(
JohnLRice
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
JohnLRice wrote:
Notron fn wrote:
I mean on the one hand, a busbar setup like Rex’s could be overkill. But what’s wrong with overkill?
screaming goo yo w00t screaming goo yo Moar is good, Overkill is better, Moar Overkill is best! hihi thumbs up

That said, it would probably be quickest and easiest to just buy the QDH40 (40 cable harness) for $95.00? hmmm..... hihi
That is a set of conflicting ideas. "Moar overkill is best" ..... "just buy the QDH 40" .... those two notions completely conflict with one another.

Just sayin' .... Mr. Green
Just throwing out options. razz Sometimes just getting things done OK and quickly is preferable to spending a lot longer making things as near perfection as possible. spinning I'm hungry right now and would love to have a multi course steak and prawns meal at a 5 star restaurant but I will probably just go downstairs and nuke a can of beans and a package of pre-cooked rice! hihi
Graham Hinton
Notron fn wrote:

I ran across this https://www.asi-ez.com/pix/doc/powerdistribution_busbars_datasheet.pdf #view=fitv din rail Busbar system and was wondering if something like this could work.


Define "work". It will conduct electricity better than a pcb distribution board, but the question should be "how much better?". That system has 3x10mm bars and lots of clips adding resistance, I don't recommend it. I use 10x15mm bars minimum.

Synthbuilder wrote:
Another alternative is to use a combination of bus bars and distribution boards. The bus bars feed the distribution boards which then feed the modules. That way you retain some cable flexibility and keep resistances low.


No. All that does is add unwanted resistance. 5U module power headers are "board to wire" types so it is unnecessary to go back into pcb traces and soldered joints.

The object of a busbar system is to reduce common impedance coupling in the power rails and to reduce the 0V module to module resistance between any two modules. Busbar resistances should be in the order of a fraction of a milliohm. Supply cables to the busbars should be in the order of a milliohm or so. Module to module resistance becomes essentially the sum of two module cable wires as they are greater than the busbar joining them.

Here's a case study of how busbars solved one user's 5U problem and others he did not know he had:
Holding key sends osc sharp?

Ranix wrote:
If I were to change one thing I think I would put a cover or shelf over the bus bars so that nothing can be dropped on them and cause a short.


Most power supplies shut down in milliseconds when their outputs are shorted.
neil.johnson
sduck wrote:
What is this gas tight paste you speak of? Google searches are confusing me - I'm not sure if I want or need pipe sealant or exhaust compound.

This was discussed some time ago...
https://www.muffwiggler.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=1464038&highlight=#1 464038
and
https://www.muffwiggler.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=2069960&highlight=#2 069960

Neil
Rex Coil 7
neil.johnson wrote:
sduck wrote:
What is this gas tight paste you speak of? Google searches are confusing me - I'm not sure if I want or need pipe sealant or exhaust compound.

This was discussed some time ago...
https://www.muffwiggler.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=1464038&highlight=#1 464038
and
https://www.muffwiggler.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=2069960&highlight=#2 069960

Neil
None of that information offers anything beyond what has been covered in this thread.

cool
neil.johnson
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
neil.johnson wrote:
sduck wrote:
What is this gas tight paste you speak of? Google searches are confusing me - I'm not sure if I want or need pipe sealant or exhaust compound.

This was discussed some time ago...
https://www.muffwiggler.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=1464038&highlight=#1 464038
and
https://www.muffwiggler.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=2069960&highlight=#2 069960

Neil
None of that information offers anything beyond what has been covered in this thread.

cool

You might want to check the first link you posted in https://www.muffwiggler.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=2999708#2999708 as that results in a "403 Forbidden".

Neil
diophantine
neil.johnson wrote:
You might want to check the first link you posted in https://www.muffwiggler.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=2999708#2999708 as that results in a "403 Forbidden".

The acehardware link? They may have locked down their site to avoid GDPR; works within the US.
tardishead
Quote:
Just throwing out options. razz Sometimes just getting things done OK and quickly is preferable to spending a lot longer making things as near perfection as possible. spinning I'm hungry right now and would love to have a multi course steak and prawns meal at a 5 star restaurant but I will probably just go downstairs and nuke a can of beans and a package of pre-cooked rice! hihi



I guess everybody has to weigh up their own situations.
I built a system about 15-20 years ago. I was happy making crazy sounds for quite a while but then I wanted to make more precise patches and I discovered that my system was just not up to it. Crosstalk, intermodulations, clicks, noise, etc. I fell out of love with something I had invested a lot in
Not good. I had to improve it and make good on my investment.
It became an obsession. I installed some better power supplies, better wire harnesses but I could still hear small amounts of unwanted modulation.
I have just made 4 new portable cabinets for my modules and I installed the busbar system as advocated by Mr Hinton and with help from Rex Coil.

Result:
ROCK SOLID - no crosstalk at all. No hum no noise
I am just starting to use it again after doing these mods and I must say its the best thing I ever did. I'm in love with my system again and I can't stop using it
tardishead
I must say though a lot of old classic synths do have crap power supplies and distribution. You can hear crosstalk on a lot of the classics
Its up to you to decide what is "overkill" or "correct". Rex Coil made me question this about a year ago and its been a very worthwhile journey.
Rex Coil 7
neil.johnson wrote:
You might want to check the first link you posted in https://www.muffwiggler.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=2999708#2999708 as that results in a "403 Forbidden".

Neil
I checked it before I posted it, and I just checked it again .... works fine.

seriously, i just don't get it

Movin' on .....


JohnLRice wrote:
Just throwing out options. razz Sometimes just getting things done OK and quickly is preferable to spending a lot longer making things as near perfection as possible. spinning I'm hungry right now and would love to have a multi course steak and prawns meal at a 5 star restaurant but I will probably just go downstairs and nuke a can of beans and a package of pre-cooked rice! hihi
I totally hear ya John. I get so itchy when I hear my brother making really great sounds belching out of his dual Korg Monologue system that I start shopping for some immediate solution (like a Monologue, or the new Minilogue XD, or some other this-n-that) because my modular isn't finished yet. In fact, I've set the modular project aside for just about a week so I can complete a slide guitar project I started a few years ago but never completed. Among all of my projects on the "GIDDIT DUN!" list, the slide axe is the one that will complete the fastest and provide me with a means of making loud/rude noises. That will help to scratch the itch while modular project is being completed.

I reckon if I apply myself I can get the modular up on it's feet in less than one month. I have all of the pieces needed, I just need to put it together.

But that is one hell of a long month. Every time my brother fires his rig up (which is almost every night) that longing sets in. The urge to nuke the can of beans and grab a few flour torts is so hard to resist. But that is what the slide guitar will satisfy ... there's just enough fat, salt, and sugar in that thing to relieve the withdrawal symptoms from being without my Mondo Synthage! In fact, you've inspired me .... I may even name that guitar "Loco Frijoles". (I'll be posting the progress pics of that beasty in one of the subforums in a few days here).

But look here .... there is no reason that a very large portion of a bus bar power system can't be "prefabbed" outside of the synth cabinet while that cab is still in use with a quick-n-dirty squid system. Then when it's time to actually install the bus bar system and do final fit-up and such, you'll have less than two weeks down time while the cab is opened up and bus bar system installation is completed. So a lot of the bus bar system fabrication can be done in parallel with the synth being in use (powered by a simple squid distribution system like the QDH20 or QDH40).

There is hope. Hug
Rex Coil 7
tardishead wrote:
Quote:
Just throwing out options. razz Sometimes just getting things done OK and quickly is preferable to spending a lot longer making things as near perfection as possible. spinning I'm hungry right now and would love to have a multi course steak and prawns meal at a 5 star restaurant but I will probably just go downstairs and nuke a can of beans and a package of pre-cooked rice! hihi



I guess everybody has to weigh up their own situations.
I built a system about 15-20 years ago. I was happy making crazy sounds for quite a while but then I wanted to make more precise patches and I discovered that my system was just not up to it. Crosstalk, intermodulations, clicks, noise, etc. I fell out of love with something I had invested a lot in
Not good. I had to improve it and make good on my investment.
It became an obsession. I installed some better power supplies, better wire harnesses but I could still hear small amounts of unwanted modulation.
I have just made 4 new portable cabinets for my modules and I installed the busbar system as advocated by Mr Hinton and with help from Rex Coil.

Result:
ROCK SOLID - no crosstalk at all. No hum no noise
I am just starting to use it again after doing these mods and I must say its the best thing I ever did. I'm in love with my system again and I can't stop using it
That ... is ... so ... BITCHIN!!!! The merits of the bus bar system on full display there folks.

tardishead wrote:
I must say though a lot of old classic synths do have crap power supplies and distribution. You can hear crosstalk on a lot of the classics
Its up to you to decide what is "overkill" or "correct". Rex Coil made me question this about a year ago and its been a very worthwhile journey.
Damn man. .... you have no idea how much this warms my heart. I get more happiness out of knowing I helped someone live a better life (even if it's just enjoying their synth) than anything I could ever do for myself.

Thank you very much for that. I'm pleased beyond words that I helped you out, even if in the smallest bit, with some inspiration and perhaps a little shove to get you moving.

Rex.



(it's difficult to type when I'm boppin' along with AC/DC "Girl's Got Rhythm" playing on internet radio .... "No doubt about it, can't live without it ... The girl's got rhythm .... she got the back seat rhythm". hells yea!)


headbang
Rex Coil 7
dbl post
Synthbuilder
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
I checked it before I posted it, and I just checked it again .... works fine.

This one?

https://www.acehardware.com/departments/automotive-rv-and-marine/fluid s-and-lubrication/lubricants/3429180

I get '403 Forbidden' too. As diophantine says they may have locked out overseas visitors.

Tony
JohnLRice
Synthbuilder wrote:
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
I checked it before I posted it, and I just checked it again .... works fine.

This one?

https://www.acehardware.com/departments/automotive-rv-and-marine/fluid s-and-lubrication/lubricants/3429180

I get '403 Forbidden' too. As diophantine says they may have locked out overseas visitors.

Tony
Looks like Amazon in the UK and eBay there as well have the same or at least very similar products available? Here's a couple FWIW:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/GB-Ox-Gard-General-Purpose-Anti-Oxident-Com pound-1-oz-Tube/371990494922\

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Gardner-Bender-OX-100B-Anti-Oxidant-Compound/ dp/B000BODU66
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