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Creating bass lines
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Modular Synth General Discussion  
Author Creating bass lines
msegarra
I’ve been looking around but am kinda stumped as to where to begin with creating bass lines that move well because everything I make now lacks the groove I’m looking for was hoping some of you patch chord wizards could point it in the right direction?? Rockin' Banana!
StrangeAttraction
Search YouTube man.
Also this mylarmelodies video is a good start: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d8L4NPg8gh0&t=765s
naturligfunktion
I suggest that you programme a sequencer to play some funky notes. Nothing to complicated, something simple that doesn't get repetetive. Make the melodic pattern run 4 or 8 steps.

Meanwhile, you have another gate that open and close your envelope for the bass VCA. Make that gate pattern funky, and make it in a different amount of steps, e.g. 5 or 7.

Keep it simple and play around with the pitch and the gate pattern. Before long you will have a "hypnotic groove" that is funky and cool

cool
EATyourGUITAR
an expanded turing machine is great to get started. or just play it from the keyboard. it helps to have a drum beat playing when you write bass lines. bass lines always sound better with drums. maybe you have good bass lines already but you think they are bad?
cptnal
Clock dividers and multipliers combined with logic (and logic inverters) go a long way towards coming up with trigger sequences I would never have thought of.
commodorejohn
EATyourGUITAR wrote:
it helps to have a drum beat playing when you write bass lines. bass lines always sound better with drums.

This, for sure. A lot of learning to construct good basslines is in practicing until you develop an ear for it, but it helps to start with the other half of the rhythm section already going so that you can hear how they interlock. Start by playing around with having the bass part mimic the timing of one piece of the drum kit; then try another. What if it's following both the kick and snare? Shift it so that it's hitting with one piece, and filling in for another piece on the (sub-)beats where that one isn't sounding. See what that does to the rhythm. Just starting messing around with different counting patterns (3-3-2, 2-1-1, etc.) and see what develops.

Melodically, you can start with the basics: root, root/octave, root/fifth, etc. There's nothing wrong with these, but play around with them too. Try some bass guitar-style tricks; instead of going plain root/octave or root/fifth, say, try doing a quick fourth/fifth or seventh/octave like it's a hammer-on. Try developing a harmonic accompaniment to the lead and just playing it down in the bass register; does it sound good that way? Wander around the scale a bit and see if you stumble on something interesting.

Most of all, listen to great bassists and try to discern what they do according to standard formula and what they do differently; try to figure out the hows and whys, and incorporate these lessons into your own work.
Parnelli
I do a lot of random stuff, and I usually take my cv for bass note pitch from the Wogglebug or another random generator and put that through the A-156. I'll trigger the WB and the A-156 together and let the bass do it's thing while using cv to keep the pitch low on the WB.

A substitute for the WB is the Z8000, I'll sequence a bass line, run it through the A-156 and then use the scale input on the 156 to change scale/pitch cv.

As far as triggering is concerned I often use my Pulsar, but I like to mix it up a bit through other logic like Polg to get offbeat syncopation. I also use my Mother 32's for bass a lot, just whip up a little sequence bass ditty and let er rip!

My favorite lazy assed bass rig though is Plonk with any trigger... instant bass lines!
PhineasFreak
remember, spaces.

in music rests are as important as notes - the ocassional gap then note landing off beat or syncopation makes things funky...
cornutt
PhineasFreak wrote:
remember, spaces.

in music rests are as important as notes - the ocassional gap then note landing off beat or syncopation makes things funky...


"Flood the zone" can also be an effective strategy with bass, if you use it judiciously. E.g., the beginning of Tears for Fears' "Shout"
artieTwelve
I use a Make Noise Renee to dial in simple sequences and then run it through a DPO to get a fat bass.
jorg
Thanks to CommodoreJohn and EatYourGuitar for some really great ideas!
MindMachine
Invert the envelope. Don't know why. Sounds good.
PhineasFreak
MindMachine wrote:
Invert the envelope. Don't know why. Sounds good.


same reason sidechaining to a kick or other low end sound is effective?
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