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WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

Euro Modular Synth ReadMe.1st
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Eurorack Modules Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4 ... 9, 10, 11  Next [all]
Author Euro Modular Synth ReadMe.1st
brenne
definitely get the pittsburgh modular timetable. It's the only clock divider Ive tried, but since I've owned it I haven't felt the need to keep looking.

It's not even just about keeping things in time. And one of the nice things about the Timetable is that you can input two different signals, tweak the knobs and watch it go nuts.

I think of it kind of like an event generator, as well as a good 'brain' for a patch.

As an event generator, say I've got a VCO droning away on one note and that's the start of my patch. Now, say I want to modulate the PW with an LFO. Without a timetable, that LFO is pretty much tied up with that VCO. If you run that VCO into a filter, you'll need a multi (or a second output) for the LFO to modulate it. And even then, it'll be modulated in time with the PW of the VCO. Gets pretty static real quickly. And if you have a second LFO, you're gonna have to try to keep it in time with the first, which can be a real headache.

With a timetable, you can patch the LFO into it and then use it to

With a timetable, you can run the LFO's second out into the timetable, and then use that timetable to modulate the filter on the four. Just like that: way more interesting patch.

Combine this with a Maths that will let you delay triggers and/or use the EGs to move off of the grid a little bit, and you get to create that 'whole little world' thing.
jbucks
I was going to ask how one uses Maths as a trigger delay - is that perhaps the 'voltage controlled pulse delay' example on the last page of the Maths manual?
dalasv
You just take the End of Cycle output. You send a trigger to the input and then the length of the cycle (rise and fall) determines the trigger delay.
Hanz
Most Doepfer case screws are M3 x 6 mm, most Analogue Systems case screws are M2.5 x 6.
For certain cases (RS-10 / RS-15) longer screws are required, something like 20 / 30 mm (I think).
PhineasFreak
jbucks wrote:
I was going to ask how one uses Maths as a trigger delay - is that perhaps the 'voltage controlled pulse delay' example on the last page of the Maths manual?


the pulse-delay patch is basicallty just a way of adding a dynamic shape to PWM with cv control on the delay before the PWM contour is applied.

i.e. if you're using PWM (or any other envelope based waveshaping etc.) that patch allows a very complex dynamic shaping of that function.

for those who need an even more basic explanation, maybe it's apropriate for me to write a separate entry about PWM etc..

Hanz wrote:
Most Doepfer case screws are M3 x 6 mm, most Analogue Systems case screws are M2.5 x 6.
For certain cases (RS-10 / RS-15) longer screws are required, something like 20 / 30 mm (I think).


just to make things even more annoying, the screws used on a number of the sliding-nut rails by people like monorocket are a different thread again (afraid i don't remember what it was offhand)
flashheart
A couple of things:

Multiples are only for splitting signals, they shouldn't be used for mixing.

Just about anything in the modular can potentially produce a noise. Any voltage changing fast enough can be heard as audio.
Gate signals can be heard as clicks - use these to 'ring' filters (eg. the Buchla bongo...), self cycling envelopes can be used a oscillators etc.
PhineasFreak
flashheart wrote:
...Multiples are only for splitting signals, they shouldn't be used for mixing...


then why does ASys specifically state:

ASys wrote:
This RS20 multiple may be used as a simple mixer with unity gain.


ASys wrote:
If you simply wish to sum the signals, you can use the
RS170 as a pair of passive 4-channel mixers with unity gain.
jbucks
@dalasv - thanks for the tip, didn't realise it was that simple.

@PhineasFreak - I might be one of those who need a more basic explanation! lol I know what PWM is, just not sure about what you mean about envelope based wave shaping.
PhineasFreak
jbucks wrote:
...@PhineasFreak - I might be one of those who need a more basic explanation! lol I know what PWM is, just not sure about what you mean about envelope based wave shaping.


sorry, i didn't use the clearest description there:

Though PWM is specific to pulsewaves, many VCOs have waveshaping options for the other waves too - certain modules also offer wave shaping as a function in it's own right and hence can be used as a tool with any ac input (maybe even dc too if built for it?).

PWM/Waveshaping doesn't really have the most exciting effect on it' own - when a constant tone is played at a given waveshape it just sounds rougher or more harmonically rich when run through a resonant filter or more hollow etc.

the real fun enters when the shape is altered dynamically (i.e. with time) - by using an EG or LFO or other modulation source you can get realy cool sounds from long evolving drones to rich textured hollow timbres.

i have recently been experimenting with using the PWM/Waveshaping inputs instead of the FM input on my VCOs, but with everything else setup for FM synhtesis. writing this post has inspired me further - am wondering what happens if i take a standard FM'ed/Ringmod bell patch and substitute the FM input for PWM input on that and then use an LPG instead of the VCA in either an operator/modulation block or the final EG...

watch this space!
wadesey
Helpful info in this one, thanks. And with that, I can search...
PhineasFreak
Here's an important thing i missed that's really basic and pretty much totally relevant to modulars but few other synths:

To change anything on a module without turning a knob in real time, you need it to have a cv input and to apply a cv signal to it.

but what if you want to control how much cv goes in and the module has no knob to adjust this? you need an attenuator or a VCA!

- attenuators are usually passive and hence can reduce the amount of signal out of the cv source, effectively acting as a simple fine control knob for the modules that dont have them built in.

- VCAs are amplifiers that can be cv'ed. i.e. they can boost a signal as well as being used to attenuate depending how they are used. this has more uses than just the obvious:

not only can a VCA be used as a cv'able way of controlling modulation sources, hence be a real clever attenuator or control knob, such as applying an LFO to the VCA to make the amount of modulation vary, but also they can be used to make a signal 'hotter' - to overdrive other modules so adding warmth in small amounts or distortion when pushed harder.

This demonstrates that expensive modules with more cv options and more knobs, though basically having built in VCAs, may not necessarily be better.

VCAs have differing sounds depending on components, circuit design etc. - and more importantly, depending how hard they're pushed or how hot a signal they're fed. therefore sometimes you can get a totally different sound by using a VCA to control not just the amount of modulation or even shaping it by even more modules, but also by simply choosing one with the right sound.

this is why people will always be telling you:

srsly never

(i actually find i cant live without a quad VCA and a Quad attenuator with bias option regardless of how many sockets and knobs my other modules have - the VCA for reasons explained above, the attenuator because some modules are so finnicky and sensitive that a knob twist or signal change of a hair's breadth with go from no response through absolute sweet spot to raw distorton.

this is especially true when bi-polar signals are involved and suddenly you're dealing with signals being finnicky in two ends of a spectum. oh - and the bias or offset option is incredibly helpful 'cos it allows you not just to shift -ve to +ve etc. but also to use ac audio signals as dc cv signals...)
Naestran
So, I have a rather simple question as I am a n00bie...
I always read about AC, DC and Offset... I managed to understand that AC is an audio signal and DC is a CV. Is there anything more to know about this? And what is offset? For example, what is the use of an offsetgenerator?
matttech
PhineasFreak wrote:

This demonstrates that even though expensive modules with more cv options and more knobs, though being bgger, and even more expensive ones having these extra cv options crammed into smaller modules, though basically having built in VCAs, may not necessarily be better.


excellent and useful post, and - as i'm sure you'd like some constructive criticism on the intelligibility of it - I'd just like to draw your attention to the paragraph above. It's a little hard to make out what you're saying here - I can pretty much imagine the point you are making, but it could possibly be written more clearly

I only mention this as you've obviously gone to great pains to make the information concise and easy to understand, and this part detracts from it a bit.

good work though, and really useful for modular beginners thumbs up
komyta
Naestran wrote:
So, I have a rather simple question as I am a n00bie...
I always read about AC, DC and Offset... I managed to understand that AC is an audio signal and DC is a CV. Is there anything more to know about this? And what is offset? For example, what is the use of an offsetgenerator?

1. AC can also be a CV. What would make it CV or Audio is the oscillation rate, also called frequency. For example, a Low Frequency Oscillator is an oscillator whose oscillation rates are too slow to be heard as pitches.

2. Offset is a voltage that you apply to a certain parameter to set a "basic" setting before applying modulation to that setting.
For example, you have a VCO that you want to play at a fixed pitch, and sometimes modulate this pitch.
To do this you can send a fixed voltage (that one would be the offset, coming from, say, a Doepfer A-176) to the first pitch CV input of your VCO, then sometimes send a dynamic signal (that is the modulation voltage, coming from, say, a Doepfer A-140) to a second pitch CV input of that same VCO.

I hope this helps, I reckon my skills are still limited when I have to write in english... oops
PhineasFreak
matttech wrote:
...as i'm sure you'd like some constructive criticism on the intelligibility of it


duly fixed!

thomas_grey wrote:
I hope this helps, I reckon my skills are still limited when I have to write in english... oops


maybe a diagram to help?



that is an example of a common reason for applying an offset to a signal - shifting the whole thing but keeping the shape and scale the same so that it might for example modulate a filter without closing it even though it would otherwise have resulted in silence...
madcaplaughs
Great post for beginners!
EGA
top thread, as a noob waiting for my first modules I welcome any detailed info from experienced users. thx a lot! thumbs up
maxxmod
Really helpful post!

Thanks
simfonik
Excellent post! thumbs up
Barcode
Top Notch! Top Notch!
MegaHercZ
Thank you very much!!

Much appreciated!
Nuuj
Why wasn't this stickied?
Noise for Fiction
Stickie seriously, i just don't get it seriously, i just don't get it
PhineasFreak
I started writing all this out in the wiki, far better than it is in this thread - but that's kinda stalled atm.

might be the main reason it's not stickied tho...
cger
So much great information!!! This is really great thread!!!
I'm starting out from zero, only have an empty case right now and one VCO on order. All this information will really help planning thing slowly.
Thank You
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