TTSH Ver.3 (rev.8) General build thread

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LED-man
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TTSH Ver.3 (rev.8) General build thread

Post by LED-man » Wed Nov 30, 2016 8:54 am

update: 12.January mouser link and BOM
update: 13 January major bug found
update 13. Feb 2017 schematics link
This BUILD thread is only for the TTSH rev.3 (aka pcb version rev8) release date 15. December 2016.

General TTSH discussion thread:
viewtopic.php?t=82997&highlight=

Major changes:
- improved powersection (DC-DC converters offboard)
- Selectable filter 4012/4072

Minor changes/bugfixes/improvements:
- RCA jacks on board for reverb connection
- Rate LED on S&H intensity fix

Known bugs/issues: (update link July 2017)

https://www.dsl-man.de/display/TTSH/TTSH+Release+rev.3
knownissues:
there´s a major bug found at 12.Jan.2017.

Schematics:
http://thehumancomparator.net/wordpress ... matics.pdf

BOM
this BOM isn´t 100% approved yet, but 99% is correct:
NEW Mouser basket link:
update 12.jan. 2017, i changed the BOM (removed the rev.2 psu unused parts for rev.3), further improvements in parts quantity - see notice field in mouser next to the quantity field.
http://www.mouser.com/ProjectManager/Pr ... 6CEDD31990


if you want the paperform:
please use the rev.2 BOM, due to changes in the psu, you dont need the 3 chokes from rev.2 BOM
http://thehumancomparator.net/wordpress ... hv2BOM.pdf
http://thehumancomparator.net/wordpress ... 7v2BOM.pdf
plus:
the attached file for the filter.


rare part kits are offered by thonk.co.uk
https://www.thonk.co.uk/shop/ttsh-rare-parts/
http://synthcube.com
feel free to ask me for matched transistor pairs

TTSH metal cases can be ordered as build to order with the pcb/panel order, check http://thehumancomparator.net/ on 15.Dec.2016

official build guide
check again later - there´s no complete rev.3 guide, its a additional guide for filter and psu.

DSL-man /LED-man rev.3 build guide
https://www.dsl-man.de/display/DSO/TTSH ... ling+guide

issues/frequently/ questions/answers:
1. Gatebooster
the TTSH needs a 10V Gate AND Trigger signal,
you need a addional gatebooster pcb.
there are 2 Gatebooster Versions on the market:
1. from Altitude909 gatebooster https://oshpark.com/shared_projects/ScFatTHR
2. from Fuzzbass with header for midi-implant. https://oshpark.com/shared_projects/mYFtCAXo
(fuzzbass starts a groupbuy) more later here

the Gatebooster is available from thonk, synthcube, oshpark (check again in january if not listed yet)

Gatebooster buid guilde:
https://www.dsl-man.de/display/DSO/TTSH+Gatebooster

2. MIDI-Implant kit:
http://www.midimplant.com/

3. VCO Sync:
pcb: https://oshpark.com/shared_projects/q9qiqYIa
build docu: https://www.dsl-man.de/display/DSO/TTSH ... ync+Option
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Last edited by LED-man on Thu Jul 20, 2017 4:19 pm, edited 10 times in total.
################################
TTSH Support Page and other DIY Projects:
https://www.DSL-man.de

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fuzzbass
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Post by fuzzbass » Wed Nov 30, 2016 11:56 am

Gatebooster PCBs will be available from Synthcube and Thonk. ETA third week of December.
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intheocean
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Post by intheocean » Sat Dec 03, 2016 8:15 am

Hi everyone,

This my first post here but i was following the some of the threads before.
I have a question about the building process of TTSH.

I love the sound of 2600 and desperately want one but I don't have any electricity knowledge, only effect pedals from Musikding and made some other DIY projects. I can't read schematics and don't have the ability to do troubleshooting or so...

Nevertheless i have a feeling that i can handle this project or am i wrong??

Is it possible that one can accomplish this project with very little knowledge about electronics?

Would be happy if someone say something about this..

thanks!

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Post by GryphonP3 » Sat Dec 03, 2016 8:27 am

intheocean wrote:Hi everyone,

This my first post here but i was following the some of the threads before.
I have a question about the building process of TTSH.

I love the sound of 2600 and desperately want one but I don't have any electricity knowledge, only effect pedals from Musikding and made some other DIY projects. I can't read schematics and don't have the ability to do troubleshooting or so...

Nevertheless i have a feeling that i can handle this project or am i wrong??

Is it possible that one can accomplish this project with very little knowledge about electronics?

Would be happy if someone say something about this..

thanks!
Anything is possible, but this is a huge first project that I would not recommend if you are not planning to make many mistakes along the way, spend a long time troubleshooting, and put a lot of hours into. You will learn a ton, however, and that can be valuable. My first real build was a CGS Serge panel with tons of changes to part values, hand wiring, and lots of digging through forums to help me out along the way. When I first turned it on, 3 out of 10 modules workes right away. The build took me forever, and the troubleshoot took me twice as long. But it taught me a lot about DIY electronics, which is why I built it in the first place. I would not choosw this as a first project unleas you are ready for things to go wrong, lots of frustration, possiblility of no success at all, and a large investment, both time wise and financially. If you accept all these things being realistic, then go for it! There are a lot of helpful people here and anything is possible. Be prepared though, problems can hide extremely well, and a single problem can make the entire synth out zero sound. I'd definitely get some chops with modules before going TTSH.
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Post by fuzzbass » Sat Dec 03, 2016 8:49 am

GryphonP3 wrote:
intheocean wrote:Hi everyone,

This my first post here but i was following the some of the threads before.
I have a question about the building process of TTSH.

I love the sound of 2600 and desperately want one but I don't have any electricity knowledge, only effect pedals from Musikding and made some other DIY projects. I can't read schematics and don't have the ability to do troubleshooting or so...

Nevertheless i have a feeling that i can handle this project or am i wrong??

Is it possible that one can accomplish this project with very little knowledge about electronics?

Would be happy if someone say something about this..

thanks!
Anything is possible, but this is a huge first project that I would not recommend if you are not planning to make many mistakes along the way, spend a long time troubleshooting, and put a lot of hours into. You will learn a ton, however, and that can be valuable. My first real build was a CGS Serge panel with tons of changes to part values, hand wiring, and lots of digging through forums to help me out along the way. When I first turned it on, 3 out of 10 modules workes right away. The build took me forever, and the troubleshoot took me twice as long. But it taught me a lot about DIY electronics, which is why I built it in the first place. I would not choosw this as a first project unleas you are ready for things to go wrong, lots of frustration, possiblility of no success at all, and a large investment, both time wise and financially. If you accept all these things being realistic, then go for it! There are a lot of helpful people here and anything is possible. Be prepared though, problems can hide extremely well, and a single problem can make the entire synth out zero sound. I'd definitely get some chops with modules before going TTSH.
What he said. My first DIY project was a complete synth from MFOS, the Soundlab Ultimate. I didn't have much in the way of troubleshooting skills going in, but by the time I was done, I had some fault finding chops. If you start this project without test/measurement equipment, you will have some when you are done. For example, this synth requires a whole bunch of matched transistor pairs. Unless you have a source for these, you might end up buying a 4.5 digit multi-meter to match them yourself. Experienced builders usually end up with a punch list at the end of the TTSH build. Only go down this road if you are the sort of person who will chip away at a problem until solved, because odds are you will have multiple problems to solve. Also, if your soldering skills are low, or if you have a cheapo iron, buy yourself extra examples of all the rare jfets in this build. These are easily destroyed by excessive heating, and many troubleshooting sub threads have led to these as root cause.
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Post by intheocean » Sat Dec 03, 2016 11:52 am

fuzzbass wrote:
GryphonP3 wrote:
intheocean wrote:Hi everyone,

This my first post here but i was following the some of the threads before.
I have a question about the building process of TTSH.

I love the sound of 2600 and desperately want one but I don't have any electricity knowledge, only effect pedals from Musikding and made some other DIY projects. I can't read schematics and don't have the ability to do troubleshooting or so...

Nevertheless i have a feeling that i can handle this project or am i wrong??

Is it possible that one can accomplish this project with very little knowledge about electronics?

Would be happy if someone say something about this..

thanks!
Anything is possible, but this is a huge first project that I would not recommend if you are not planning to make many mistakes along the way, spend a long time troubleshooting, and put a lot of hours into. You will learn a ton, however, and that can be valuable. My first real build was a CGS Serge panel with tons of changes to part values, hand wiring, and lots of digging through forums to help me out along the way. When I first turned it on, 3 out of 10 modules workes right away. The build took me forever, and the troubleshoot took me twice as long. But it taught me a lot about DIY electronics, which is why I built it in the first place. I would not choosw this as a first project unleas you are ready for things to go wrong, lots of frustration, possiblility of no success at all, and a large investment, both time wise and financially. If you accept all these things being realistic, then go for it! There are a lot of helpful people here and anything is possible. Be prepared though, problems can hide extremely well, and a single problem can make the entire synth out zero sound. I'd definitely get some chops with modules before going TTSH.
What he said. My first DIY project was a complete synth from MFOS, the Soundlab Ultimate. I didn't have much in the way of troubleshooting skills going in, but by the time I was done, I had some fault finding chops. If you start this project without test/measurement equipment, you will have some when you are done. For example, this synth requires a whole bunch of matched transistor pairs. Unless you have a source for these, you might end up buying a 4.5 digit multi-meter to match them yourself. Experienced builders usually end up with a punch list at the end of the TTSH build. Only go down this road if you are the sort of person who will chip away at a problem until solved, because odds are you will have multiple problems to solve. Also, if your soldering skills are low, or if you have a cheapo iron, buy yourself extra examples of all the rare jfets in this build. These are easily destroyed by excessive heating, and many troubleshooting sub threads have led to these as root cause.


I understand. There will be always problems no matter how much you are careful. Its also tricky enough for the experienced builders.. Maybe i can find someone who can help me building it, otherwise it would be a good decision to forget about it cause i can't risk lots of time and money. I'll make more research about it and make my final decision. Thanks for the replies, was really helpful.

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Post by n167tx » Sat Dec 03, 2016 5:04 pm

Go for it. will be worthy.

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Post by Conjure » Sat Dec 03, 2016 5:18 pm

I already bought 90% of the BOM, all rare/matched parts, reverb tank, speakers, etc. in anticipation.

Wondering how much the BOM will change in this revision. Im guessing mostly just the power section and now the filter.

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Post by yan6 » Sat Dec 03, 2016 7:11 pm

I say give it a go too. If you approach every step with caution and care you will be well on your way. I find the key with big builds is to break them into smaller builds. In this case each section/module at a time. And dont move on until the previous is fully working. You most often see fails when people try to ram all the components onto the board and figure it out later. Even for an experienced builder this will be a challage to debug.

You can certainyl get your feet wet with a transistor matching kit.

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Post by biftek » Sat Dec 03, 2016 7:14 pm

intheocean wrote:Nevertheless i have a feeling that i can handle this project or am i wrong??

Is it possible that one can accomplish this project with very little knowledge about electronics?
I say go for it. My first DIY project was a Mutable Instruments Ambika, and I have no regrets. :banana:

Just be sure to take your time, and double check values/orientation before soldering. Also buy spare parts when ordering the BOM.

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Post by fuzzbass » Sun Dec 04, 2016 6:23 am

intheocean wrote:Maybe i can find someone who can help me building it.
You already found them.

I wasn't trying to disabuse you of the notion of building a TTSH. I was just trying to rid you of the apprehension at debugging it. Build it and you will never again feel the need to preface your questions with "I'm a beginner...".
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Post by mOBiTh » Sun Dec 04, 2016 5:02 pm

I'm probably up for building some for people when time allows.

To intheocean I say: Buy the kit! But maybe buy some cheap modules to practice on first before actually building the kit.

That way you don't miss out and you don't fuck it up :hihi:

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Post by abelovesfun » Sun Dec 04, 2016 5:53 pm

Sorry - but I don't think you should. This is a very advanced project, and not something I would suggest. There are other DIY companies (*ahem, check the signature) that teach DIY to folks like you. I've built a fairly large euro and MOTM system, and even I had a few issues to fix with my V1 TTSH build. In addition to the huge amount of soldering and troubleshooting, there were also mechanical things to fix, like filing down the slider panels.

I hate to discourage you, but this is not something I could recommend for a beginner.
intheocean wrote:Hi everyone,

This my first post here but i was following the some of the threads before.
I have a question about the building process of TTSH.

I love the sound of 2600 and desperately want one but I don't have any electricity knowledge, only effect pedals from Musikding and made some other DIY projects. I can't read schematics and don't have the ability to do troubleshooting or so...

Nevertheless i have a feeling that i can handle this project or am i wrong??

Is it possible that one can accomplish this project with very little knowledge about electronics?

Would be happy if someone say something about this..

thanks!
Super Easy, Awesome DIY kits @ http://www.aisynthesis.com
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https://www.facebook.com/forcedamagemusic

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Post by Conjure » Sun Dec 04, 2016 6:53 pm

abelovesfun wrote:Sorry - but I don't think you should. This is a very advanced project, and not something I would suggest. There are other DIY companies (*ahem, check the signature) that teach DIY to folks like you. I've built a fairly large euro and MOTM system, and even I had a few issues to fix with my V1 TTSH build. In addition to the huge amount of soldering and troubleshooting, there were also mechanical things to fix, like filing down the slider panels.

I hate to discourage you, but this is not something I could recommend for a beginner.
intheocean wrote:Hi everyone,

This my first post here but i was following the some of the threads before.
I have a question about the building process of TTSH.

I love the sound of 2600 and desperately want one but I don't have any electricity knowledge, only effect pedals from Musikding and made some other DIY projects. I can't read schematics and don't have the ability to do troubleshooting or so...

Nevertheless i have a feeling that i can handle this project or am i wrong??

Is it possible that one can accomplish this project with very little knowledge about electronics?

Would be happy if someone say something about this..

thanks!
I agree. If you claim not to have any skill level, proper tools, proper troubleshooting capabilities, don't do it. When all is said and done, you're taking a ~$1700US (with case) gamble for something you'll almost guaranteed have to debug, and then calibrate correctly, etc.

Start small, learn as much as you can, then come back to this project later if it still interests you. If you don't know what you're doing and need it NOW, pay someone else to do it. That's why the service exists.

I'm all for DIY, but pick your battles per your skill level.

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Post by GryphonP3 » Sun Dec 04, 2016 7:31 pm

Conjure wrote:
abelovesfun wrote:Sorry - but I don't think you should. This is a very advanced project, and not something I would suggest. There are other DIY companies (*ahem, check the signature) that teach DIY to folks like you. I've built a fairly large euro and MOTM system, and even I had a few issues to fix with my V1 TTSH build. In addition to the huge amount of soldering and troubleshooting, there were also mechanical things to fix, like filing down the slider panels.

I hate to discourage you, but this is not something I could recommend for a beginner.
intheocean wrote:Hi everyone,

This my first post here but i was following the some of the threads before.
I have a question about the building process of TTSH.

I love the sound of 2600 and desperately want one but I don't have any electricity knowledge, only effect pedals from Musikding and made some other DIY projects. I can't read schematics and don't have the ability to do troubleshooting or so...

Nevertheless i have a feeling that i can handle this project or am i wrong??

Is it possible that one can accomplish this project with very little knowledge about electronics?

Would be happy if someone say something about this..

thanks!
I agree. If you claim not to have any skill level, proper tools, proper troubleshooting capabilities, don't do it. When all is said and done, you're taking a ~$1700US (with case) gamble for something you'll almost guaranteed have to debug, and then calibrate correctly, etc.

Start small, learn as much as you can, then come back to this project later if it still interests you. If you don't know what you're doing and need it NOW, pay someone else to do it. That's why the service exists.

I'm all for DIY, but pick your battles per your skill level.
Just to throw more wood on the fire, I have built over a hundred euro modulea, every module in the Haible lineup, 5 serge panels, 2x 208r easels, multiple Jaspers, Navas, and Yoctos, and I still find this project to be daunting. Doable, but daunting. If I had no chops, I would have a heart attack trying to figure out how parts worked and how problems occur within this build, while not even knowing how to solder properly. There are certain techniques and rules of thumb that you discover and build for yourself over your experience and time doing this stuff, and using those to avoid problems in the first place is a thousand times easier than making a mistake and then having to go back to find it later.

Make your mistakes on smaller cheaper boards, then bring what you've learned there to this table once you get there.
My cat can eat a whole watermelon ...

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Post by intheocean » Sun Dec 04, 2016 8:14 pm

Hey! I couldn't find someone yet :( i am trying to figure out calibration and matching transistors thing.. reading and searching a lot but that seems not easy at all. I don't understand the technical electricity terms. I am also searching for the proper tools or figure out what i need (osciloscope, multimeter, good soldering iron etc..). My soldering skills are not bad and i already started practicing again. I ordered a diy digital osciloscope which is called dso138 for practicing. And i have lots of questions. I think I'll buy the kit because i don't want to miss this.. don't know why but i always feel like i can succeed. But i also appreciate your advices because i can imagine how it can be puzzling. 5 years ago i did Mfos soundlab mini as my first diy project and i failed, remembering that was not easy but i learnt a lot from it.

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Post by sduck » Mon Dec 05, 2016 12:42 am

I can build these for folks if they want to order the kit and case and send it to me - I'll take care of the rest. I'm in Tennessee in the USA, and have built 6 of these from the previous batches.
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Post by Conjure » Wed Dec 07, 2016 10:40 pm

This is possibly a dumb question, but I plan on using hex nuts for the jacks on the panel. I don't want to use a metal driver to put these nuts on, and I don't want to cover it with electrical tape and all the other "tricks" for putting them on to not scratch the panel. All of those tricks have failed me at one time or another, and I want to make sure I get this right the first time.

Do they sell a plastic socket for nuts in these sizes? The goal is in not scratching the panel whatsoever.

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Post by sduck » Wed Dec 07, 2016 11:25 pm

Get a Klein Tools 5/16 nut driver. The expensive kind. You can find them at Home Depot. They have rounded, chrome plated ends and won't scratch up the finish. Trust me, I've used them on 6 TTSH builds and countless other things and they haven't scratched anything yet.
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Post by Conjure » Wed Dec 07, 2016 11:28 pm

sduck wrote:Get a Klein Tools 5/16 nut driver. The expensive kind. You can find them at Home Depot. They have rounded, chrome plated ends and won't scratch up the finish. Trust me, I've used them on 6 TTSH builds and countless other things and they haven't scratched anything yet.
Cool, thanks :) I'll take your word for it and grab one!

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Post by Chrutil » Thu Dec 08, 2016 12:49 am

Conjure wrote:
sduck wrote:Get a Klein Tools 5/16 nut driver. The expensive kind. You can find them at Home Depot. They have rounded, chrome plated ends and won't scratch up the finish. Trust me, I've used them on 6 TTSH builds and countless other things and they haven't scratched anything yet.
Cool, thanks :) I'll take your word for it and grab one!
Just take care when tightening those nuts, and do it lightly.
I pulled a nut a little bit too hard on my first build and funny things started happening until I loosened it up. Luckily it's been ok since, but that was a scary moment.
I think the panel night shorten something out if this happens in an unfortunate place.

C

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Post by ultravox » Thu Dec 08, 2016 1:07 am

I used Erthenvar 3.5mm washers under the nuts, which kept the socket off the panel. You can go this route if you want that extra bling.

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Post by Don T » Thu Dec 08, 2016 3:46 am

I wonder if the mistake in the noise generator has been corrected...

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Post by phisynth » Fri Dec 09, 2016 7:14 am

wondering if possible / doable / interesting to build it with banana's ? Has anybody done this ? I guess the normalizations + jack depth might be an issue...

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Post by thresholdpeople » Fri Dec 09, 2016 7:54 am

phisynth wrote:wondering if possible / doable / interesting to build it with banana's ? Has anybody done this ? I guess the normalizations + jack depth might be an issue...
It's theoretically possible, but it will be a nightmare if you want use the preexisting panel. Since every control and jack goes into the panel, you won't have a way to deal with where the slack in the wire from bananas go, also I'm not sure where you'd put the normaling switching.... suppose you can get rid of all the normalizing.

I'd say the only way to do it is to panel mount the faders, jacks, etc, and use wires to go the PCB which is mounted away from the panel.

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