How to make feedback/vocals on a live set

Discussing gear, production, and ideas for making noise music. Enough JMJ, let's rock like Merzbow!

Moderators: Joe., lisa, luketeaford, Kent

Post Reply
fradroemmen
Learning to Wiggle
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Aug 16, 2019 11:02 am
Location: Lisbon

How to make feedback/vocals on a live set

Post by fradroemmen » Fri Aug 16, 2019 11:18 am

First, I would like to disclose that I am a complete beginner on this matter.
I am doing my first gig as an electronic musician this weekend. I am playing some tracks and I would like to perform the vocals (distorted with delay) live and also make some real-time feedback noise. What kind of gear would it be required to do that? A mic>pedals>guitar amp? How do I connect the mic to the pedals/amp? How does the amp get to the PA? Is it possible to do that with the main mic from the venue (the one that goes straight to the PA)?
I have no idea how to do it. Any help would be appreciated.

User avatar
authorless
Super Deluxe Wiggler
Posts: 2280
Joined: Tue Feb 17, 2009 10:41 am
Location: Wilmington, NC

Post by authorless » Sun Aug 18, 2019 10:34 am

There are feedback pedals, not sure how they would work on vocals. They can be a lot more controlled and a lot less piercing than real feedback, but they can sound slightly not right. Whoever is running sound would be super not into you using their system for feedback, and the might have feedback suppressors that will make it not happen anyway. The crowd will also probably really not like actual feedback, too.
"Wait a month and buy from a fellow wiggler who's desperate for new modules." - Johnisfaster

"It's oscillators are so precise and lifeless it's actually a digital modelling analog synth." - nadafarms

Cotgrave
Learning to Wiggle
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2017 2:00 pm

Re: How to make feedback/vocals on a live set

Post by Cotgrave » Tue Aug 27, 2019 2:54 pm

fradroemmen wrote:First, I would like to disclose that I am a complete beginner on this matter.
I am doing my first gig as an electronic musician this weekend. I am playing some tracks and I would like to perform the vocals (distorted with delay) live and also make some real-time feedback noise. What kind of gear would it be required to do that? A mic>pedals>guitar amp? How do I connect the mic to the pedals/amp? How does the amp get to the PA? Is it possible to do that with the main mic from the venue (the one that goes straight to the PA)?
I have no idea how to do it. Any help would be appreciated.
this thread might be of some help to you.
authorless wrote:The crowd will also probably really not like actual feedback, too.
This is the NOISE section my dude. we LOVE feedback.

User avatar
Infinity Curve
Super Deluxe Wiggler
Posts: 1109
Joined: Tue Jul 15, 2014 11:29 am
Location: Toronto Canada

Post by Infinity Curve » Tue Aug 27, 2019 3:55 pm

get a mixer with sends, put some guitar pedals on one of the sends(distortions, delays, phasers, pitch shifters, etc.) - plug the output from the pedal chain into one of your mixer channels - turn up the send on that channel(the same send you have your pedals on)= controllable feedback

Mess with the EQ on the mixer and pedal settings to 'change' the sound.

If you want your vocals in the feedback loop too, just hook your mic into a channel on your mixer, and turn up the send from it on the feedback channel, et voila.

Takes some practice and familiarity to control it with any sense of what is going to happen, have fun and play with it

Technologear?
Wiggling with Experience
Posts: 307
Joined: Fri Aug 11, 2017 7:08 am
Location: Straya

Post by Technologear? » Thu Aug 29, 2019 9:26 am

+1 to the above answer. Wish I had known this approach when I was starting out.
Treat your mixer and fx as your instrument, not a means to an end.

Uncontrolled, impromptu and unplanned feedback in the typical upper frequency range is boring, annoying if it's perceived as significantly louder than the rest of the mix/music.
https://grime666.bandcamp.com/album/deteriorate as an example of feedback ruining something awesome. The relative volume of the feedback to the rest of the songs makes the songs sound quieter, weaker.

Controlled and planned feedback that isn't just the repeated same frequency range can be an awesome sonic weapon. Grab the eq knobs and shape a new reality. Or at least keep the feedback at an equal or lesser relative volume than other sounds.

Post Reply

Return to “Synth Noise”