Four records that changed your life.

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Gaetan
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Post by Gaetan » Fri Dec 21, 2018 1:36 am

In chronological order of my discoveries :
Daft Punk - Discovery : The first CD I bought as a teenager and the album which got me into music as a hobby. I keep finding new stuff in it to this day.
Rammstein - Mutter : One of my very first Metal albums, which got me into both Metal and Industrial and opened a world of unknown music to me. Listened to it on repeat for years. Still a masterpiece to this day.
Burzum - Filosofem : Introduced me to Black Metal, Doom Metal and Ambient at the same time. This album has an incredible atmosphere and still blows every similar work that has come since.
Silver Mt. Zion - Horses in the sky : This is just raw emotion. Incredibly powerful album and with many things to discover behind a seemingly simple facade.

Interestingly that means that I discovered all this between 2001 and 2006. So I haven't discovered anything that has marked me as much since. Sort of makes sense I guess, and since then it has more been a steady journey once the bases were covered.

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Post by naturligfunktion » Fri Dec 21, 2018 7:55 pm

Great question, hard to answer

Beatles - Abbey Road (great album)

Bob Marley - Legend (so boring but its true, before Bob I only listened to thrash metal, but then I got this, not even a proper album, but nevertheless everything changed. Bob Marley is the shit)

A Tribe Called Quest - Low end theory (introduced me to hiphop. Nowadays I find Midnight mauraders the superior record but thats how the cookie crumbles)

Bonobo - Black Sands (I dont listen to this at all any more, but Bonobo was my introduktion to electronic music and that changed a lot)

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Post by hsosdrum » Sat Dec 22, 2018 11:43 pm

It's kind of hard to boil down over 60 years of musical influences into just four albums, but each of these provided a unique and extremely powerful musical discovery for me. [Explanatory text added 6/10/20]

With the year in which I first heard each one:

Benny Goodman: The Complete 1938 Carnegie Hall Jazz Concert (1961)

This record allowed me to become a drummer. Earlier that year I had fallen in love with drums as physical objects, and listening to Gene Krupa's playing on this concert recording established a lifelong connection between me and drum music. Simply put, this is the most important recorded music I have ever heard in my entire life.

Gene Krupa & Buddy Rich: Krupa and Rich (1964)

After buying this album I began to deconstruct just how Gene Krupa and Buddy Rich approach music in their playing, and this provided a pathway for me to begin analyzing a musician's role within music. This is the record that launched me on my journey as a student of improvised music, particularly drum music.

Cream: Live Cream (1970, although I had seen Cream live in person twice in 1968)

Cream was the first rock band that showed how virtuosity could be a vital component of rock music's emotional content. This album displays all three players' virtuosity in collective improvisation the best of any of Cream's official releases. And if you have a good enough audio system (headphones need not apply — you have to hear it through a high-resolution/high-output speaker system) it's the recording that best conveys a sense of what it was like to see the band live when all three members were at the peak of their powers.

Mahavishnu Orchestra: The Inner Mounting Flame (1971)

This record applied what I wrote above about virtuosity in rock music to jazz/rock fusion, and upped the virtuosity ante by several orders of magnitude. Hearing this for the first time connected me with what seemed like an unlimited number of musical possibilities, removing any limitations that had been previously imposed upon improvised music. It was like being exposed to musical infinity for the first time.
Last edited by hsosdrum on Wed Jun 10, 2020 8:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by Flexyflier » Sun Dec 23, 2018 12:02 am

Black Sabbath- Sabbath bloody sabbath
Pink floyd- Dark side of the moon
Klaus Schulz-Timewind
Future sound of London-Lifeforms

Plus any FAX label stuff.
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Post by mousegarden » Sun Dec 23, 2018 7:26 am

Has anyone actually mentioned any of their own recordings as being landmarks, and favourites?

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Profound Albums ...

Post by Balrogk » Sun Dec 23, 2018 6:18 pm

Pink Floyd : Meddle
Arthur Brown and Kingdom Come: Galatic Zoo Dossier
VGG : H to HE Who am the Only one
T.S. McPhee : Two Sides of ... "The Hunt" ( ARP 2000 I believe)
Honorable Mention:

Edgar Frose since I bought "Aqua" LP (also own "Ages","Epsilon in Malaysian Pale", "Pheadra"
all 1st release in USA.Actually got to meet Edgar after a LA concert : )
all things Robert Fripp and Company
Frank Zappa
John Mayall "Bare Wires" haunts me for unknow reasons
Meddle totally changed the direction of my musical interest.the concept of 1 song taking the entire 2nd side.Besides the fact that it was Pink Floyd!!! I saw the "animal" "Division Bell" concerts live

SOOOOO many others that influenced me
(EDIT) OMG! NOT H to HE (I love Killer). It is .... drum roll ... Pawn Hearts! A Plague of Lighthouse Keepers . ain't no other like Peter Himmell, and he is still producing/touring
Last edited by Balrogk on Sun Dec 23, 2018 8:24 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by commodorejohn » Sun Dec 23, 2018 7:49 pm

Meddle is definitely my favorite Floyd album. "Echoes" is just breathtaking.
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Post by Pahat_Kengat » Sun Dec 30, 2018 9:10 am

I would split this into two lists: one for the most influential records in general, and another in terms of electronic music. And I'm going to do just that. :roll:

First one:

Combat Rock (The Clash): The desert island record for me. While some of the tracks on the album haven't grown with me, the deepest cuts remain as deep as ever, especially the B side from Atom Tan onwards. It's all about the somber and meditative tracks here.

Key track: Straight to Hell

Pahaa unta? (Se): Deeply touching and emotional music from the fascinating evolutionary middle stage between punk and post-punk. The lyrics are still some of the most touching and beautiful I've ever heard and definitely have gone through various interpretations since I was a sixteen year old gothy kid, but have always remained very relatable for some ten years of growing up.

Key track: Anna mun olla

Faith (The Cure): The wild card of this list. While my relationship with The Cure and Robert Smith has been a shifting one, I still find myself gravitating towards the atmosphere, ambience and aesthetic of this album more often than I thought I would. Definitely the ultimate goth record in the humble opinion of this (more or less...) ex-goth.

Key track: Faith

Laulu laakson kukista (Paavoharju): Hard to categorise in terms of pigeon holes, but there's hints of ambient, synth pop, folk and noise here, all mixed together with truly unique sensibility. But its the dream-like nature of the album that really does it for me. An absolute sonic gem.

Key track: Tuoksu tarttuu meihin

Second one:

Neu! (Neu!): I think this is the record that has inspired me the most in terms of what electronic music can be: the static state of the music and the use of drones, the delicate production in which every sound simply breathes, the use of found ambient sounds, the minimalism, etc. This album simply changed the way I see and hear music on a much broader level.

Key track: Im Glück

This Heat (This Heat): Easily the darkest album on this list. Sharing many qualities with Neu!'s first album, this album also changed the way I perceive music, but in slightly different ways. The brooding use of silence, the dissonant drones and the general sense of fright this album stirs up is just simply fascinating to me.

Key track: Not Waving

Cluster II / Sowiesoso (Cluster): A hard pick between two very different but equally inspiring albums. One dark and droning, the other blissful and melodic. So I just decided to pick both!

Key tracks: Für die Katz' / Zum wohl

Musik von Harmonia (Harmonia): Not a big surprise that this list concludes with Harmonia, an ambient "super group" with members from both Neu! and Cluster. While it is a starkly more lo-fi album in terms of production when compared to Conny Plank produced Sowiesoso and Neu!, it still evokes the same sense of glimmer and radiance of a warm summer's day. Melodies play and entwine with one another, and the musical scenery changes and alters as naturally as the course of running water. A truly beautiful and blissful album.

Key track: Sehr kosmisch

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Post by naturligfunktion » Thu Jan 03, 2019 3:58 am

mousegarden wrote:Has anyone actually mentioned any of their own recordings as being landmarks, and favourites?
Great question! I did not, and now I wonder why hehe

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Post by houndington » Wed Jan 09, 2019 4:22 pm

Nine Inch Nails - Pretty Hate Machine - It was 1992, I was thirteen and into Guns N Roses. This album blew my mind and redefined what music could be for me. It was the start of a lifelong obsession with industrial and synthetic sounds.

Monolake - Static - fast forwarding to 1999, I'd been into Detroit techno and the London tech-house scene for a couple of years. A friend played me this record one day and opened up a whole new world of dub-influenced electronic sounds. This led me on to Basic Channel, Rhythm and Sound, Vladislav Delat and associated artists that I still listen to regularly.

Luomo - Vocalcity - After a deep dive into the dub-techno scene, this rekindled my interest in house music, though it's a long way from what you'd traditionally call house :D

Fockewulf 190 - Body Heat - My gateway into Italo, and the start of a real synth obsession

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Post by forestcaver » Wed Jan 09, 2019 4:27 pm

X Ray Spex - Germfree Adolescents
The Cure - Faith
Stiff Little Fingers - Inflammable Material
New Model Army - Ghost of Cain

(And a bonus record that I cant leave off)
Dead Kennedys - Fresh Fruit For Rotting Vegetables

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Post by Fallen_lassen » Wed Jan 09, 2019 6:45 pm

My bloody valentine loveless. ( Because It changed the world)
The cure pornography. ( because i was young )
Spectrum highs lows and heavenly blows. ( because it is my ketamine music)
John coltrane my favorite things. ( beacause its one of my favorite things)

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Post by mome rath » Wed Jan 09, 2019 7:21 pm

4 (+1) for 1998/1999ish me:
orbital - brown album
download - III (and) the eyes of stanley pain; tie
cabaret voltaire - the conversation
NIN - downward spiral
front line assembly - hardwired

4 (+1) albums very important for the "now" me
cranberries - everybody else is doing it...
nothing - dance on the blacktop
bell witch - four phantoms
shape of despair - monotony fields
wolves in the throne room - thrice woven
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basically, as the dude put it "no walter, youre not wrong, youre just an asshole".
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Post by mome rath » Wed Jan 09, 2019 7:27 pm

edit: woops, 2 posts for the price of 1
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Fri Jan 03, 2020 2:45 pm
basically, as the dude put it "no walter, youre not wrong, youre just an asshole".
zoogoo wrote: your stupid

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Post by 1986Bowler » Sun Feb 10, 2019 7:57 pm

Okay:

Weird Al Yankovic- Weird Al Yankovic-- he took popular songs and played them on an ACCORDIAN, and they still sounded cool, but now they were funny.

Pink Floyd- The Wall-- Given to me as a teenage by my buddy in order to "expand my mind"-'nuff said.

The Beatles- Rock N Roll Music-- this 8-track was just left running in my Grandparents' basement. Not a dud on there.

Boney M- Nightflight to Venus-- it has the Cylon Vocoder voice, and synth music up the wazoo.

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Post by Dr. Sketch-n-Etch » Mon Feb 11, 2019 1:38 am

mome rath wrote:4 (+1) for 1998/1999ish me:
orbital - brown album
download - III (and) the eyes of stanley pain; tie
cabaret voltaire - the conversation
NIN - downward spiral
front line assembly - hardwired

4 (+1) albums very important for the "now" me
cranberries - everybody else is doing it...
nothing - dance on the blacktop
bell witch - four phantoms
shape of despair - monotony fields
wolves in the throne room - thrice woven
When it comes to music, the "now" me is much the same as the 1998/1999ish me I fear. My tastes haven't really changed at all in 20 years, or even 30 or 40 years. When I was in middle school, my best friend Troy and I wore out the first Toto album, which came out when I was 13. I have been listening to that same album more or less constantly for the last month, and I'm 54 now. It has been on constant rotation at my workbench for the last week -- I've listened to nothing else while working on my massive handmade Rubicon-2 project.
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Post by onthebandwagon » Mon Feb 11, 2019 10:07 am

sowiesoso

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Post by Idunno » Wed Feb 13, 2019 7:03 pm

Diamonds Are Forever - John Barry

I’d enjoyed much music before hearing this, but it was the first tune that really opened up the musical parts of my brain. I started collecting records after this. Mainly film soundtracks, John Barry, Ennio Morricone, Bernard Herrmann, etc, etc.

Nowhere Man EP - The Beatles

Coupled with the Red and Blue albums, this is what started me obsessively listening to rock and pop music and made me want to be in a band. I didn’t play any instrument at the time though.

The Beatles (White Album) - The Beatles

On hearing this I realised that any style of music was a viable listening experience and I didn’t have to be tied down to any factional music tribe identity (although I’ve tried a few). Indeed, my musical tastes are about as eclectic as anyone I know.

The Velvet Underground & Nico / White Light White Heat

A compilation cassette of the first two Velvet Underground albums. After hearing this I’d discovered what kind of band I wanted to be in. I’d already been playing guitar and bass a few years by then and trying out with a few bands but had never quite settled into anything.


Also a nod to Bill Monroe, Earl Scruggs and the Stanley Brothers as I’m a big Bluegrass fan.

Here’s Earl jammin’ with a Moog in 1972.



My first forum post btw. Hello to all.

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Post by snercle » Wed Feb 13, 2019 7:18 pm

Pixies - Surfer Rosa

Bob Marley & the wailers - Exodus

King Crimson - Discipline

Eels - Electro shock blues

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Post by Dr. Sketch-n-Etch » Thu Feb 14, 2019 3:01 pm

What if you had to escape with your life, and you could only take one album... what would it be?

For me, I wouldn't have to think twice. Tales from Topographic Oceans by Yes.
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Post by commodorejohn » Thu Feb 14, 2019 9:25 pm

Close to the Edge.
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Post by wiggies » Thu Feb 14, 2019 10:32 pm

Patti Smith--Horses
Television--Marquee Moon
Ultravox--Systems of Romance
Chrome--Half Machine Lips Move

The late 70s ...

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Post by Tun » Mon Apr 15, 2019 2:03 am

In chronological order of me hearing them, these are the records that really inspired me and ultimately led me to releasing music commercially around the start of the 90's. I'm 50 in a few days and making music is still my passion and will remain so.

Of course, I could have chosen to list my own releases as they certainly changed my life in terms of financial ups and downs, the choices I made later in life, and opportunities I would otherwise never have experienced. However, I don't want to go down that route as I'm not particularly proud of anything I've done.... so here goes:

Tangerine Dream - Force Majeure: 1981. 12 years of age and my growing record collection consisted mainly of Led Zeppelin and Rush. This album switched me on to electronic music and basically set the course for the rest of my life. The swirling, haunting intro breaking into those ascending piano chords and lead guitar, omfg. Nearly 40 years have passed and it still sends shivers down my spine, I've got to be in the mood though!

JMJ - Equinoxe: Still 12 years of age, having heard Force Majeure first, then listening to this a week or so later, Equinoxe sounded much more complex and obviously in parts it is very melodic. It helped me to intuitively understand what a sequencer is. Equinoxe sounded 'next level' to me in 1981 (music for interstellar space travel) and imho is still one of the best albums of all time.

Yello - 80-85 the new mix in one go: Boris Blank was way ahead of his time (their huge wealth obviously helped though). This album really turned me onto sampling and amazing production values.

Propaganda - Secret Wish: The ultimate album for me; awesome production - the apex of 80s electronic music just before the technology became cheaper and accessible to the masses. Steve Lipson, omfg, pure genius. Dream Within a Dream is one of my favourite tracks of all time. Played loud on a high end system it literally brings me to tears. If I ever produce anything 1% as good as this I'll die happy!
Last edited by Tun on Tue May 21, 2019 10:06 pm, edited 3 times in total.

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Post by VM » Mon Apr 15, 2019 4:06 am

Frank Zappa - Joe's Garage - My dad got me into this when I was about 16 or 17, and was probably my first introduction to a true "concept-album" that told a cohesive story throughout. Almost goes without saying for a Zappa album, but is a masterclass in musical arrangement and performance. Still listen to it regularly.

ISIS - Panopticon - opened my eyes to new ways of being heavy without sacrificing texture, tone and melody.

Killswitch Engage - Alive or Just Breathing - my guitar teacher got me into this when I was about 16. Pushed me into the world of metal. Still holds up today as one of the best metal albums of the decade and probably THE most influencial, apart from maybe Jane Doe.

Silverchair - Diorama - everyone thinks they know this album because they heard Greatest View on the radio or if After All These Years was their graduation song. Forget that. This thing is so much more. Silverchair took the right lessons from Neon Ballroom and went fucking HAM on the next one. Diorama is a flawless clinic in 'baroque-pop' and alt-pop; the arrangements are intricate and whimsical without being masturbatory; Johns' vocal performances and lyricism belong in a rock music hall of fame; the guitar tones go from shimmering bliss to sludge-crusted filth without batting an eyelid. Probably the best Australian rock album of the 21st century and the most underappreciated despite winning an ARIA (for what that's worth).

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Post by Idunno » Mon Apr 15, 2019 8:02 am

VM wrote:Frank Zappa - Joe's Garage - My dad got me into this when I was about 16 or 17, and was probably my first introduction to a true "concept-album" that told a cohesive story throughout. Almost goes without saying for a Zappa album, but is a masterclass in musical arrangement and performance. Still listen to it regularly.

ISIS - Panopticon - opened my eyes to new ways of being heavy without sacrificing texture, tone and melody.

Killswitch Engage - Alive or Just Breathing - my guitar teacher got me into this when I was about 16. Pushed me into the world of metal. Still holds up today as one of the best metal albums of the decade and probably THE most influencial, apart from maybe Jane Doe.

Silverchair - Diorama - everyone thinks they know this album because they heard Greatest View on the radio or if After All These Years was their graduation song. Forget that. This thing is so much more. Silverchair took the right lessons from Neon Ballroom and went fucking HAM on the next one. Diorama is a flawless clinic in 'baroque-pop' and alt-pop; the arrangements are intricate and whimsical without being masturbatory; Johns' vocal performances and lyricism belong in a rock music hall of fame; the guitar tones go from shimmering bliss to sludge-crusted filth without batting an eyelid. Probably the best Australian rock album of the 21st century and the most underappreciated despite winning an ARIA (for what that's worth).
I wasn't interested in Zappa until a friend persuaded me to go see him at the Hammersmith Odeon on the Joe's Garage tour in 1984. Simply amazing. What a band. I've been told that he gave out the running order of the set list to the band immediately prior to them going on stage and that the band would have to improvise segways from one song to another thoughout the set. You'd never have known it. Flawless.

Still not a huge Zappa fan, I prefer his compadre Capt Beefheart (the Mirror Man Sessions album could easily have graced my earlier list), but Hot Rats and Joe's Garage are really great albums.

I've never heard of the other bands you mention, despite being vaguely enough of a Metal fan, or so I thought. Must be getting old. Metal still means Black Sabbath to me.

.
Last edited by Idunno on Tue Apr 16, 2019 2:12 am, edited 1 time in total.

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