Four records that changed your life.

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Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
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Post by Dr. Sketch-n-Etch » Mon Apr 15, 2019 10:24 pm

Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:What if you had to escape with your life, and you could only take one album... what would it be?

For me, I wouldn't have to think twice. Tales from Topographic Oceans by Yes.
I think I may have to amend my answer. I wouldn't want to live in a world without that album for sure, but if I were escaping the apocalypse with just one album right this minute, I'd probably grab Eli and the Thirteenth Confession by Laura Nyro.
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probotector
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Post by probotector » Sun Apr 28, 2019 11:21 am

Only One!:

Image - THEME SONG

Changed my life... Also available as record :deadbanana:


OH wait, also the Bret Human Art - Intro Song:

Image

Changed my life.

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probotector
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Post by probotector » Wed May 01, 2019 3:55 am

Eh, that aside, honestly these are my four, chronologically:

Peter, Paul and Mary - Some Best of (with Puff the magic dragon, and such)
Daft Punk - Discovery
White Stripes - Elephant
Notwist - Shrink

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Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
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Post by Dr. Sketch-n-Etch » Tue May 07, 2019 1:39 pm

It's not all that common for an album to "change my life" at the age of 54. However, two albums have done just that. (You already know the answer...) Those two albums are:

Laura Nyro: Eli and the Thirteenth Confession (1968)

Laura Nyro: New York Tendaberry (1969)

I am totally and completely addicted to both. I can't go a single day without hearing both of them at least once. New York Tendaberry is also my current favorite song.
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Post by Rex Coil 7 » Tue May 07, 2019 2:03 pm

ELP's first album (I bought it in 1971 for my 11th birthday).

Rush - Moving Pictures.

Robin Trower - Bridge of Sighs.

Kansas - Two For The Show.
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vanadl138
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Post by vanadl138 » Tue May 07, 2019 2:52 pm

Atom and His Package - Making Love
Frank Zappa - Apostrophe
Mr Bungle - Disco Volante (or California)
Blindoldfreak - 1

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hemeroscopium
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Post by hemeroscopium » Fri May 10, 2019 9:10 am

Rashad Becker - Traditional Music of Notional Species - made me want to make music.

Meredith Monk - Atlas - Every time i hear it, i want to get better at writing/composing. Its pure genius in pristine form.

Steve Reich - New York Counterpoint, Eight Lines, Four Organs - most relaxing album on the planet, at least for me. Changes my life to bliss every time something is wrong. Healing music.

Boards of Canada - Music has the right to children - my introduction to electronic music, and still a classic.

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Post by Rex Coil 7 » Fri May 10, 2019 9:41 am

(Volume II of my list) ...

** UK - "Danger Money" (simply outstanding album).
** Pat Travers - "Go for what you know".
** Tommy Bolin - "Teaser".
** Fripp and Eno - "No Pussyfooting".



(Volume III)

** Pink Floyd - "Animals".
** Red Rider - "Neruda.
** Cheap Trick - "Heaven Tonight".
** Starcastle - "Fountains of Light".


~FIN~

:pbear:
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Post by terrymccann » Sat May 11, 2019 5:07 am

A couple from my childhood that I don't listen to anymore:

The Prodigy - The Fat of the Land
Eminem - The Marshall Mathers LP

And a couple from later on that I still like today:

Interpol - Turn on the Bright Lights
Burial - Untrue

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Post by UVB275 » Mon May 13, 2019 12:25 pm

Amnesiac - Radiohead - was definitely an awakening for me when it came to electronic music and using modular, before this I only listened to alt rock and country/folk.

D.o.A. The Third And Final Report - Throbbing Gristle - Introduced me to noise music and the industrial movement, their best album in my opinion.

The Secret Cosmic Music Of The East German Olympic Program 1972 - 83 Volume 3 - Kosmischer Läufer - Inspired me to want to make instrumental synthesiser music as well as being my first experience of krautrock, despite it being (probably;) ) a modern revival of the genre.

Multi-Task - Omni - Just an all round brilliant record start to finish, for me the best post punk revival since the death of the original genre.

Feel free to pm me if you know of any records similar to these, I am always trying to expand my musical horizons and would be happy to discuss music and give my own recommendations.

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Post by powertran » Fri May 17, 2019 6:01 pm

1. Never mind the bollocks here are the sex pistols - sex pistols
2. Closer - Joy Division
3. Radioactive - kraftwerk
4. Rossz Csillag Alatt Született - Venetian Snares.

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JimY
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Post by JimY » Sat May 18, 2019 3:47 am

I can't do it in 4!
But,
Roxy Music - For your pleasure.
Can - Tago Mago.
The Stranglers - Ratus Norvegicus.
NiN - the Quake soundtrack.

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tehyar
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Post by tehyar » Sat May 18, 2019 8:34 pm

David Bowie - The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars
Nirvana - Nevermind
NiN - The Downward Spiral
Death Cab For Cutie - Plans

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Post by lilnoah95 » Tue Jul 23, 2019 10:21 pm

throbbing gristle - 20 jazz funk greats
50 foot hose - cauldron
enya - best of
Lizzy mercier descloux - mambo nassau

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Post by cptnal » Wed Jul 24, 2019 4:55 am

Life-changing is a lot of responsibility to pin on an album. Can't honestly think of any, but I do have a very clear recollection of the first time I heard My Life in the Bush of Ghosts (around mid-eighties by the time it reached my ears) and thinking someone else was making the music I heard in my head, and that it was OK to do that. I guess that's probably life-changing... :hmm:

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Post by Fog Door » Wed Jul 24, 2019 6:47 am

My Life in the Bush of Ghosts
Amazing record :tu:

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Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
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Post by Dr. Sketch-n-Etch » Wed Jul 24, 2019 9:47 am

cptnal wrote:Life-changing is a lot of responsibility to pin on an album. Can't honestly think of any, but I do have a very clear recollection of the first time I heard My Life in the Bush of Ghosts (around mid-eighties by the time it reached my ears) and thinking someone else was making the music I heard in my head, and that it was OK to do that. I guess that's probably life-changing... :hmm:
This response has got me thinking about what albums actually changed my life, and how. In fact, there are many more than four. Just how do such albums "change ones life?"

The first album I can think of that "changed my life" was probably Yessongs. I had fallen over for the Roundabout single, and was actually too young to be buying albums (I was about 8 years old, and had no money, and this was the early 70s so there was no internet, etc, and the nearest record store was 50 miles away). A son in the family we had holiday dinners with gave me Yessongs because his tastes had moved on. For me, that was like being given the golden tablets of Hermes Trismegistus. I pored over them, I wore them out, I memorized them, and it led to a lifetime of appreciation for rock music that was more than three chords and yeah yeah yeah.

In college, we were picking up some people for a day out at the river, and when we got to their house, there was this incredible music playing. I was spell bound. I asked what it was, and was told Visions of the Emerald Beyond by the Mahavishnu Orchestra. This started a lifetime love of, first, jazz rock fusion, and then, just jazz in all its forms.

Later in college (maybe grad school), I was looking for interesting music to play on the piano, and was scanning the spines of "modern" piano scores at the university library. I came across this one by a composer with a weird name of which I had never heard: "Messiaen." It was Vingt Regards sur l'Enfant-Jesus. I had a quick look, and it looked very exotic on the printed page. A few days later, after trying to pick through a few of the pieces, I went to the university record collection and found a recording by the pianist John Ogdon. Mind... blown. That started a lifetime of appreciation for all things Messiaen, and of 20th and 21st century "serious" music in general.

For me, if an album causes a lifetime of different musical choices, that's a life-changer.
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cretaceousear
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Post by cretaceousear » Wed Jul 24, 2019 10:25 am

I wonder how many of us had parents who enjoyed music a lot?
My dad played piano very well, would improvise 30's cocktail jazz, Rachmaninov and the classics. He loved Wagner too.
But he also sat and watched a Stockhausen TV prog with me and asked to hear some of my records (I chose bits of Ummagumma and Faust).
Siblings who play their records to you - communal record players at school - can't help thinking it was a golden age for music.

But Doc.. YesSongs at 8 is very impressive.
..the vessel was heavier because “dead sheep do not have the same weight as the live ones”

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Post by Dr. Sketch-n-Etch » Wed Jul 24, 2019 11:13 am

cretaceousear wrote:I wonder how many of us had parents who enjoyed music a lot?
My dad played piano very well, would improvise 30's cocktail jazz, Rachmaninov and the classics. He loved Wagner too.
But he also sat and watched a Stockhausen TV prog with me and asked to hear some of my records (I chose bits of Ummagumma and Faust).
Siblings who play their records to you - communal record players at school - can't help thinking it was a golden age for music.

But Doc.. YesSongs at 8 is very impressive.
Well, I might have been 11. As it happens, Yessongs didn't come out until I was 9. It was probably 1975 or 6. However, I was 8 when I first heard Roundabout, and bought the 45rpm single (at Gemco in Sacramento, CA).
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Post by murch33 » Thu Aug 08, 2019 9:06 am

Life changing, hmmmm...

NIN - The Downward Spiral
Isis - Oceanic
Grails - The Burden of Hope
Tim Hecker - Harmony in Ultraviolet

There are plenty of others, but these all heavily influenced the musical paths I’ve taken.

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Post by hsosdrum » Thu Aug 08, 2019 6:46 pm

cretaceousear wrote:I wonder how many of us had parents who enjoyed music a lot?
My folks loved music — the two things that you would always hear in our house when I was growing up were music and L.A. Dodger baseball games.

Every Saturday morning at 10am my mom would listen to the live broadcast of the Metropolitan Opera's Saturday matinee performance (on AM radio) along with a program of swing music called "The Swingin' Years". On weekend afternoons we would listen to middle-eastern music and Arabic music on a mono FM station (this was before stereo FM broadcasting). On Saturday evenings the FM radio frequently played American folk music. Sunday afternoons was dixieland jazz. And of course, we listened to lots of rock'n'roll on AM radio (L.A. stations 93 KHJ and 1110 KRLA).

And my folks had an extensive record collection: popular music from Artie Shaw, Benny Goodman, Count Basie, the Mills Brothers and Spike Jones through Elvis Presley, Chuck Berry and Perry Como; classical music including Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninoff, Beethoven and opera; traditional Jewish folk songs; comedy albums by Carl Reiner & Mel Brooks, Belle Barth and Lenny Bruce. I started buying my own records when I was 9 years old ("Let There Be Drums" by Sandy Nelson in 1961).

In fact, buying that record led to a seminal moment in my life. When we got home with it Pop played it on his big hi-fi system. While we were all listening to it Pop turned to my mother and said "Whad'ya think — is he ready for "Sing, Sing, Sing?" Mom said "sure", so Pop put on Benny Goodman's 1938 Carnegie Hall Jazz Concert version of "Sing, Sing, Sing" and that moment absolutely cemented my self-identity as a drummer.

All that music stuck with me throughout my whole life (except the opera — not enough drums).

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cretaceousear
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Post by cretaceousear » Fri Aug 09, 2019 3:44 am

Great post hsodrum - cool parents!
..the vessel was heavier because “dead sheep do not have the same weight as the live ones”

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Post by scuto » Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:02 pm

Of course a difficult exercise, and I'm definitely omitting/missing important ones...

Rockers Soundtrack (My parents played reggae among other things during my childhood. All covers of "Police and Thieves" should be unceremoniously destroyed.)

Steve Reich - Early Works ("It's Gonna Rain" did my adolescent head in. My dad had the tape lying around.)

NIN - The Downward Spiral (The lyrics are tedious at best, but that music, that production! Formative.)

Penguin Cafe Orchestra - Signs of Life (Another one my parents played when I was growing up. Relatively their darkest record, and so many highlights for me. Each track is its own world. I respect Jeffes' son for trying to revive the feeling, but the non-Orchestra is too polished, not loose enough, and too self-conscious about what it's doing.)


Bonus, since if I'm honest I can't omit any of the above, but can't deny the importance of the following:
Eliane Radigue - Trilogie de la Mort (It showed me that what I liked about other music was the drone, implied or overt. It showed me what was possible, and sparked my creativity like nothing else before.)

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hsosdrum
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Post by hsosdrum » Sat Aug 10, 2019 6:25 pm

cretaceousear wrote:Great post hsodrum - cool parents!
Thanks cretaceousear. They were indeed — WAY cooler than I ever turned out to be. :tu:

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Post by Dr. Sketch-n-Etch » Mon Aug 12, 2019 1:12 pm

cretaceousear wrote:I wonder how many of us had parents who enjoyed music a lot?
My mom hated music. She said it made her nervous. This, in spite of the fact that she played the piano beautifully, which I heard her do maybe three times my entire childhood, even though we had a piano in the living room.

My dad loved music, mostly country. He really liked Glen Campbell. I inherited his beloved 1954 Martin 0018, which I still play (in fact, I had it reworked by legendary Vancouver guitar tech Paul Iverson, and it is absolutely sumptuous and practically plays itself). He bought it new when he was 26.

When I was about 9, I got my first guitar -- some cheapy electric. I remember playing around on it, and my dad saying to me that I should try playing melodies across the neck rather than all on one string, which is what I was doing. Sage advice. I struggled with the guitar my whole life, and then just in the last few years, it seems to have become very easy -- maybe it is one more side effect of my stroke a few years ago. :despair:
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