Finally appreciating Classical

Discuss the music that you love to hear.

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onthebandwagon
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Finally appreciating Classical

Post by onthebandwagon » Mon Oct 21, 2019 12:07 pm

Despite being exposed to classical music at a young age I somehow (or maybe because of) was never able to derive much enjoyment out of listening to it. Anyway, after hearing a lute piece by Vivaldi on the radio the other day I have been very much enjoying his Lute Concerto. Does anyone have a recommendation where I should listen next?
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kcd06
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Post by kcd06 » Mon Oct 21, 2019 8:02 pm

Respighi, Pines and Fountains of Rome

Dvorak, New World Symphony

Mussogorsky, Night on Bald Mountain



I used to include Carmina Burana in lists like this, but then I found out the composer was an enthusiastic Nazi and avoid it.
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Re: Finally appreciating Classical

Post by GuyaGuy » Mon Oct 21, 2019 11:11 pm

onthebandwagon wrote:Despite being exposed to classical music at a young age I somehow (or maybe because of) was never able to derive much enjoyment out of listening to it. Anyway, after hearing a lute piece by Vivaldi on the radio the other day I have been very much enjoying his Lute Concerto. Does anyone have a recommendation where I should listen next?
Well there are hundreds of years of music to choose from... :hihi:

Bach would be a logical follow up. Check out his lute suites, cello suites, and viola da gamba sonatas.

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Post by onthebandwagon » Mon Oct 21, 2019 11:21 pm

Yea I realize but that’s why I was asking, I feel like I use to see classical music as this sort of monolith where if you didn’t like one piece you automatically assume you wouldn’t care for something entirely different by virtue of also being classical music. My girlfriend recommended Brahm’s 4 Symphonien, and while beautiful, I don’t respond to it in the same way of the Vilvadi lute stuff. Anyway I certainly will check out the above recommendations.
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Post by OIP » Mon Oct 21, 2019 11:23 pm

chopin!

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Post by cptnal » Tue Oct 22, 2019 3:19 am

If you liked the Vivaldi lute stuff, check out his cello sonatas. I enjoyed Peter Wispelwey's recording.

Whether you like a piece of music is going to be a personal thing, so I'd recommend doing a bit of research on the formal side of things. You can choose to let the music wash over you and appreciate it in terms of its tone melody and so on, and that's absolutely fine. But it helps a lot in getting into a piece of music if you understand the template the composer is working to. For instance Haydn is great for understanding sonata form.

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Post by Moerder » Tue Oct 22, 2019 5:17 am

it's Mussorgsky. I second Dvořák and will add Bedrich Smetana's Moldau as recommendation, both brilliant Czech composers. The Moldau in particular has always moved me. another one which I'm sure you'd have heard is Clair de Lune by Claude Debussy, just lovely, his other works as well of course.

on a side note, I'd avoid discarding creators of music purely based on their endorsing or having been endorsed by whichever ideology. we mostly have little knowledge of such things the further back you go, and chances are people then had some troubling opinions, too, we just don't know it. Orff's works are, regardless of his failings, still enjoyed by many. and that was the original point here, right?

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Post by drift » Tue Oct 22, 2019 6:59 am

kcd06 wrote:
I used to include Carmina Burana in lists like this, but then I found out the composer was an enthusiastic Nazi and avoid it.
Realclearhistory.com:

A quarter Jewish, he never joined the Nazi Party and made an effort to stay out of politics. But he was an opportunist who prospered from Nazi patronage. We cannot know for sure whether he intentionally pandered to Nazi aesthetics, but it’s hardly a coincidence that Carmina Burana became the Third Reich’s model artwork, and Orff was happy to receive the money and praise. He was neither hero nor villain, and the morals of his music are likewise hazy.

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Post by Gyroscope » Tue Oct 22, 2019 8:54 am

I too can't really enjoy classical music. I often find it too soft/polite/cliché. Because of this I don't know a lot on this subject (and I know I must be missing lots of great works) but the one piece that I really enjoy is Rite of Spring from Stravinsky. Heavy stuff :sb:

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Post by Umcorps » Tue Oct 22, 2019 11:24 am

Well, being as you're here on Muffs it would be rude not to recommend trying Messiaen's Turangalila Symphony? Massive work for a massive orchestra with a starring role for the Ondes Martinot.

Try the 6th movement - warm evening shade with birdsong on the piano part. Starts at 39' 22"

[video][/video]

Nice video with decent shots of those resonators for the Ondes....

If you're liking Vivaldi, seek out some of his smaller chamber works. I really like some of the recorder concertii, especially when played in the style of and on instruments of the period. Also Telemann.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VS36O5gFZQc

And, again, cos its Muff's, I can't not recommend Cage's Sonatas for Prepared Piano.

[video][/video]

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Post by cretaceousear » Tue Oct 22, 2019 6:11 pm

Interesting thread - kinda the same myself - parents were fans and my Dad played piano really well - they liked opera too which mostly drives me mad.
I like plenty of classical but I hardly play it unless flipping radio stations while driving. I used to bully my kids to guess when pieces were written - probably put them off for life.
And yeah it's still a bit of a monolith.

So thanks to this thread I just listened to the Cage pieces, some Brahms, then a bit of Rachmaninov and now two Wagner overtures.
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Post by doublestewart » Tue Oct 22, 2019 6:38 pm

I am partial to Krzysztof Penderecki. Threnody to the Victims of Hiroshima is probably his most famous work.

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Re: Finally appreciating Classical

Post by spinach_pizza » Wed Oct 23, 2019 9:17 am

onthebandwagon wrote:Despite being exposed to classical music at a young age I somehow (or maybe because of) was never able to derive much enjoyment out of listening to it. Anyway, after hearing a lute piece by Vivaldi on the radio the other day I have been very much enjoying his Lute Concerto. Does anyone have a recommendation where I should listen next?
If you enjoy Vivaldi's Lute concerto, perhaps more lute music would interest you? I like the music from an earlier period. This is a nice collection:

Early Venetian Lute Music

Also, I truly love the sound of the ensemble Skip Sempé has put together (Capriccio Stravagante Renaissance Orchestra):

[video][/video]

The topic of "classical music" is huge, with entire universes to explore.

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Post by Slothrop » Wed Oct 23, 2019 9:49 am

I have to admit, some of the replies to this thread are a bit like if someone had said "hey, I've never really liked rock music but I've recently got quite into the Yardbirds and the Animals - what else should I check out?" and someone else came back with "yeah, you should definitely check out Deicide and Meshuggah, they're awesome..."

I mean, the OP totally should listen to Penderecki and Messiaen and Cage because they're great, but in terms of "if you like that, you might like this", Bach, Telemann and other Baroque / early Classical stuff might be the more obvious place to start

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Post by doublestewart » Wed Oct 23, 2019 1:27 pm

Slothrop wrote:I have to admit, some of the replies to this thread are a bit like if someone had said "hey, I've never really liked rock music but I've recently got quite into the Yardbirds and the Animals - what else should I check out?" and someone else came back with "yeah, you should definitely check out Deicide and Meshuggah, they're awesome..."

I mean, the OP totally should listen to Penderecki and Messiaen and Cage because they're great, but in terms of "if you like that, you might like this", Bach, Telemann and other Baroque / early Classical stuff might be the more obvious place to start
I think lots of the more closely linked composers such as Bach were suggested first. But considering the nature of these forums, I think the 20th century composers suggested are completely valid as they have ties to early electronic music and have had strong influences on lots of electronic artists.

With that in mind a contemporary name you might want to look at is Oliver Coates. He's a celloist who's contributed to lots of great music (Radiohead, Under The Skin) and has put out a couple solo albums that are heavily electronic, but also sprinkles in plenty of great work on the cello. His song Prairie is beautiful.

I'll make one last suggestion then shut up. Jonny Greenwood recently set up a label called "Octatonic Records" that focuses solely on classical music, both old and new. They've release 2 records so far, the first was dedicated to Bach and the second features one piece by Greenwood himself and another by Michael Gordon.

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Post by Koekepan » Wed Oct 23, 2019 1:49 pm

I thought that I should chip in, since I am actually a classical guitarist and I've spent many hours playing (and enjoying) Vivaldi.

My top tip for another, similar but different sound would be Scarlatti. There's quite a bit of his music out there, transcribed or performed in different contexts, and there's a sort of delicacy without dryness that really works.

If you want more symphonic sounds, you can't go wrong with the father of the symphony: Haydn.

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Post by Slothrop » Wed Oct 23, 2019 5:59 pm

doublestewart wrote: I think lots of the more closely linked composers such as Bach were suggested first. But considering the nature of these forums, I think the 20th century composers suggested are completely valid as they have ties to early electronic music and have had strong influences on lots of electronic artists.
Fair - I was maybe being gratuitously snarky there.

My tip for someone who likes the harmonic elegance of the Baroque but is also down with the sparseness and repetition of modern electronic music would be Arvo Pärt, eg Fratres for Strings and Percussion:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wcMFQ8-r_cU
or the Cantus in Memory of Benjamin Britten:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sp2oxWdRMuk

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Post by MarcelP » Wed Oct 23, 2019 6:27 pm

Slothrop wrote: My tip for someone who likes the harmonic elegance of the Baroque but is also down with the sparseness and repetition of modern electronic music would be Arvo Pärt, eg Fratres for Strings and Percussion:
Just back from seeing Steve Reich (being performed and literally being there) in London - I would think something like his Music for 18 Musicians or Desert Music would also fit the bill.

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Post by Fastus » Wed Oct 23, 2019 8:38 pm

Just about anything performed by violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter

Mozart or Beethoven violin concertos would make an excellent start, though this CD with Dutilleaux (written for her) and Bartok is just amazing if you're looking for something that's both modern & more accessible than 12 tone rows

https://www.discogs.com/Anne-Sophie-Mut ... er/1052945
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Post by Clumsy » Fri Dec 06, 2019 11:04 am

Since this is the most recent thread on classical music I have to add my bit. It's about all I listen to at the moment. I was exposed early as well, but only started to go through my dad's record collection in my late teens or early twenties. Like any music, some of it will speak to you and some of it won't (I can pretty much skip the Classical and Romantic periods). Here are a few of my favourites...

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