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WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

AUTECHRE
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Production Techniques Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next [all]
Author AUTECHRE
DT
WTF, been a long time fan of Warp music but only now I've truly discovered them and explored them carefully.
How the f*** do they do those complicated yet spectacular and musical rhythms?
The melodic is quite easy tho..but the beats...damn!
ignatius
there's a long, 160+ page Ask Autechre Anything.. archived on WATTM where they speak freely about all things production related.. there's lot's of blah blah bah in there too.. it's a fun read really.. for an autechre fan.

http://forum.watmm.com/topic/81109-aaa-ask-autechre-anything-sean-and- rob-on-watmm/

and then there's the shrunken version.. but i kinda like the wattmm version w/all the chatter in it.

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0Alpd5T07zNgAdFZHaEFjOWZTV WN0T0hIUXdMS0dPNVE&usp=sharing#gid=0


and there is also this thread here at muff's already wink

https://www.muffwiggler.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=4468&highlight=autec hre
CJ Miller
What I think is interesting about a lot of Autechre's music is that they don't divide into some melody and some beats. There are a few connected processes going on, where the microstructure and macrostructure are related. Using an environment like Max/MSP helps for this, because you are not limited to notes, beats, bars, loops, etc - you can define your whole musical language for every track. There a bit of a steep leaning curve to these things. PD or SuperCollider would work just as well. One you learn enough to get around, it becomes apparent that with a little work, you can get some mindbending effect that would be impossible in a DAW or on regular gear. But tying it all together into coherent music becomes the challenge. Lots of people use Max/MSP, but only two of them are Autechre.
DT
wicked
DT
CJ Miller wrote:
What I think is interesting about a lot of Autechre's music is that they don't divide into some melody and some beats. There are a few connected processes going on, where the microstructure and macrostructure are related. Using an environment like Max/MSP helps for this, because you are not limited to notes, beats, bars, loops, etc - you can define your whole musical language for every track. There a bit of a steep leaning curve to these things. PD or SuperCollider would work just as well. One you learn enough to get around, it becomes apparent that with a little work, you can get some mindbending effect that would be impossible in a DAW or on regular gear. But tying it all together into coherent music becomes the challenge. Lots of people use Max/MSP, but only two of them are Autechre.


thank you too for the reply.
again, know them since a long time but just recently had time to dig more into their music and it's immense.
will check max/msp out more, there's a great trained max teacher in my area too, might contact him pretty soon!
stk
CJ Miller wrote:
But tying it all together into coherent music becomes the challenge.


There's the rub. I reckon a big part of the brilliance of ae is that they are really good at editing their own jams into songs, and thus most of their recorded output is pretty quality.

Live, imo, is another thing. At least the time I saw them, was pretty tedious, sounded like a couple dudes jamming away in their bedroom, really needed an edit.
babs_santini
the everchanging idea of playing a studio as an instrument is mindblowing we're not worthy
http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/apr04/articles/autechre.htm
sempervirent
DT wrote:
How the f*** do they do those complicated yet spectacular and musical rhythms?

The most illuminating comment in the epic WATMM thread was that they spend almost every waking hour working on music. That's how they do it.

Sean wrote:
for me prob about 80-90% most days, day or two off each week, usually one

Rob wrote:
prob 12hrs on weekdays. weekends is not so.


Having specific pieces of gear, secret techniques, or advanced programming skills are not as valuable as having that much time to focus on your work. If you devote that much effort to anything, you will become really good at it.
ignatius
sempervirent wrote:
DT wrote:
How the f*** do they do those complicated yet spectacular and musical rhythms?

The most illuminating comment in the epic WATMM thread was that they spend almost every waking hour working on music. That's how they do it.

Sean wrote:
for me prob about 80-90% most days, day or two off each week, usually one

Rob wrote:
prob 12hrs on weekdays. weekends is not so.


Having specific pieces of gear, secret techniques, or advanced programming skills are not as valuable as having that much time to focus on your work. If you devote that much effort to anything, you will become really good at it.


in the Simply Superior podcast there's a discussion w/sean booth about him taking a year to just improve his coding skills. it's an interesting discussion that goes through a few different topics not all music related. discussion about mobile devices, software, travel etc etc he doesn't join the discussion for a little while but goes to the end.

https://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/the-simply-superior-podcast/id4921 73397
colossal
Don't overlook incunabula. Still a fantastic album, I was 10 years late to the party :)
tuj
early stuff was traditional synths and good programming

later stuff was all either max/msp or supercollider on laptops I thought.

never read the production thread, going to do that now, but always been a huge fan of Autechre.
Ekofisk
ignatius wrote:
sempervirent wrote:
DT wrote:
How the f*** do they do those complicated yet spectacular and musical rhythms?

The most illuminating comment in the epic WATMM thread was that they spend almost every waking hour working on music. That's how they do it.

Sean wrote:
for me prob about 80-90% most days, day or two off each week, usually one

Rob wrote:
prob 12hrs on weekdays. weekends is not so.


Having specific pieces of gear, secret techniques, or advanced programming skills are not as valuable as having that much time to focus on your work. If you devote that much effort to anything, you will become really good at it.


in the Simply Superior podcast there's a discussion w/sean booth about him taking a year to just improve his coding skills. it's an interesting discussion that goes through a few different topics not all music related. discussion about mobile devices, software, travel etc etc he doesn't join the discussion for a little while but goes to the end.

https://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/the-simply-superior-podcast/id4921 73397


Thanks for the link! Listening now... interesting stuff.
alexdg
This isn't particularly helpful from a technique perspective, but here's a list of gear they've used over the years:

http://mikebaas.org/autechre/
exeterdown
The most illuminating comment in the epic WATMM thread was that they spend almost every waking hour working on music. That's how they do it.

Sean wrote:
for me prob about 80-90% most days, day or two off each week, usually one

Rob wrote:
prob 12hrs on weekdays. weekends is not so.


Having specific pieces of gear, secret techniques, or advanced programming skills are not as valuable as having that much time to focus on your work. If you devote that much effort to anything, you will become really good at it.[/quote]

You have to distinguish though.
That's not every waking hour actually making sound.
The question was more along the lines of "doing something related to music" and the way these guys would think about stuff like that might be just kicking back with a splif and listening to one of their favorite records, learning how to program, or thinking about music while going for a bike ride.
krz
Was getting to sound like almost everything was Elektron related 5-6 years ago.
Their use of the rare ensoniq eps sys hack was great in the day. Glad to hear on subsequent releases that they kept on the edge. :) Now I'd like for Boards of Canada to confirm some techniques. I've figured some out, been shown others,
but other than gear lists, I haven't seen much divulging, or tips from them.
husc
Being original within a musical genre or label and using your gear not trying to copy other artists, this is essential for honing your skills but will rarely make you stand out.

In my opinion the best compliment for an electronic musician is being discussed, dissected and imitated to no end by your own audience.
ignatius
new one coming out on that bleep comp is super sick.

audio is kind of funky in a few places but you get the idea. not full res either. is a crushed mp3

en.
well... i love it
stk
en. wrote:
well... i love it
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rQ84hKQPTAA


Sweet, that's the best thing I've heard from the guys in a looong time SlayerBadger!. Maybe they have redeemed themselves..
T of J
CJ Miller wrote:
Lots of people use Max/MSP, but only two of them are Autechre.


Thread win.
pantalones
If you're super curious there are some ae nord modular g2 patches and a few max patches floating around the dark, neglected corners of the interwebs. The guys shared them with a few friends, then those friends shared them with other friends, and then they got around a bit too far and Sean asked that they be taken down publicly. But you can still find them.
solaris
@pantalones
afaik those were fakes, except for a max patch (the one which played variations of a EP7 track)
amnesia
You cant say you are into electronic music if you dont dig at least one Autechre album.

I have said it a billion times. No one comes close to them in pushing boundaries in modern composition.
stk
amnesia wrote:
You cant say you are into electronic music if you dont dig at least one Autechre album.

I have said it a billion times. No one comes close to them in pushing boundaries in modern composition.


Well that's something of a tall order, personal tastes and all.

I'm a fan of a lot of their stuff (middle period, basically. Early stuff I find hokey and dated; recent, boring) so I would agree that they are an important part of electronic music history. Also, as a fan, I reckon they lost their mojo about 10 years ago and have been kind of coasting since.

seriously, i just don't get it no accounting for taste, right?
amnesia
stk wrote:
Also, as a fan, I reckon they lost their mojo about 10 years ago and have been kind of coasting since.

seriously, i just don't get it no accounting for taste, right?


I would agree to this statement.
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