MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index
 FAQ & Terms of UseFAQ & Terms Of Use   Wiggler RadioMW Radio   Muff Wiggler TwitterTwitter   Support the site @ PatreonPatreon 
 SearchSearch   RegisterSign up   Log inLog in 
WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

Securing a PCB to a faceplate.
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Music Tech DIY Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next [all]
Author Securing a PCB to a faceplate.
Waz
What do you guys do to secure PCBs perpendicular to the faceplate? I'm really at a loss with this one.
seriously, i just don't get it

*Edited to take horizontal mounting into consideration as well.
Muff Wiggler
wee little L-shaped brackets

see here:

https://www.muffwiggler.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=585
Waz
Muff Wiggler
Are these easily obtainable from the hardware store?
Muff Wiggler
yep, try the framing/hanging section

Waz
Thanks. I'm not a hardware store kinda guy, so I never thought of that. You saved me some serious cash though. I was going to buy the bridechamber ones.
applause
Muff Wiggler
i've never bought anything like that, i have the biggest pile of 'random bits' all in a container, and somehow there's tons of those, been kicking around here for years, since way before i thought of making DIY modules!
meridic
I bend a piece of thin aluminum into an L shape. I make it so it is about 1" smaller then the hieght of the face plate. The face plate side of the L is long enough to go under the the pots/jacks on one side and is drilled so it has corresponding holes for the pots/jacks. The other side of the L is long enough to accomedate the PCB + the pots/jacks, The PCB mounts onto that part of the L with standoffs. This way the jacks/pots afix the bracket and the PCB to the panel with no extra holes and no screws are needed or visable on the front panel.
consumed
i had trouble finding tiny little brackets with 4-40 threading so i ordered from mcmaster.com
you can also find a great assortment of threaded standoffs there if you want to set your pcb back a bit
ultimately i ended up switching to 1" 1/16" aluminum L-bracket to mount the pcb (found it at lowes hardware store)
the L-bracket works great if you have pots on the board, as those are deep enough to mount onto
its more work but you dont end up with screws in the front panel.

https://www.muffwiggler.com/forum/userpix/57_topp281fin1_1.jpg
https://www.muffwiggler.com/forum/userpix/57_topp281fin2_1.jpg
pugix
I think this is one answer to your question. Pardon me, if I didn't understand.

I often use Bridechamber brackets for DIY projects (and before that, the similar Stooge brackets). The idea is that pots or jacks on the panel mount through the front part of the bracket, securing it to the panel at the same time, and the PC board mounts on standoffs to the bracket sticking out the back. Example:

http://pugix.com/synth/resonant-lopass-gate/

This is nice and sturdy, and there aren't any screws showing on the front panel. The depth of the bracket is usually determined by the size of the PC board. The deepest are some of the CGS boards. Example:

http://pugix.com/synth/dual-cgs-65-tube-vca-timbral-gate/
sduck
I agree!

Like this-

Muff Wiggler
that is a WAY better approach than my 'found' L-brackets

and no extra hole on the faceplate! thumbs up
valis
I just use the little Ls and drill a small hole in the panel. Here's what I use:

Mouser Part No: 534-621
neandrewthal
I'm too cheap for the bridechamber stooge brackets too, so I make my own out of galvanized step flashing from Home Depot. It's really thin, but sturdy enough for me. It comes pre bent for $.99 per 10" or so sheet and it cuts easily with a pair of shears. It doesn't extend very far behind the panel, so you can't mount all 4 corners of the PCB to it like pugix and sduck do unless it's a pretty small PCB. I don't like doing that anyway because I prefer to do the wiring with the boards in place already.

doctorvague
neandrewthal wrote:





Whatever that module is, it looks like quite a project - YOW!!
Dave Kendall
Hi.

Similar to some other guys here, I use bits of 20mm x 20mm aluminium "L" angle from a hardware store. Comes in up to 2 metre lengths.

Pots go through the face on the panel, and the pot on its own is spaced with an M8 washer. When bigger boards are used, a longer (and bigger - 25x25 or 30x30mm) piece of L bracket is used, and cut away above the jacks to give clearance for them. M3 bolts, washers and nuts secure the PCB to the bracket.
Photo shows a CGS65 tube VCA in a 12HP euro rack. There's a DPDT toggle just behind the bracket.

The pots are rotated through 180 degrees, as they are Alpha-type with knurled shafts with a slot in them. This way, tightening the screw on a collet knob doesn't squash the two halves of the shaft together. The pot pins are bent back through 90 degrees.



cheers,
Dave
(edited to make more sense, hopefully...)
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
I go to a place called "Metal Supermarket" and buy sheets of 1/32" stainless steel for my custom stooge brackets. I am lucky enough to work in a place with a machine shop, so I have access to all the tools I need: a pedal-operated guillotine with adjustable gate, a punch (looks like giant pliers from hell, with a selection of male and female punch bits in various sizes), a press (the hydraulic kind with the big "one-armed bandit" handle, with 90-degree-angle bending jigs), and a wire-wheel (for dressing and buffing sharp edges).

I punch 3/8" holes for the pot shafts (2 or 3, depending on the size of the board) and 1/8" holes for the PCB mounting screws. I typically leave 3/4" to 1" of clearance between the back of the pots (I invariably use 24mm Alpha pots from Small Bear) and the edge of the PCB. I can cut, punch, bend and buff a bracket in about 15 minutes. It's deeply satisfying! Lotsa Love

Here's a couple of pix:
Waz
This thread is border-line "sticky" worthy
bf
I know that this is counter to the question of the op and not always an option depending on the size of the board, but as this thread is turning into a resource worthy one I figured I might as well add my parallel hack job in fwiw.
I prep spots a bit larger than the size of a standoff on the back of the panel and use a bit of JB weld. 1" standoffs give plenty of clearance for switches and pots.

I only used three standoffs here, two being on the far side of the board.
Waz
bf
It's cool. I didn't realize this thread would become worthy of praise. I edited the main subject line to encompass all PCB mounting.
SlayerBadger!
emdot_ambient
This should definitely be stickied. I dread the HW side of DIY. Populating PCB's I actually find soothing, but all the HW chores...cutting, bending, drilling, assembling...are like nightmares waiting to happen.
fonik
i make myself brackets from steelsheets too, and mount them using the jack sockets or potentiometers, as seen on al these nice pix above. what i like about it is that you don't see mounting screws ont he front.

for completness: i know that some guys use 2-component glue to mount standoffs to the aluminium panel. anyone?
bf
fonik wrote:
for completness: i know that some guys use 2-component glue to mount standoffs to the aluminium panel. anyone?
That is essential what my example is, although using an epoxy rather than a glue.
zthee
This is the way I like to do it.

Not mine on the picture though - http://icb.se/araya/pics/sergepics/serge_open_big.jpg
Waz
fonik wrote:
i make myself brackets from steelsheets too, and mount them using the jack sockets or potentiometers, as seen on al these nice pix above. what i like about it is that you don't see mounting screws ont he front.

for completness: i know that some guys use 2-component glue to mount standoffs to the aluminium panel. anyone?


My dad suggested I should just glue the PCB to the panel via hot glue. I opted out of that. He's a big DIYer, but isn't into the aesthetics of it
Waz
zthee wrote:
This is the way I like to do it.

Not mine on the picture though - http://icb.se/araya/pics/sergepics/serge_open_big.jpg


That is quite intimidating. Makes my hair fall out just thinking about building something like that.
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Music Tech DIY Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next [all]
Page 1 of 3
Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group