MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index
 FAQ & Terms of UseFAQ & Terms Of Use   Wiggler RadioMW Radio   Muff Wiggler TwitterTwitter   Support the site @ PatreonPatreon 
 SearchSearch   RegisterSign up   Log inLog in 
WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

Euro-Duino by Circuit Abbey
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Eurorack Modules Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next [all]
Author Euro-Duino by Circuit Abbey
evs
just saw this at modulargrid..
even with a price, so it can not be too far away..

http://www.modulargrid.net/e/circuit-abbey-euro-duino

but i did not found any talking about this yet, no other information...

so, who wants to share some information? w00t
evs
allright... didn´t find that in the first place..:
https://www.muffwiggler.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=117066&highlight=eur oduino

however, looks nice enough that this module can his their own thread..!
Kodama
Nice price. I'm building one at the moment. Guinness ftw!
evs
where...? but its not even yet availible on their site.. or do you work for them? It's peanut butter jelly time!
BrotherTheo
Okay, here goes: The announcement video is here


The Euro-Duino is a generic Arduino based Eurorack kit in 6HP. It uses an Arduino Pro Mini 328 at 16 MHz.

Features:

2 CV inputs
2 CV output
2 Digital inputs
2 Digital outputs
2 Pots
2 3-position toggle switches
Uses regular Arduino IDE for programming and downloading

6HP, 47mm Deep

Web page is up, although a work in progress:
http://www.circuitabbey.com/EuroDuinoKit.html

Price is $95 for the kit and $145 assembled. The download cable is $18.

Available in the next few days.

--Brother Theo
BrotherTheo
evs wrote:
where...? but its not even yet availible on their site.. or do you work for them? It's peanut butter jelly time!

He is the Overlord. And one of our beta testers. And my marketing guy, although he does not drink martinis.

--BT
evs
So, i'm not at all familiar with arduino... How does it work?
Is there a usb connect on the mdule to load new functions?
Could one use the same arduino "scripts"(?) that are availnle for the ardcore?
Or do the user have to do all the programming?
And which things will you offer for direct use?

Awesome price, by the way, and very interesting module..!
flx
Interesting! But how much voltage does it accept and put out?

I once made a distortion effect with an Arduino, using just one or two lines of code razz

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tI4n18gHMpA


The Arduino programming language is quite easy to learn and you can also just send other people's code to the chip, using the USB cable. There are differences between Arduinos though, so I wouldn't assume that the Ardcore programs are compatible without somewhat or a rewrite.
Nantonos
evs wrote:
So, i'm not at all familiar with arduino... How does it work?


An Arduino is a microcontroller board that uses the Arduino name, logo and programming environment in return for giving the Arduino organization 5% of sales. Low end ones use an 8-bit AVR processor, higher end ones use an ARM M3 or M4 16-bit processor.

This particular one is the Arduino Pro Mini 328 which is very low cost. Sparkfun make it, and sell it for USD 9.95. Connecting it in a modular environment means adding input protection, and output buffering (and filtering), and a front panel, jacks, pots and Euro power.

What that gets you is an Arduino-compatible raw module that you program to turn it into something useful. There is an example sketch that creates two sine LFOs.

evs wrote:
Is there a usb connect on the mdule to load new functions?


No. Part of the "low cost" is that you don't program over USB; instead you connect another microcontroller, called an ISP, to upload programs. Mind you, that programmer ups the cost for a single module.

evs wrote:
Could one use the same arduino "scripts"(?) that are availnle for the ardcore?
Or do the user have to do all the programming?


You could use or adapt programs written for other Arduino boards, but this particular module has specific pins used for the digital inputs, switches, CV ins and pots (which go to on-board 10bit ADCs), digital outs and "analog" CV outs (filtered PWM). Sketches written for other boards would likely allocate those pins differently, so you would have to adapt them.
BrotherTheo
flx wrote:
Interesting! But how much voltage does it accept and put out?

All inputs and outputs are 0-5 volts. Downloading is accomplished using a USB download cable, which is available through Circuit Abbey or Spark Fun.

--Brother Theo
evs
BrotherTheo wrote:

Downloading is accomplished using a USB download cable, which is available through Circuit Abbey or Spark Fun.

--Brother Theo



Nantonos wrote:
No. Part of the "low cost" is that you don't program over USB; instead you connect another microcontroller, called an ISP, to upload programs. Mind you, that programmer ups the cost for a single module.



so... not programming with usb, but downloading? hmmm.....
i´m not getting it, sorry! Dead Banana
os
It's a good summer for small hackable modules with two pots!

Would be nice if Eurorack bootstraps another generation of coders. Proper coding, mind you, with an eye to resource limitations.
Funky40
evs wrote:



so... not programming with usb, but downloading? hmmm.....
i´m not getting it, sorry! Dead Banana


he allready asked my question
flx
evs wrote:
BrotherTheo wrote:

Downloading is accomplished using a USB download cable, which is available through Circuit Abbey or Spark Fun.

--Brother Theo



Nantonos wrote:
No. Part of the "low cost" is that you don't program over USB; instead you connect another microcontroller, called an ISP, to upload programs. Mind you, that programmer ups the cost for a single module.



so... not programming with usb, but downloading? hmmm.....
i´m not getting it, sorry! Dead Banana


You program your code on the computer, then compile (build) it into a "software" and then connect the module via USB and load that software onto the Arduino chip. Sometimes you need a special USB data transfer adapter (or adapter cable) and sometimes the Arduino has a USB port itself, so you just need a simple USB cable. The Circuit Abbey module looks like it needs a special USB adapter cable, which isn't a big deal though.
mckenic
Really cool and GREAT price too!
Is there ANY way (expander perhaps) to have the programming pins broken out to the front/broken out to a standard USB connection?

Imagine taking this out of your case and re-programming it 15 times to test out different code - I think I would be driven to distraction! zombie

Just my opinion tho and will probably end up with one anyway hihi
adam
the pro mini doesn't have a usb port - the nano does though, so if it's pin compatible you could use a nano instead

that said you could always leave the cable attached and stick it out through the front of your case
boramx
great news.

cheers bro theo!

so....

this?
https://www.sparkfun.com/products/9718

hmmm..... might need to make a 2hp breakout for that header.......
euromorcego
Quote:
It's a good summer for small hackable modules with two pots!

Indeed.

From the schematics, it looks the CV out on the Euro-Duino does not have a DAC, only filtered PWM. Or am I wrong?

Hopefully some people will program some interessting stuff. The Arduino is rather limited, even more though without a DAC, but something like Euklidean rhythms or a source of randomness should for sure be possible.

Maybe with the switch, one could even put different programs into the memory, then there is less need to always upload new code. It is always good to have an extra choice of utlility modules that are only rarely needed -- for this something like the Euro-Duino would be perfect.
Nantonos
flx wrote:
evs wrote:
BrotherTheo wrote:

Downloading is accomplished using a USB download cable, which is available through Circuit Abbey or Spark Fun.

--Brother Theo


Nantonos wrote:
No. Part of the "low cost" is that you don't program over USB; instead you connect another microcontroller, called an ISP, to upload programs. Mind you, that programmer ups the cost for a single module.



so... not programming with usb, but downloading? hmmm.....
i´m not getting it, sorry! Dead Banana


You program your code on the computer, then compile (build) it into a "software" and then connect the module via USB


The module doesn't have a USB connection, so no.

Instead you need a whole other microcontroller which does have USB, and a bunch of wires to connect In various ways - ICSP is common - to the controller that doesn't have USB.

Here is an example - the controller being programmed (the black chip) is on a breadboard, and an Arduino Uno (the blue thing) is being used to program it via the mess of coloured wires:


Here is another programmer


As a way to reduce unit costs for people making hundreds or thousands of boards that are rarely reprogrammed, its a win.

As a way to program a module that most people will have one of, and will need to program, it makes the total cost higher and the inconvenience and learning curve greater.

A board which you simply plug a USB cable into would have been a better choice here, in my opinion.

flx wrote:
The Circuit Abbey module looks like it needs a special USB adapter cable, which isn't a big deal though.


$15 programmer for a $10 board. Adds up to $25 when you can get better boards (with USB) for $18 that just use an ordinary USB cable.
Nantonos
os wrote:
It's a good summer for small hackable modules with two pots!


But yours has a two channel 24bit DAC, as I understand it, which is a substantial advance on just PWM (even with decent filtering, which this one seems to have).
Liquidyzer
This, disting and I'm sure others, the rise and rise of the multi functional programmable module? woah
BrotherTheo
Hi,

Here is how programming works: The programming cable is USB on one end and a 6-pin connector on the other that attaches to the Arduino on the back of the module. The Arduino IDE compiles the code and uploads it to the Arduino through this cable ("Upload" is their term).

My set up has a long power cable so I can have the module out of the case. I plug in the programming cable in and start developing. We looked at doing a USB connector but it would take up a lot of room. The idea of a 2HP panel with a 6-pin connector is interesting. I would have to research how to make that work. Another trick is to leave the module in the case and leave 1HP next to it for the programming cable to exit the rack.

Yes, the Sparkfun DEV-09718 cable will work just fine. We will be selling one as well.

Yes, we use filtered PWM to produce CV outputs. This is to save cost and space. The cutoff is about 200 Hz. We are looking into optionally bumping the cutoff to about 3.5 KHz. The downside is you have to diddle with timer settings, and this in turn messes with some delay functions.

--BT
Kodama
It's a $95 kit, which is just crazy awesome. I have wanted a little VC clock forever, and this gives you 2 in 6hp. Of course it doesn't do everything, but for size/$/features, it is great!

You just upload programs via the usb adapter cable, which you can just hang off the side of your module.

Chances are that I will have a few setup to do special functions full time, and one to experiment with. For $95, you can afford to do that! It's peanut butter jelly time!
Kodama
BTW - Brother Theo is working on getting started guides so that you can easily upload existing code, even if you are not a programmer.
bendedavis
BrotherTheo wrote:
Hi,

Here is how programming works: The programming cable is USB on one end and a 6-pin connector on the other that attaches to the Arduino on the back of the module. The Arduino IDE compiles the code and uploads it to the Arduino through this cable ("Upload" is their term).

My set up has a long power cable so I can have the module out of the case. I plug in the programming cable in and start developing. We looked at doing a USB connector but it would take up a lot of room. The idea of a 2HP panel with a 6-pin connector is interesting. I would have to research how to make that work. Another trick is to leave the module in the case and leave 1HP next to it for the programming cable to exit the rack.

Yes, the Sparkfun DEV-09718 cable will work just fine. We will be selling one as well.

Yes, we use filtered PWM to produce CV outputs. This is to save cost and space. The cutoff is about 200 Hz. We are looking into optionally bumping the cutoff to about 3.5 KHz. The downside is you have to diddle with timer settings, and this in turn messes with some delay functions.

--BT


You should check out the Microchip MCP4728, extremely cheap and provides 4 buffered 12-bit outputs.
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Eurorack Modules Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next [all]
Page 1 of 6
Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group