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WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

Today my small discovery was...
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Eurorack Modules Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 30, 31, 32, 33  Next [all]
Author Today my small discovery was...
joeSeggiola
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
2.2k is my go-to resistor value for most LEDs.

What? 2.2kΩ means ~3mA through the LED with a 9V battery, isn't it very little? I usually aim at 15mA for 5 and 3mm LEDs, which means a ~500Ω resistor at 9V... Am I missing something?
colb
Today my small discovery was...

Taking a larger division from a clock divider to set up a shuffle on an LFO being used as clock. Then the smaller divisions can be used for fills and more interesting sub rhythms.

e.g.
square out of LFO into dividers clock input.
dividers 1/16 output into LFOs lin FM input turned up to 10'o'clock (ladik VCO5)
dividers 1/64 output to kick
dividers 1/8 divided again by 4 (same as inverted 1/32 out) into another kick
dividers 1/4 out driving a hat type sound, but switched now and again to the 1/2 output for a fill

(divider is set to gate output not trigger)

Hmm.. now to try it on an LFO with reset...
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
joeSeggiola wrote:
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
2.2k is my go-to resistor value for most LEDs.

What? 2.2kΩ means ~3mA through the LED with a 9V battery, isn't it very little? I usually aim at 15mA for 5 and 3mm LEDs, which means a ~500Ω resistor at 9V... Am I missing something?


I'm using 2.2k for 3mm green LEDs from 5V, and they are so bright I can hardly stand to look at them. I'd probably go a bit bigger, maybe 3.3k, next time. I don't actually like blinkenlights very much, as I find them distracting, and they tend to be a distraction during design that I find to be more trouble than it is worth. However, sometimes they are necessary, and then I like them to be not so bright.
gelabs
Two oscillators + utilities like mix/max, rectifier and ring modulator + a simple sequencer = joy for hours smile

(yep, i am a noob at this :p )
colb
...how to make a two stage (three if you include the un-shifted input cv as a stage) Analog Shift Register using a dual sample and hold and half of a rampage!
cptnal
File this one under "hiding in plain sight"...

Finally got around to trying Telharmonic's shift register mode, and instantly magical shit started happening. Lotsa Love
cg_funk
OK. this one was so simple and it blew me away

Run my kick drum through envelope follower (Ears or Maths), and then quantize that envelope to a scale using the clock as a trigger. Instant repeating melody, wow! Now, modulate the decay of the drum a bit with a slow LFO, this creates melodic variations that are simply beautiful. Then, when I switch up the drum beat, the melody changes in fantastic unexpected ways.

Compared to using quantized LFOs for pitches, this envelope based method is much richer IMO. I think it has something to do with the decay shape of the envelopes.
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
Here are a few little discoveries I have made in the last few days while finishing up my massive handbuilt Polaris project:

1) When stacking a bunch of boards using hex spacers (the kind that screw into each other), don't tighten the spacers with a nut driver or wrench. Simply tighten them finger tight. If they are tightened down, they tend to bite into the PCB and the mounting holes are never perfectly aligned. This causes the spacers to take on a slight angle, so that by the time you have 4 or 5 PCBs stacked up, they will become increasingly difficult to put on the spacers. If the spacers are just finger tight, then all the PCBs slide on with ease (and I have 12 PCBs stacked up on my Polaris). There is no danger of them coming loose.

2) When using pin headers to take power and/or signals from one board to the next in a stack, don't bother with those female-to-long-pin strips that you have to cut with an x-acto knife and break and always lose a pin in-between and end up with ugly rough edges. Simply put two parallel rows of holes on your PCB, and use simple short-pin females on one row and pins pointed downward on the other. This makes every board have female upward and male downward. With this method, you can stack as many boards as you want and transfer rail power from board to board with ease. The trick is to stagger the position of the females and the males from board to board (i.e., females out, pins in on one board, then females in and males out on the next, etc.). It takes up slightly more board space, but it's super worth it.

3) Before putting the downward-pointing pins on the next PCB in the stack, place the board on top of the stack using the proper hex spacers, then slide the pins into their holes and plug them into the female sockets below. The pins will probably be too long, so simply slide the little plastic bits down the pins with your fingertips until they are flush with the PCB. Then remove the board from the stack and solder the pins -- they will now be the perfect length.

Those last two discoveries have been a life changer for me. It will make my builds oh so much cleaner and easier and faster.

I will be reproducing this post on my Doc Sketchy thread.
BaloErets
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
Here are a few little discoveries I have made in the last few days while finishing up my massive handbuilt Polaris project:

1) When stacking a bunch of boards using hex spacers (the kind that screw into each other), don't tighten the spacers with a nut driver or wrench. Simply tighten them finger tight. If they are tightened down, they tend to bite into the PCB and the mounting holes are never perfectly aligned. This causes the spacers to take on a slight angle, so that by the time you have 4 or 5 PCBs stacked up, they will become increasingly difficult to put on the spacers. If the spacers are just finger tight, then all the PCBs slide on with ease (and I have 12 PCBs stacked up on my Polaris). There is no danger of them coming loose.

2) When using pin headers to take power and/or signals from one board to the next in a stack, don't bother with those female-to-long-pin strips that you have to cut with an x-acto knife and break and always lose a pin in-between and end up with ugly rough edges. Simply put two parallel rows of holes on your PCB, and use simple short-pin females on one row and pins pointed downward on the other. This makes every board have female upward and male downward. With this method, you can stack as many boards as you want and transfer rail power from board to board with ease. The trick is to stagger the position of the females and the males from board to board (i.e., females out, pins in on one board, then females in and males out on the next, etc.). It takes up slightly more board space, but it's super worth it.

3) Before putting the downward-pointing pins on the next PCB in the stack, place the board on top of the stack using the proper hex spacers, then slide the pins into their holes and plug them into the female sockets below. The pins will probably be too long, so simply slide the little plastic bits down the pins with your fingertips until they are flush with the PCB. Then remove the board from the stack and solder the pins -- they will now be the perfect length.

Those last two discoveries have been a life changer for me. It will make my builds oh so much cleaner and easier and faster.

I will be reproducing this post on my Doc Sketchy thread.


Hey Doc! Any place we can read up on this massive Polaris project. Sounds really intriguing!!
Moog$FooL$
"and I have 12 PCBs stacked up on my Polaris"

Madness!!! woah
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
BaloErets wrote:
Hey Doc! Any place we can read up on this massive Polaris project. Sounds really intriguing!!


You can read up on all of my crazy little projects here:

Something New from Doc Sketchy

The Polaris project is at the very end, and I'm going to be posting a whole lot more stuff over the next day or two, because I'm going to finish the build today.
hinterlands303
Super obvious but I didn't think of it until today. Mutable Elements into an envelope follower is a great way to get complex envelopes. I got the best results using primarily the dry exciter with just a little of the resonator mixed in and a tiny bit of release on the envelope follower. So many crazy shapes!

I really love Elements but don't always want that particular sound in my patches so it's nice to find another way to integrate it into the system.
sjbucks
This week I discovered that I can stop MI Marbles by plugging a dummy cable into the clock input.

I also found out that if I patch the headphone output from a cheap pocket radio into the "In" of MI Rings it becomes a one-way ticket to the Drone Zone.
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
The other day I discovered that the key to playing the guitar is relaxation.

I was sitting in my office at school with my gut-string guitar, not really thinking about it. I put the butt of the guitar on my thigh so that the neck was at a fairly steep angle with the nut just about level with my eyes. This is the wrong way to hold a guitar, but I don't care. My office chair has armrests so I can't hold it properly. I was just leaning back, zoning out, and playing. The music flowed very naturally and my picking was just about perfect. No thought.

Also, I made another discovery that day, after watching a video of the late, great jazz trumpeter Clark Terry. One of the keys to playing stuff which sounds like bebop is in accenting some of the notes, like at the beginning of a phrase, or at the high point of the line. After watching Clark Terry play and noting how he accented his notes, I tried it on the guitar, and the naff lines I played sounded much more like jazz. I'm now convinced that how you play jazz lines is just as, if not more, important than the actual notes you play.
Foghorn
Plug the CV out from the Doepfer A-198 Ribbon controller into the 2HP Arp module, then play it slow enough and you have an instant harp that feels and plays like a harp.
Kinda cool.

Foghorn
starthief
Cold Mac as a logical XOR (thanks to a helpful Lines post):

Assume two gate inputs where 0V = logical 0, +5V is logical 1.

set SURVEY knob to 0V
patch incoming GATE 1 to OR1 (it's normalled to AND1)
patch incoming GATE 2 to SURVEY (it's normalled to OR2 and AND2)
patch AND OUT to FADE
patch OR OUT to OFFSET
RIGHT OUT is the logical XOR of GATE 1 and GATE 2

The output will be +5V when either GATE 1 or GATE 2 is +5V, but not when they both are.

The fun part about this is it works as a phase comparator in a PLL patch, even if the gates are less than perfectly 0-5V. (It works less well with non-squarewaves.)

I just synced two square LFOs in Stages despite their sliders being in different positions Mr. Green
smithjohn
colb wrote:
Today my small discovery was...

Taking a larger division from a clock divider to set up a shuffle on an LFO being used as clock. Then the smaller divisions can be used for fills and more interesting sub rhythms.

e.g.
square out of LFO into dividers clock input.
dividers 1/16 output into LFOs lin FM input turned up to 10'o'clock (ladik VCO5)
dividers 1/64 output to kick
dividers 1/8 divided again by 4 (same as inverted 1/32 out) into another kick
dividers 1/4 out driving a hat type sound, but switched now and again to the 1/2 output for a fill

(divider is set to gate output not trigger)

Hmm.. now to try it on an LFO with reset...


That's a cool trick SlayerBadger!
Tried something similar and got strumming-like behavior with more extreme amounts of the divider out modulating the LFO rate.
StrangeAttraction
Today I discovered that I'm way more excited about new modulation/utilities modules than VCOs and Filters. Must be something wrong with me help
Foghorn
StrangeAttraction wrote:
Must be something wrong with me help
hihi hihi hihi hihi


Ya ain't alone.

Foggy
electricanada
StrangeAttraction wrote:
Today I discovered that I'm way more excited about new modulation/utilities modules than VCOs and Filters. Must be something wrong with me help


No, I get it. It's the utilities that turn your machine into a cable-programmed audio computer. I get most excited about modules having to do with clocking and switching and counting and comparing.
blw
electricanada wrote:
StrangeAttraction wrote:
Today I discovered that I'm way more excited about new modulation/utilities modules than VCOs and Filters. Must be something wrong with me help


No, I get it. It's the utilities that turn your machine into a cable-programmed audio computer. I get most excited about modules having to do with clocking and switching and counting and comparing.


Years ago, a builder made a comment that a filter or vco or anything that modifies sound sold exponentially better than utilities. That may still be true, but it is nice to notice posts pointing in the other direction.

Once after buying/selling/etc, I looked at my system and realized I only had a couple oscillators and gobs and gobs of sequencers, EG’s, cv mixing, trigger logic, dividers, etc. Oops! But cv manipulation sets modular synthesis apart from a Slim Phatty or whatev. Definitely the rabbit hole that is the most fun to me.
StrangeAttraction
For sure. And a nice VCO / VCF is often a gate-way drug into modular (as was in my case). Then once you sober up, you realise that there's a whole new world of sequencing and modulation that awaits you and welcomes you with its clocky switchy sequencery utilitarian arms. Bliss.

blw wrote:
electricanada wrote:
StrangeAttraction wrote:
Today I discovered that I'm way more excited about new modulation/utilities modules than VCOs and Filters. Must be something wrong with me help


No, I get it. It's the utilities that turn your machine into a cable-programmed audio computer. I get most excited about modules having to do with clocking and switching and counting and comparing.


Years ago, a builder made a comment that a filter or vco or anything that modifies sound sold exponentially better than utilities. That may still be true, but it is nice to notice posts pointing in the other direction.

Once after buying/selling/etc, I looked at my system and realized I only had a couple oscillators and gobs and gobs of sequencers, EG’s, cv mixing, trigger logic, dividers, etc. Oops! But cv manipulation sets modular synthesis apart from a Slim Phatty or whatev. Definitely the rabbit hole that is the most fun to me.
BaloErets
That having a clock module running at the main tempo and setting one of it's outputs to /1.5 of the clock is not the same thing as sending /1.5 of a clock's output to the clock input of another clocking module.

Sounds stupid, but depending on the patch, I'll either have a Tempi sending one of it's outputs to clock Pam's New Workout, or one of Pam's outputs is clocking the Tempi.

Usually I'll send a copy of the master tempo to clock the other module, but today I found significant usage of clocking the slave module at /5 and then later at /1.5.

And although I could easily send the master clock to the module and then decide which output should be /5 or /1.5, having the entire module locked in at a more interesting clock really brought some really great results
Granular
Not really sure if this is the right Thread for this.

But what I discovered, starting just 1 Month ago with my first Rack is
that I really don't like these tiny Screens in some Modules.

I bought an µO_C micro Ornament & Crime. I wanted to use it mainly
as a Sequencer (Sequins App). But it is really not fun to mess around with that tiny Screen. I really puts me off and takes the fun out of wiggling around with my Rack. Also i don't find the Sequins App fun to mess around with.

But there's another Screen in my Rack. The Pams New Workout. This one ist a Nightmare. It's so tiny, and combined with the Red Color its hard for me to read it. So I think I replace Pams with the Make Noise Tempi and look for something else to Sequence and revamp my Rack.

The Screen of the Zadar is ok hihi zombie
electricanada
Granular wrote:
Not really sure if this is the right Thread for this.

But what I discovered, starting just 1 Month ago with my first Rack is
that I really don't like these tiny Screens in some Modules.

I bought an µO_C micro Ornament & Crime. I wanted to use it mainly
as a Sequencer (Sequins App). But it is really not fun to mess around with that tiny Screen. I really puts me off and takes the fun out of wiggling around with my Rack. Also i don't find the Sequins App fun to mess around with.

But there's another Screen in my Rack. The Pams New Workout. This one ist a Nightmare. It's so tiny, and combined with the Red Color its hard for me to read it. So I think I replace Pams with the Make Noise Tempi and look for something else to Sequence and revamp my Rack.

The Screen of the Zadar is ok hihi zombie


I didn't start with anti-screen or anti-digital prejudices. But after having built a large modular system over the past year, I have developed these prejudices. I still tolerate CPU-based devices for utilities so long as they don't have screens or complex button pushes, but my audio stream is becoming more and more analog. And even my favorite utilities are mostly analog anymore.
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