MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index
 FAQ & Terms of UseFAQ & Terms Of Use   Wiggler RadioMW Radio   Muff Wiggler TwitterTwitter   Support the site @ PatreonPatreon 
 SearchSearch   RegisterSign up   Log inLog in 
WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

classical/flamenco guitar
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Guitars, Basses, Amps & FX  
Author classical/flamenco guitar
chaosick
So the assumption on this forum seems to be electric guitars..to be used with synthesizers..e.g. both things that accept electric inputs. But my longtime instrument way before synths is firmly grounded in classical and flamenco guitar, with strong jazz influences. I'm blending this with analog/modular synths now. Anybody else in this boat? I think I might be the only person in existence doing this, but please feel free to prove me wrong, (then lets share a beer). Besides all my musical grounding coming from years of playing (acoustic) guitar, I think the sound compliments synths in a much more interesting way than *another* instrument with a line input.
Crowyote
w00t

Welcome to the club! I've been doing this for a while although mostly on steel string guitars and with guitar pedals, tube amps, and a tape echo. I did recently get a Sherman Filterbank 2 and the Pittsburgh Modular Patch Box with some modules tho . . .

Although I love nylon strings and my training originated through the classical/flamenco tradition, I've done most of my recording with the Moog Guitar, Vo-96 Acoustic Synthesizer, and most recently my Epiphany Elitist Byrdland w/ nylon tapewound strings. I've been working the past few years on developing a repertoire and adapting the Carlevaro technique to steel strings (it works quite beautifully).

I'm about to release my first EP of material performed and recorded on the solo Vo-96 tentatively "Psychedelic Classical Vol.1."

What's so cool about the Vo-96 is that it is a magnetic array attached to an acoustic steel string which allows one to control overtone output and sustain/release of the strings. Therefore, one can create effects impossible on the normal classical, acoustic, or electric guitar.

Although the Vo-96 is my "main instrument" I rarely play it live unless there is demand for it. It's a bit unwieldy (I honestly need to get some elusive extra cash for an expensive setup to be done) and sometimes the sounds can be unsettling for a typical audience and my city has a lame general attitude towards new sounds. I often play my Cordoba classical or my Byrdland live . . .

You can hear most of the finished masters on my Bandcamp and early states of the masters on SoundCloud.

crowyote.bandcamp.com
www.soundcloud.com/crowyote
Into the Void
I've tried combining nylon string picking (mostly due to my love of Leonard Cohen) with synth, though in most attempts I end up processing the guitar a certain amount...it's the only way I can get them to fit together in a mix the way I want to. Here's one with nylon and mellotron:
http://bit.ly/2ctnRnM
mckenic
Umm...
Been playing 30 years this year I think.

Although these days (since modular came into it) Im kinda doing - On Melancholy Hill - kind of tunes.

Zube
I live in the south of Spain where flamenco is the dominant music. You're all not alone, while I don't play flamenco, definitely do a lot of classical guitar and live percussion going with, or going into, the modular, synths and pedals.

There is generally a distaste for any electronic instruments, really, in the flamenco world, beyond the electric bass guitar, and even that is forbidden by many traditionalists. It's also kind of hard to work in flamenco time signatures on some sequencers.

Don't have anything done enough to share, but I'm working a few tracks with very flamenco rhythms. And I'm almost done with an ambient/noise piece based around envelope following and effecting field recordings of the Easter Holy Week rituals. So maybe not classical guitar itself- but flamenco influenced? dunno.

Also need to chime in as an American ex-pat, very funny that both Chaosick and Crowyote, you both use "classical guitar" and "flamenco guitar" interchangeably... shame on you, they're two completely different things here in flamencoland!
newbie
I am a newbie, it sounds really hard to me.
newbie
sorry, I place my post at a wrong place.
Crowyote
Zube wrote:
I live in the south of Spain where flamenco is the dominant music. You're all not alone, while I don't play flamenco, definitely do a lot of classical guitar and live percussion going with, or going into, the modular, synths and pedals.

There is generally a distaste for any electronic instruments, really, in the flamenco world, beyond the electric bass guitar, and even that is forbidden by many traditionalists. It's also kind of hard to work in flamenco time signatures on some sequencers.

Don't have anything done enough to share, but I'm working a few tracks with very flamenco rhythms. And I'm almost done with an ambient/noise piece based around envelope following and effecting field recordings of the Easter Holy Week rituals. So maybe not classical guitar itself- but flamenco influenced? dunno.

Also need to chime in as an American ex-pat, very funny that both Chaosick and Crowyote, you both use "classical guitar" and "flamenco guitar" interchangeably... shame on you, they're two completely different things here in flamencoland!


Hmmmph! Spanish semantics! You might as well call it "Spanish Guitar," which dreadfully so many people do. Heck some people call Rodrigo y Gabriela flamenco guitar LOL. Anyway this whole debate has been kinda been beating a dead horse since Ottmar Liebert started introducing flamenco technique into the "New Age" sound (WTF that means lol).

I do actually play some flamenco, and I mean Sabicas, Paco Pena, Paco De Lucia, . . . however, I don't on the Vo-96 and the only flamenco technique I use on it is the rasgueado, and perhaps an occasional alzapua style run. Apoyando, rest stroke just doesn't work on steel strings . . . at least in my experience and it's not part of the Carlevaro technique. So I play flamenco puro only on nylon strings and charge top dollar for a gig when I do, because I really really dislike having to spend hours working on picado scales. There are plenty people who are obsessed enough with it that they don't care about the other things that I'm interested in. Maybe I will come around on that . ..

I do agree that it's very hard to get sequencers and most tap tempo pedals to work out the rhythms like Soleares, Siquiriyas and don't even mention Fandangos de Huelva. I have had some success with Rumbas, Colombianas, Tangos, and limited success w/ Bulerias. Rumba is pretty much my fall back tho (besides some folk forms and classical stuff), as it doesn't really require picado.
Zube
Crowyote wrote:


Hmmmph! Spanish semantics! You might as well call it "Spanish Guitar," which dreadfully so many people do. Heck some people call Rodrigo y Gabriela flamenco guitar LOL. Anyway this whole debate has been kinda been beating a dead horse since Ottmar Liebert started introducing flamenco technique into the "New Age" sound (WTF that means lol).


Ha! I thought it was semantics too. But when you actually look here, there's clearly "classical guitars" which are meant to be played one way, which is 90% of what I see in the US. Here there is also "flamenco guitars" and they're much thinner necks, lower action, dual pickguards often- then are meant to be strummed and often play much more easily. Practicing scales and such on these is so much easier. There are also ones in-between which "split the difference" so to speak, where the box is bigger and the action is high but the neck is thin, so you can play lead much easier, I guess? I had to look up Rodrigo y Gabriela, LOL. I've only ever seen "flamenco" guitars in the States besides my wife's a few times; in shops in NY, touring players from Spain, and one folk guy. Sorry if this is old hat to you- maybe others reading might not be familiar with it.

Crowyote wrote:

I do agree that it's very hard to get sequencers and most tap tempo pedals to work out the rhythms like Soleares, Siquiriyas and don't even mention Fandangos de Huelva. I have had some success with Rumbas, Colombianas, Tangos, and limited success w/ Bulerias. Rumba is pretty much my fall back tho (besides some folk forms and classical stuff), as it doesn't really require picado.


I mean, you CAN do it. It's just a pain and you sit there with the DAW and it sucks. But you can easily do many of the Bulerias and such with Euclidean sequencers. The players here are usually not interested in linking up to a clock in any way, as the song is like water, not bricks in a wall. I think getting inspired by this, and thinking of things in a bricks vs water approach has made the whole enterprise of incorporating these rhythms in my own music (in simple ways!) a whole lot easier.
chaosick
Zube wrote:
I live in the south of Spain where flamenco is the dominant music. You're all not alone, while I don't play flamenco, definitely do a lot of classical guitar and live percussion going with, or going into, the modular, synths and pedals.

There is generally a distaste for any electronic instruments, really, in the flamenco world, beyond the electric bass guitar, and even that is forbidden by many traditionalists. It's also kind of hard to work in flamenco time signatures on some sequencers.

Don't have anything done enough to share, but I'm working a few tracks with very flamenco rhythms. And I'm almost done with an ambient/noise piece based around envelope following and effecting field recordings of the Easter Holy Week rituals. So maybe not classical guitar itself- but flamenco influenced? dunno.

Also need to chime in as an American ex-pat, very funny that both Chaosick and Crowyote, you both use "classical guitar" and "flamenco guitar" interchangeably... shame on you, they're two completely different things here in flamencoland!


Yes, I know they are, but I mentioned both to appeal to the widest possible audience. Personally I find most classical guitarists have little to no understanding or exposure to flamenco, which has long ago been more what I identify with (long live Paco).
GovernorSilver
Moar flamenco guitar-modular fusion music!!! Rockin' Banana!
chaosick
GovernorSilver wrote:
Moar flamenco guitar-modular fusion music!!! Rockin' Banana!


Yep, check out my stuff, album coming soon: https://soundcloud.com/chaosnick
Mr. Mulcahy
That would be interesting. I do use one from time to time for certain pieces
Spivkurl
I also play classical guitar in combination with things such as modular synth, vintage organs, and circuit bent instruments. Came across this thread when looking for a place to ask about recommendations for strings, since I need a new set. My wife and I have been working up to a reunion of our group, which had it's songs mostly written on acoustic bass and guitar, but were completed as what we called "industrial techno."

I have a collaboration on my last LP which demonstrates this a bit, but I can't share the link, since looperman.com is running updates at this moment...

But, if anyone has a recommendation for strings, especially low to medium tension, I would love to hear it. I'm leaning towards something from the LaBella line such as 413p. The only thing I've used on this guitar, which is pretty crap, is Ernie Ball with the black nylon. I think it could perform better, as these weakened pretty fast. I fashioned custom ebony saddle and nut for this guitar, and I want to find strings to compliment it. I'm sure that the break angle from the saddle is partly to blame for the stress and breakage of a string, and I will be improving that aspect before installing the new strings.

EDIT... okay, I got to that song link...
https://www.looperman.com/tracks/detail/171837
Crowyote
I'm a high tension string guy.

I really like the new carbon strings by D'addario and the Vivace's by La Bella, but the new material is just naturally higher tension while having smaller diameter.

For Bass strings you just can't beat the LaBella Argento pure silver strings . . . but they will cause some pickups/systems to feedback with wolf notes.

In general, D'addario and LaBella are more precise than other companies due to their QC.

I will never play Savarez or Aquila strings again, because their tone is so colored and their intonation so fraught with inaccuracies.
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Guitars, Basses, Amps & FX  
Page 1 of 1
Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group