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mixing in a shipping container
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Author mixing in a shipping container
timelifemethrave
I currently have my studio in a repurposed shipping container, it's roughly 18ft x 8ft x 8ft.. from what I've been able to gather online, it's not quite ideal for mixing. fortunately though, I'm not micing anything in there, I'm recording drum machines and synthesizers straight into the mixer. nonetheless I'm still having a hard time EQing and putting a mix together. any suggestions as to what I could do to treat or shape the room to make it sound a little better in there?
meatcliff
oh man what a nightmare.

where do you have your monitors setup? aiming down the container, or aiming towards a long side?

I'd hang as many blankets/furniture pads as possible along the length of the container. You want to kill reflections/fluttering/echo, and if it's the corrugated type walls there'll be plenty of that. I'd also try to block off corners with blankets/pads to keep bass resonance down. That's probably as good as it'll get.

I'd get some nice head phones too wink
stk
http://containerstudios.com/

https://www.gearslutz.com/board/photo-diaries-recording-studio-constru ction-projects/838881-my-shipping-container-studio-build-lots-pictures .html

https://renaissanceronin.wordpress.com/2009/03/13/the-many-faces-of-a- shipping-container-recording-studio-in-a-box/


It can be done, but you'll want to spend some time reading up on, and then building, some good acoustic treatment thumbs up

cheers
smithknows
703 insulation.
Wrap it in breathable fabric.
Apply to every surface smile
drox
http://www.monkeymarc.org/solar/#soundsystem
JAO
after applying the necessary acoustic treatment, you might want to go the rest of the way with room correction software.
timelifemethrave
I'm determined to make it work, at least as well as I can! thanks for the links and advice.
dubonaire
Daniel Avery seems to manage:

goiks
among other things, open the huge doors fully when you mix.
Dofkev
Photos please
felixer
stk wrote:
http://containerstudios.com/

https://www.gearslutz.com/board/photo-diaries-recording-studio-constru ction-projects/838881-my-shipping-container-studio-build-lots-pictures .html

https://renaissanceronin.wordpress.com/2009/03/13/the-many-faces-of-a- shipping-container-recording-studio-in-a-box/


building, some good acoustic treatment thumbs up

cheers

smithknows wrote:

Apply to every surface smile

never apply anything to all surfaces! even in a small room (which is what it is) you want some dispersion/diffusion and some dampening ...
SOS magazine had a good series about studio acoustics ...
but i'm sure it can be done cool unless you play very loud. then it might be difficult to hide the metal resonances. or you would have to go on the outside and cover the whole thing (except obviously some entrance) with sand/soil. also consider cutting a window in the shell, maybe the top? ... working in natural/daylight is so much nicer imho ...
and yeah, getting some good headphones is always useful. in fact most music nowadays, i'm sure, is heard over 'phones and not speakers.
PISS.EXE
Mixing on headphones is not only a bad idea but a dumb one too. At least mixing on headphones without taking speakers into the question at all.
rockthomas
I have experience with about a half dozen different types of converted trailers. Are they the same as what you have? I don't know. The older ones are really good, the floors were usually wood, almost like cork. The walls and ceilings had ridges with insulation built in, and while not perfect, the irregular walls would eat up sound. You had to yell from one end to the other to be heard. The newer ones had a rubberized floor that was more reflective, but still fairly better than an empty normal room. Adding some 703 or equivalent as mentioned above would be easy to hang. I'd actually go with roxul and stuff it into all the crevices. It's more pliable and you will lose less space. Rigid foam would waste a lot of space in this setting because of the contours of a trailer. The real problem with trailers is outside noise and heat. If I had one I'd probable bury it and work underground.
wsy
Also, be careful what insulation you use, especially if it has large coverage.

Reason is that a studio fire with large amounts of "fast" material will spread very, very fast; you might escape but your gear will all
be literally toast - and so will all of your recorded tracks.....

That's why coarse chunky sprayed-on plaster acoustic finish is so popular - it's fireproof. It's not great compared to foams, but
it won't spread fire or contribute energy or outgas cyanides in case of a fire.

Good luck and be safe! Dead Banana Dead Banana Dead Banana

- Bill
felixer
PISS.EXE wrote:
Mixing on headphones is not only a bad idea but a dumb one too. At least mixing on headphones without taking speakers into the question at all.

ah, the expert speaks ... mind you that most music nowadays is heard on headphones. i even got me some cheapo earbuds to check compatibility. and i have some great speakers ... i wish everyone had speakers like that. but alas ... it doesn't seem a priority anymore with most people huh?
kirkwoodwest
Dofkev wrote:
Photos please

YES photoes.
CopperHydra
wsy wrote:
Also, be careful what insulation you use, especially if it has large coverage.


Make sure any fabric you might use to decorate walls or cover the floor is fireproof as well.
Petesasqwax
PISS.EXE wrote:
Mixing on headphones is not only a bad idea but a dumb one too. At least mixing on headphones without taking speakers into the question at all.


I've no idea if he still does as I've not spoken to him in a while, but legendary UK sound engineer, No Sleep Nigel, mixed almost exclusive on Sennheiser HD 650s. If you know your reference material properly and A-B frequently, there's no reason not to. Of course you will play things through different speakers/headphones/car stereos etc. to check the mixes in different environments, but there's no reason whatsoever that mixing is either a "bad idea" or a "dumb one"
felixer
for setting a precise stereo picture i always use headphones. the only thing you can't really judge is the low-end ...
flo
lol
dadaudio
Even on YouTube

Container Studio

Designed by John Sayers
CopperHydra
Shipping containers are rectangular which amplify standing waves in the corners. In a large circular room you don't have corners. Mixing in the middle of something like a yurt would be a step up acoustically especially if it were some place super quiet out in the country without noise. That includes both mechanical (cars) and natural (wind).

In your current situation you may or may not be experiencing power issues.

http://www.recordingmag.com/resources/resourceDetail/139.html


If you can't mix anywhere else then read up on acoustics, analyze the room, and treat it.
wsy
CopperHydra wrote:
Shipping containers are rectangular which amplify standing waves in the corners. In a large circular room you don't have corners. Mixing in the middle of something like a yurt would be a step up acoustically especially if it were some place super quiet out in the country without noise. That includes both mechanical (cars) and natural (wind).

In your current situation you may or may not be experiencing power issues.

http://www.recordingmag.com/resources/resourceDetail/139.html


If you can't mix anywhere else then read up on acoustics, analyze the room, and treat it.


Hey, I know Scott (the author). I hadn't seen that article before, it's excellent! Thanks!
felixer
CopperHydra wrote:
Shipping containers are rectangular which amplify standing waves in the corners. In a large circular room you don't have corners. Mixing in the middle of something like a yurt would be a step up acoustically

you can fake a yurt by mounting plates of adobe inside. they also make'm mixed with woodchips for larger structural strength ...
the standing waves come from parallel wall, not corners. in a circular room you have one huge standing wave in the middle where the distance to all the walls is equal. you get a sort of gated reverb there. i know that from standing in the middle of an old volcano: very strange sound, never thought i'd hear that in a natural space ...
dubonaire
felixer wrote:
CopperHydra wrote:
Shipping containers are rectangular which amplify standing waves in the corners. In a large circular room you don't have corners. Mixing in the middle of something like a yurt would be a step up acoustically

you can fake a yurt by mounting plates of adobe inside. they also make'm mixed with woodchips for larger structural strength ...
the standing waves come from parallel wall, not corners. in a circular room you have one huge standing wave in the middle where the distance to all the walls is equal. you get a sort of gated reverb there. i know that from standing in the middle of an old volcano: very strange sound, never thought i'd hear that in a natural space ...


Yes, of course you can get standing waves in circular rooms. Anyone who's played in a kiddies circular pool can tell you that. It's also how quantum models of electrons work. I wouldn't mind living in a yurt though.
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