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WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

New module coming: Flanger
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Oakley Sound Systems  
Author New module coming: Flanger
Synthbuilder


More information, including sound samples, will be on the project webpage as I get time to put stuff up:

http://www.oakleysound.com/flanger.htm

It's actually an analogue delay line using two 3207 BBDs operated in an unconventional manner which can create delays between 0.5mS and 15mS. I wondered whether 'flanger' was the right name for this module since it has no internal LFO and can be used for other duties including a very nice chorus and real time vibrato effect. You may wish to call it something else if you desire.

The first run of boards had a few errors. One of which was quite serious and requires component lead yoga and a couple of flying wires. That ain't good enough for release so a new board has been designed and is ready to be ordered for shipping late April or early May.

This board is built partly with surface mount dual op-amps, resistors, diodes and capacitors. The passives are all 0805, the ICs are SO and the diodes are SOD23. It can be soldered by hand with a standard iron and solder. Indeed, some of you may enjoy the soldering process so much you'll be wanting more SMD stuff from me.

Tony
eljay
Great news Tony, really looking forward to this and hopefully a few more new 5U modules over the rest of the year. Once pricing info is available I will pre-order.
Blake Smith
Exciting news. SMD resistors and caps are okay, but I haven't really got the hang of ics yet. Pins are so close I end up with a solder bridge or two to clean up every time. Maybe it will click for me when I build one of these...
Paradigm X
oooh exciting!

i may have to give it a whirl

i bought a cheap smd practice kit from ebay, 99p free delivery! god knows how they can sell so cheap. not tried it yet tho.

so to use it as a standard flanger youd just need an LFO ?
Synthbuilder
Paradigm X wrote:
... so to use it as a standard flanger youd just need an LFO ?


Yes. Triangle wave will give you the traditional flanger sweep sound. Although you can use an envelope follower or any other CV. Both negative and positive feedback pathways are supported. The MIX output is the one to use here. It can also self oscillate if needed.

For chorus you'd also use triangle wave LFO but with a slightly longer delay time and less modulation depth. Like the flanger the MIX output is the one to use. A sine wave LFO is useful for vibrato but this time you need to use the DELAY output.

Tony
mmeixner
Synthbuilder wrote:


More information, including sound samples, will be on the project webpage as I get time to put stuff up:

http://www.oakleysound.com/flanger.htm

It's actually an analogue delay line using two 3207 BBDs operated in an unconventional manner which can create delays between 0.5mS and 15mS. I wondered whether 'flanger' was the right name for this module since it has no internal LFO and can be used for other duties including a very nice chorus and real time vibrato effect. You may wish to call it something else if you desire.

[...]

This board is built partly with surface mount dual op-amps, resistors, diodes and capacitors. The passives are all 0805, the ICs are SO and the diodes are SOD23. It can be soldered by hand with a standard iron and solder. Indeed, some of you may enjoy the soldering process so much you'll be wanting more SMD stuff from me.

Tony


Yes! Instant order (maybe 2) as soon as this goes "official".

I personally find SO ICs easier to solder than resistors our caps, just because the parts are bigger.

Looking forward!
mmeixner
Synthbuilder wrote:
Paradigm X wrote:
... so to use it as a standard flanger youd just need an LFO ?


Yes. Triangle wave will give you the traditional flanger sweep sound. Although you can use an envelope follower or any other CV. Both negative and positive feedback pathways are supported. The MIX output is the one to use here. It can also self oscillate if needed.

For chorus you'd also use triangle wave LFO but with a slightly longer delay time and less modulation depth. Like the flanger the MIX output is the one to use. A sine wave LFO is useful for vibrato but this time you need to use the DELAY output.

Tony


As always with Tony's modules, this is well thought out and will be immensely flexible and inspiring to use
nanners
mmeixner
Now since the first detailed description is online:

http://www.oakleysound.com/flanger.htm

I'm already thinking about the many possibilities ... a very effective design this is. Can't wait ...

Coffee Addiction FTW
ppkstat
Very excited about this both in terms of function and assembly.
Synthbuilder
[s]https://soundcloud.com/takla-makan/flanger-track[/s]

Quick track recorded using an Oakley modular to showcase the Oakley Flanger module. Lead line is one VCO passed through a DLF filter, Discrete VCA and onto the Flanger. Bass in the second half is the same patch but this time the filter is being swept with a VRG and the flanger module is used to create a deep chorus sound. Some reverb used on the leadline and plucked bell sound.
Synthbuilder
[s]https://soundcloud.com/takla-makan/flanger-demo-1[/s]

Simple traditional VCO-VCF-VCA patch. First part is completely dry, and then other parts sent into the Flanger module. Settings changed manually as the same simple sequence goes round and round. Second and third show the chorus sound. Fourth bit decreases the delay time to give the classic flanging - increasing the feedback creates a deep flanger sound. Fifth bit is another flanger but uses negative feedback. Sixth part is manually altering the controls for excessive effects, firstly with positive feedback and then negative feedback.
Synthbuilder
[s]https://soundcloud.com/takla-makan/flanger-demo-2[/s]

Standard VCO-VCF-VCA patch using the flanger module to shift the pitch. Firstly you hear the pitch being bent by an EG triggered from the gate on a simple riff, then a filtered constant pitch sawtooth being pitch shifted by a LFO - firstly subtle and then more extreme. The final samples in this collection are filtered white noise being flanged. The delay time and feedback controls are being manually altered. The first part you hear is positive feedback and the second is negative feedback.
mmeixner
still can't wait Guinness ftw!
Stereotactixxx
Can't believe I missed this announcement. woah
A couple of these and a quadrature LFO will probably make an awesome stereo chorus.

I really hope Krisp1 will add these to his production.
Synthbuilder
Stereotactixxx wrote:
A couple of these and a quadrature LFO will probably make an awesome stereo chorus.


I've not tried with a quadrature LFO but using just a traditional triangle LFO with one Flanger module set for positive CV modulation and the other Flanger module with negative CV modulation will give you the classic Roland chorus sound.

Tony
kecked
I would love to see a full line of smd boards. That way one board is both euro and 5 high. Maybe leave some through hole where it matters for caps and other devices that affect the sound. But for most circuits it doesn't matter. Uses less power too. Let's you offer multiple functions on one board. More space for more tie points....love it! Oh yea and I'll take two of those modules.

You could offer prepopulate smd parts. Board house does that pretty cheap.
Leverkusen
Hm, I don't know - just started a bit of SMD soldering in Eurorack and it does not feel like being joyful on the long run. So this is probably not for me.

Nevertheless the Flanger seems to sound nice.
househead
Great news!!...i'm up for 2 of these thumbs up
Synthbuilder
Just waiting on a dual gang 10K pot from Banzai to test the new board issue. And whilst waiting on this rather blustery May Day Holiday I shall be continuing to write up the Builder's and User Guides.

Boards should be ready for sale before the end of the week - I hope.

Tony
Synthbuilder


PCBs are now available to order. Full project documentation will be ready in the next couple of days.

Also:

I also have a completed issue 1 prototype board available for purchase. This works exactly like the new issue 2 and is fully functional. It does however have a couple of issues. Firstly, to get it to work properly I have had to cludge a couple of wires and resistors (see lower picture). Secondly, the I/O headers that go to the Sock6 or socket field have been wired the wrong way around. That is, pin 1 now goes to pin 8, pin 2 goes to pin 7, etc. Both these slip ups have been corrected in the new issue 2 but if anyone would like this one then the price is 120GBP plus the usual shipping costs. Panel, switches, sockets, LEDs and board interconnects are not included - it's just the pre-populated board.





Tony
Synthbuilder
Pre-populated board now sold.

Tony
ppkstat
I am planning to build one in the near future and I am currently sourcing components. Will this do for the tempco?
http://export.farnell.com/citec-te-connectivity/lt7339002a1k0jte/resis tor-temperature-sensing-1k/dp/1174315

Unfortunately is the only one I can find that is under specifications and I have to buy 10 of them.
Synthbuilder
ppkstat wrote:
Will this do for the tempco?
http://export.farnell.com/citec-te-connectivity/lt7339002a1k0jte/resis tor-temperature-sensing-1k/dp/1174315


That's the one I used. You can use an ordinary 1K resistor if you are not too bothered about a very small amount of drift in the delay time.

Tony
Leverkusen
Just wanted to rectify my above post on this. I did built the flanger, it was an interesting and challenging project but not too hard.

It's a great module and besides the usual flanging it also does audio FM, which then may sound like this (if one is in a silly mood, actually):

[s]https://soundcloud.com/leverkusen/oakley-flanger-fm-iii[/s]
Schlumpfhut
Leverkusen wrote:
Just wanted to rectify my above post on this. I did built the flanger, it was an interesting and challenging project but not too hard.

It's a great module and besides the usual flanging it also does audio FM, which then may sound like this (if one is in a silly mood, actually):

[s]https://soundcloud.com/leverkusen/oakley-flanger-fm-iii[/s]


Silly mood or not - sounds very good. Nice job. SlayerBadger!
eljay
After a bit of a DIY delay I've finally started to make the Flanger module, only my second SMD project and the first was tiny in comparison. My technique is improving with practice so hopefully another excellent Oakley module will shortly be sitting proudly in my rack.

I notice from the board photos there is some inconsistency in whether you have filled a via or not. I'm assuming for an SMD board it's still good practice to fill all vias? Is it also 'good practice' to fill those vias that are under ICs prior to fitting the IC itself?
Synthbuilder
eljay wrote:
I notice from the board photos there is some inconsistency in whether you have filled a via or not. I'm assuming for an SMD board it's still good practice to fill all vias? Is it also 'good practice' to fill those vias that are under ICs prior to fitting the IC itself?

There is no real need to fill in vias any more. Back in the day, and because I'm of that generation, plated through holes were a bit hit and miss and soldering them could help maintain connectivity when the board was flexed. These days there is no need to do this. I do still recommend doing it - if you can - since if you are water washing your board it stops the water from sneaking into the holes and possibly corroding the plating if it doesn't dry fast enough.

That said soldering via holes when the via connects to the 0V plane(s) is not easy. The large area of the copper plane will steal the heat from your soldering iron tip so any applied solder will not stay melted long enough to flow into the hole properly. The soldered part of the board surface around the via hole is not big enough to allow fast heat transfer with a iron unless you pre-heat your board. The reason some of the via holes are filled is that they do not connect to the plane but simply to other tracks. The smaller copper areas of individual tracks do not steal the heat away from the joint so readily and allow a solid fill.

So feel free to fill the unused holes but only if it results in a nice filled hole. Otherwise leave them be. If you do water wash then make sure the unsoldered holes are empty of water. Just slap the underside of the board onto a dry cloth which should dislodge any water.

Tony
terjewinther
Thanks Tony, this was a good read and good advice. Very good update on the matter.
eljay

My Flanger, tested calibrated and completed. As can be seen from the photo a few lessons learned from my first significant SMD project. The main lesson being how not to remove an SMD IC and secondly, having removed half the solder pads and adjoining tracks, how to successfully wire a replacement chip back into the PCB.

Very much a challenge for me this module, there were a number of faults, all of them were eventually tracked down to dry solder joints on SMD chips (five in total!) so clearly my SMD soldering hadn't improved as much as I had hoped, but I learnt a lot. From tracking signal paths through the schematics to understanding a bit more about how my oscilloscope works. The best part of a day spent debugging and fixing the board but all in all a positive if frustrating at times, experience.

Now all that's left is to try it out, perhaps I'll have a rest first!
Jim the Oldbie
Hello all, new to this interesting forum.

Can anyone give info on the tracking of the Flanger module? I read & understand that it's not expected to track like a VCO, but the userguide mentions a useful range. Could anyone elaborate? For example, can it be made to track 1V/oct fairly well over a few octaves, something like an average VCF?

I'd like to get into pipe modeling effects & the like, and if this will work for that sort of thing, I'd be very interested in 1 or 2 of them.

Thanks for your time.
Synthbuilder
Jim the Oldbie wrote:
For example, can it be made to track 1V/oct fairly well over a few octaves, something like an average VCF?

The tracking is workable over two octaves only. Very much worse than your average filter. Also it has a tendency to drift a little immediately after a CV change due to self heating of the driver transistor in the exponential convertor. This is a nice effect when the unit is used as a flanger, chorus and even a notch filter but not helpful when doing more precise analogue modelling techniques.

Tony
Jim the Oldbie
Thanks Tony for this info.

Meanwhile, I've discovered something in the gear closet I'd forgotten I had: A Bozak model 900 "Celeste." This was originally meant as a stereo "ambience enhancer," basically L-R + delay to the rear speakers. It uses 4 Reticon SAD1024s, and I think it's crying out to be reborn as a stereo chorus/ flanger. I think I'll see what I can do with it.

Thanks again for your reply.
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