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WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

New Cassette Releases?
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> General Gear Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next [all]
Author New Cassette Releases?
ritchiedrums
Cassette? seriously, i just don't get it

What am I missing here?
I am a Huge Vinyl Fan, but Cassette??

What is the attraction to this sound quality?
I didn't like them in the early 1980's hmmm.....
solaris
chrome cassette tapes can sound quite good.
normal (type I) are not worth IMO, tons of hiss.
jesselucas
For me, it's an easy way to make a mix from vinyl or record a program from the radio. I don't have a CD-R or a simple way to digitize vinyl so I'll use cassette for this. I also don't enjoy streaming services. I feel it has too many options and I find myself searching for music rather than listening. Which is a reason I enjoy physical media.

For musicians/bands it's a low cost solution to have something to sell. The price to press vinyl or cds can be very expensive and they usually have minimum quantities. You can make 100 tapes made for cheap, throw in a Bandcamp download code and you're good to go.
sellanraa
To build on previous points - cassettes are financially practical. I think there was a real surge in cassettes in the underground when there was a surge in 'vinyl is back!' That's when major labels began clogging pressing plants with Rolling Stones deluxe reissue sorts of releases and basically squeezed out the people who had kept those pressing plants alive for the previous 20+ years.

So, vinyl is increasingly impractical and cassettes are the solution to the problem.
Tumulishroomaroom
Yep most people don't buy cassettes to listen to cassettes, they buy cassettes to support the artist and have a nice tangible object and listen the record on bandcamp or from the downloads that came with it.

I didn't see the point before but I do now. It's nice to support people's music.
ritchiedrums
Tumulishroomaroom wrote:
Yep most people don't buy cassettes to listen to cassettes, they buy cassettes to support the artist and have a nice tangible object and listen the record on bandcamp or from the downloads that came with it.

I didn't see the point before but I do now. It's nice to support people's music.



I would rather buy the CD.... screaming goo yo
Petesasqwax
Tumulishroomaroom wrote:
Yep most people don't buy cassettes to listen to cassettes, they buy cassettes to support the artist and have a nice tangible object and listen the record on bandcamp or from the downloads that came with it.

I didn't see the point before but I do now. It's nice to support people's music.


Yeah, that'd how I feel completely. I buy tapes and my car stereo does have a tape player so I play tapes too, but the reason I like them is I want to support the artists and I want to do it in a way that presents me with a physical product.

From an artists perspective, having released things on vinyl and CD before, releasing things on digital formats just doesn't feel like it's "out" somehow so working with cassette labels means I still have that tangible release that I still crave without the costs of vinyl.
heckadecimal69
I find complaining about it makes you look and feel way cooler.
ritchiedrums
Hmmmmm...
Complaining?

Trying to make sense of it.
I can understand wanting to support artists.
Not really getting the buying a cassette & never listening thing.
I happen to have a couple of albums by local bands here from the 1980's
that were only released on cassette.
I have a hard time listening to them.

Just want to hear the reasons people are buying these.
So far it is interesting....
jesselucas
ritchiedrums wrote:
I would rather buy the CD.... screaming goo yo

I was given a CD for the holidays and realized I didn't even own an optical drive to play it in cry

Sometime in the last few years they removed them from MacBooks. Same for the tv, we only have little boxes that stream video. It took me by surprise but the concept owning music seems like it is going away for the majority of people.
Xmit
Quote:
I buy tapes and my car stereo does have a tape player so I play tapes too, but the reason I like them is I want to support the artists and I want to do it in a way that presents me with a physical product.

From an artists perspective, having released things on vinyl and CD before, releasing things on digital formats just doesn't feel like it's "out" somehow so working with cassette labels means I still have that tangible release that I still crave without the costs of vinyl.


yeah - that's it exactly. I have stuff out on little tape label called Concrete - all the artists support each other, there are associated gig nights & stuff too & it therefore feels like a more tangible enterprise all round.

whilst we're here - plug : https://concretetapes.wordpress.com/
https://concretetapes.bandcamp.com/ cool

Having said all that, I'm also on the new A Year In the Country set of releases, which is mainly CD based ... all the artwork & packaging on that stuff is fantastic, so I think there is something to do with the 'physical' nature of releases per se.
http://ayearinthecountry.co.uk/
D_Bowman
You pretty much have four options for releasing something:

1. Digital download
2. Vinyl
3. CD
4. Cassette

Many musicians like to have a physical release to go with digital download. CDs seem more worthless than cassettes to me when you have a digital download available. It's the same thing! At least cassette has a different character, if low-fi. And vinyl is really expensive with long wait lists. I personally like the character of cassette for most types of electronic music too. The thing I wouldn't understand is if you did cassette only and no digital download. That would be ridiculous and nearly no one does that.
Petesasqwax
Xmit wrote:
I have stuff out on little tape label called Concrete - all the artists support each other, there are associated gig nights & stuff too & it therefore feels like a more tangible enterprise all round.

whilst we're here - plug : https://concretetapes.wordpress.com/
https://concretetapes.bandcamp.com/ cool

Having said all that, I'm also on the new A Year In the Country set of releases, which is mainly CD based ... all the artwork & packaging on that stuff is fantastic, so I think there is something to do with the 'physical' nature of releases per se.
http://ayearinthecountry.co.uk/




Furious! Outrage!

(I look forward to checking it later cool )[/img]
Petesasqwax
D_Bowman wrote:
You pretty much have four options for releasing something:

1. Digital download
2. Vinyl
3. CD
4. Cassette

Many musicians like to have a physical release to go with digital download. CDs seem more worthless than cassettes to me when you have a digital download available. It's the same thing! At least cassette has a different character, if low-fi. And vinyl is really expensive with long wait lists. I personally like the character of cassette for most types of electronic music too. The thing I wouldn't understand is if you did cassette only and no digital download. That would be ridiculous and nearly no one does that.


Yeah, I would agree with absolutely all of that (although I do know people who release tapes without download codes I presume as some kind of anti-digital statement perhaps?)
GovernorSilver
As others have mentioned, artists release stuff on cassette because it's way cheaper than producing CDs or vinyl. The math is not that complicated.

You may have noticed that after you play a show and people like what you did, they tend to ask you if they can buy your music on some physical medium. That's where having cassettes, CDs, and/or vinyl on hand comes into play.

On the consumer side of the producer-consumer equation, I have a small house and too much stuff already. So I ask for the artist's Bandcamp page or other online means of accessing their music. The disadvantage of this approach is if I don't remember to write down the artist's name or whatever, I forget to go buy their stuff online.

Sometimes there's no way to get the download code without buying a record/cassette, so if I really like the artist enough I'll get it.
slow_riot
the good thing about cassettes is that people can moan all they like about the medium or the music itself and you can still print up enough to make your money back. For experimental or obscure music there is absolutely no way you can guarantee turning over 300 units which is how many you need to sell from a vinyl run using manufactured techniques to break even (lathe cuts etc are a different realm that do seem to be becoming more readily available).

some music obviously doesn't suit the inherent grunginess of the format, but I think a lot of things do.
JoshuaTSP
All I know is, whatever the hip and in style medium to release music on......is something that I can't play in my car. lol

Had a tape player, CDs are in.
Have a CD player, digital and cassette are in.
Never had a car with 1/8" input or bluetooth. Dislike purchasing digital only.
Records just don't play well in a vehicle at all. Mr. Green
Petesasqwax
Also - for me, personally, at least - releasing tapes is just kind of fun.
DickMarker
Love cassettes, have put out many releases (with download code natch) on the format.

Can understand the bewilderment though, they're somewhat archaic. They can however sound really good when done well and used on good decks (which are very easy to pick up cheaply in this digital era). Personally, I just love the whole mechanical side of them - perhaps somewhat nostalgic of me - the spools, the tape itself, the magnetism and how it all affects the sound.

Of course, it's all rather niche, isn't it - both the format and most of the music delivered on it - but that's why they're so appealing. Feels very underground, very out of the mainstream - cocking a snoot at the status quo. And if you find your market, you'll offload them a whole lot quicker than you might with the same numbers on cd.

Lastly, and I can't exactly say why, there something sort of beautiful in enjoying sound on a format that will eventually go the way of everything and decay.
jesselucas
DickMarker wrote:
They can however sound really good when done well and used on good decks (which are very easy to pick up cheaply in this digital era)


thumbs up

Acquiring a good tape deck really changed it all for me. Making and playing tapes is a joy. Bought it from a local place the specializes in high end audio repair called Magnetic Tape Recorder (https://www.facebook.com/Magnetic.Tape.Recorder/). If you're ever in Louisville, KY it's definitely worth checking out. Great people.

Plus, for any 80's kid, we have a great reason to find our old walkman's and use them again!
1n
From an artist point of view, I like CDs and cassettes because I can produce them myself.

This infographic explains the wider picture: https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2011/11/how-musicians-rea lly-make-money-in-one-long-graph/249267/

It's fun and satisfying and worth more all round to make it yourself.
Unborn Gore
Common perception may be different, but cassettes actually last longer than CDs. You can toss them all over the car, all over your room, etc, and still play and enjoy them years later.

CDs are too volatile. I would rather have mp3s and a tape.
wildfrontiers
Just want to echo the positive sentiment on cassettes.

They do sound surprisingly good, especially if you take care of them (like not leaving them in your hot car all summer). There's a certain character to them.

For small-time artists like myself, they can be made easily and on a budget. Not to mention, the turn-around time is pretty quick. It's great to have a physical and analog release available, and as others have said - nice decks can be had for pretty cheap. Certainly less expensive than a high end turntable.

Doing a small run of vinyl in a timely and budget-conscious manner is just not possible for most independent artists.

I don't see the point of CDs anymore. Especially if someone is just going to burn it to their phone or whatever anyway.
Tumulishroomaroom
Unborn Gore wrote:
Common perception may be different, but cassettes actually last longer than CDs. You can toss them all over the car, all over your room, etc, and still play and enjoy them years later.

CDs are too volatile. I would rather have mp3s and a tape.

This plus the fact that it's hard to think out of the box in terms of packaging with a cd (even silkscreened/die cut whatever). Crystal cases are horrendous, digipacks too; I don't know... it's a format that has become less and less appealing to me over the years. I've sold most on them on Discogs apart from a few cherished pieces.
mutierend
I have a Nakamichi RX-303 tape deck and about 300 tapes, most of them from the 1980s and 1990s. I like the richness of the sound. Most people who think of tapes never listened on good equipment. The same is true of vinyl. People think of loud needle drops, scratches, pops, and so on. On good equipment, it sounds good.

I also love that my Nak deck spits the tape out in order to flip it.
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