MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index
 FAQ & Terms of UseFAQ & Terms Of Use   Wiggler RadioMW Radio   Muff Wiggler TwitterTwitter   Support the site @ PatreonPatreon 
 SearchSearch   RegisterSign up   Log inLog in 
WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

Recording to computer kills the mood
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Production Techniques Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next [all]
Author Recording to computer kills the mood
zolar_czakl
It's been like a month since I've recorded anything. Finally tonight I get some okay sounds out of my modular so decided to record it into Ableton Live Lite which has been working fine. I now have a little Allen and Heath mixer, so running everything through there then into my computer via USB. Headphone out on mixer sounds fine while recording, though the levels were a bit low in Ableton. On p!ayback there's a bunch of noise in there. So fucking annoying.

I swear, firing up my computer and waiting for Ableton to finally load already takes the fun out of it. But then to end up with a worthless recording is fucking discouraging. Guess I need to muck with all the levels and get the setup correct every goddamn time. No wonder I rarely bother to record. It really kills the mood. Also sometimes I get anxious and rush or just fuck up a sound because of the hassle of recording. How do you deal with mixing and recording to where you can minimize disruption to your creative process?
gimber
I feel the same way, and wish I didn't because I'd be theoretically getting much better recordings if I just dealt with my motu and ableton.

Usually instead I use an old zoom field recorder hooked to my mixer's tape outs for stereo recording and a jamhub tracker on the mixer's inserts for 16-track recording when I feel like it's more important. There are definitely better options out there but these were pretty cheap and are working well enough for now.
zolar_czakl
Glad I'm not alone. I'm not a serious producer and don't have much experience in that regard. I just love my little hobby and like to learn new things but was feeling discouraged tonight.
junglll
My favorite way to record is definitely to my 4 track cassette machine. I demo everything on it, but usually finish stuff on the computer waah
commodorejohn
I dunno about computerless recording, because I have no experience with it, but I personally keep it bare-bones with a separate MIDI sequencer program (WinJammer) and multitrack audio editor (Audacity) because these big all-in-one-der whiz-bang-duzitall suites just feel like the ultimate gilded cage. There's still awkwardness in the workflow and hassles when a good take clips out at just this one point, but it's a whole hell of a lot better than sitting there staring at this Magic Solution Program and waiting for it to automate my inspiration.
sparood
Recording to computer kills the mood -> don't record to a computer.

I never have problems with recording with the computer, but I only record to stereo and never have to deal with midi or more than 2 channels so my digital setup is stupid easy.
zolar_czakl
commodorejohn wrote:
I dunno about computerless recording, because I have no experience with it, but I personally keep it bare-bones with a separate MIDI sequencer program (WinJammer) and multitrack audio editor (Audacity) because these big all-in-one-der whiz-bang-duzitall suites just feel like the ultimate gilded cage. There's still awkwardness in the workflow and hassles when a good take clips out at just this one point, but it's a whole hell of a lot better than sitting there staring at this Magic Solution Program and waiting for it to automate my inspiration.


I can definitely relate. I should look to simplify my software environment. Ableton does way more than I need since all I need for now is basically a digital tape recorder. Personally I don't find Ableton to be especially intuitive, especially since I'm not using it very often.

In line with your comment, sparood - at least for now I'm not looking to do a bunch of midi assignments or multitrack recordings with overdubs or post-production wizardry. The only post-recording actions I've done so far is the occasional fade-in or fade-out when I didn't get it right in recording. I still want to record into computer, but I just need it to be an easier process. I need an application that's​ not so resource heavy so it fires up and processes audio quicker than Ableton.
Oblivion
I had this problem when my setup was portable and impermanent. Firing up the laptop, wiring up the interface, configuring the interface . . . Ideas gone. So i used my Zoom recorder as well.

Now I have a more permanent setup, though still run by laptop, so there's some minor plugging in and re-selecting the interface if I've opened Reaper elsewhere since the last time. But otherwise, I have multitrack templates, with and without SilentWay configured, so now I can just press record and go - synced, if I like.

I get it, though. With great power, comes great responsibility. And distraction.
sparood
zolar_czakl wrote:
still want to record into computer, but I just need it to be an easier process. I need an application that's​ not so resource heavy so it fires up and processes audio quicker than Ableton.


Never used Ableton so I can't compare it to anything, but you could take a look at Reaper. It's lightweight and pretty intuitive as a recording tool.
Dcramer
I record to a Mac using Logic and a MOTU interface.
Luckily I've been around Logic long enough that recording is easy, especially just to two tracks.
Trickier to split out my modular mixes if I need to go multi track.
I always monitor through so I can hear was coming out of the puter. thumbs up
leeski
Get a tape recorder
Infinity Curve
If you are using ableton, just configure your inputs and everything, set up your tracks and save that as your default template, so it will load that whenever you start up ableton. To avoid hassle or scrambling to fire things up to snag a recording, start the computer at the start of the session so it's ready to go and recording is a button press away. Noise in the recording is likely more to do with your mixer than the computer. Get familiar with your gear and things go a lot smoother, but just setting up a template so you don't have to do it every time you start up makes a big difference.
Bataserpa
I also did not like to use computers to record. So I bought a Tascam multitrack dp-03. This is the best move I did. I am not saying the quality is better than computer (it is also digital) or easier to use, but, at least for me, it made my workflow somehow much more easy and direct.

My modular is always connected there. Just start the Tascam, arm the tracks and go. I guess deal with faders, knobs and buttons is the thing. I know I can have a computer with a midi controller to do the job but doesn't feel same.

Before that I recorded in a tascam handheld recorder Dr-40 connected in the outs of my mixer which was also nice.

There is no best way, you just need to find out what works better for you and gives the best results for your taste
systmcrsh
i like the convenience of just recording the mix out to a portable handheld. especially for just capturing ideas. i use a sony pcm-m10. i even zip-tied the remote control to my rack =)

too bad sony discontinued them confused
Muzone
I used to have this block until I finally got a decent spec laptop running and learned to use templates (Reaper, but I imagine other DAW systems have the same facility), now by the time I've turned on all the hardware the laptop is up and ready smile
LoFi Junglist
Synth voice into an Amp, mic up the amp, record non stop.

Then you have a 'field recording' you can edit and chop later.

Doesn't really work if you're doing multiple voices and drums with the rack tho.
Zube
I use the pcb-10m too. Surprised it's discontinued... It's a great little recorder.

When I multitrack, if the computer screen is bothering me, which it often is, I simply dim the screen to black.

First thing I do in the morning is power up the studio, then make coffee, by the time I'm back, everything is powered up and ready to go more or less. I used to use templates heavily but I realized I kept doing the same things and repeating myself, now the time laying the routing out "by hand" gives me a second chance to slow down and think if it's really the best signal flow for the track, saving massive amounts of time mixing.

There are a lot of older stand-alone DAWs that still sound great to this day. Depending on what you want, how many tracks, there are lots of options, and most made post-2001 will have 24bit/96k as an option. Tascam, Alesis, and Mackie made stand-alone 24-track recorders that were really great in the early 2000's. The Mackie is the one to get nowadays as you can edit on the machine with a mouse and VGA if you wanted to; the other 2 required either a DAW (Alesis) or a G4 era Mac (Tascam). The Tascam is still widely used today, in lots of applications. it just "works" as a tape-style multitrack. The Tascam 1-inch tape machines are also a good option for computer-less recording. Roland made their VS recorders but Im not sure I'd recommend those machines too heavily in 2017- even though they are massively cheap, the audio compression and clunky menus are annoying.
Rigo
I use a Yamaha MGP24X mixer, which has a USB port and can record straight to a USB stick. Now if I would just remember to put a USB stick in it, before I start thinking "that sounds nice, should have recorded it" cry
The Goob
Muzone wrote:
I used to have this block until I finally got a decent spec laptop running and learned to use templates (Reaper, but I imagine other DAW systems have the same facility), now by the time I've turned on all the hardware the laptop is up and ready smile


I agree it sounds like this may be the issue.

It really helps to have a decent (not more than 5 years old) computer to record with. Dedicate a day to learning how to set your levels so you don't get noise and build a template like others have said.

Record at no higher than -18db and you shouldn't get distortion. There's not really any reason to run higher input levels with modern digital recording equipment.

Ableton is a great creative tool for sequencing and arranging, but it's not as intuitive for linear recording. I would recommend trying Reaper since the demo is free. See if you like it better.

You could get a cassette 4-track or something like that, but be aware that format has its own limitations.
Tubefund
Any users familiar with this http://cymaticaudio.com/products/recorders-players/utrack-24

Big record and play buttons, more then enough tracks, large VU and hands on. Would this be a good alternative to put on top of a rack?
zolar_czakl
Thanks for the tips and info everyone. This really helps get me out of my "recording anxiety". I've got meaningful troubleshooting I can do in the short term, and other options to explore longer term. I hadn't even considered using a tape recorder, so that's something I'll look into. I kinda like the old-school aspect of recording to tape and it could actually be the simple process I'm looking for.
LoFi Junglist
perhaps consider a Reel-to-Reel?

You can get hours of recording on 2 ,4, 8 etc channels. set and forget for entire afternoon's worth of sessions.
Oblivion
LoFi Junglist wrote:
perhaps consider a Reel-to-Reel?

You can get hours of recording on 2 ,4, 8 etc channels. set and forget for entire afternoon's worth of sessions.


I've got an old 1/4" Teac RtR. Media is not cheap when you find it. If you know a good source, I'm all ears.
MarcelP
Infinity Curve wrote:
If you are using ableton, just configure your inputs and everything, set up your tracks and save that as your default template, so it will load that whenever you start up ableton. To avoid hassle or scrambling to fire things up to snag a recording, start the computer at the start of the session so it's ready to go and recording is a button press away. Noise in the recording is likely more to do with your mixer than the computer. Get familiar with your gear and things go a lot smoother, but just setting up a template so you don't have to do it every time you start up makes a big difference.


This -^^^

If you spend some time pre-configuring a template in Ableton and use your mixer consistently you "should" be able to: fire up the computer BEFORE you start patching and be ready to hit record after the kettle boils for your first cup of coffee. Deciding to record part way into the process is a mood killer - though I have real difficulty in rationalising why.

As an old-school magnetic tape guy I have to say - don't go down that route: a nice romantic idea but you will be introducing a whole bunch of variables and pains in the ass...tape running out just as you hit your stride for one. Worn heads, poor head to tape contact, bias-bubble, wow and flutter, distortion, tape weave, oxide shedding, wobbly bottom end (or paper thin bottom end) poor transient response, phasing, a quite audible noise floor, quite audible distortion, droopy top end with weird response bumps, how much to over-bias?.....Makes me queasy just thinking about it again....
Johnisfaster
A) Don't blame the computer for you not checking the levels first.

B) You have to learn how to have fun with some things. Using a computer one way can be boring as hell. Using it in another can be a blast.
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Production Techniques Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next [all]
Page 1 of 6
Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group