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Frankenguitars, partscasters and other bastards
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Guitars, Basses, Amps & FX Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next [all]
Author Frankenguitars, partscasters and other bastards
wsy
smetak wrote:

Man, just reading on how you were able to achieve the colour tone made my head spin!!! Amazing!

I gave mine to a friend, who is a profissional luthier, to get a translucent blue that ended up coming out dark as hell, far from what I wanted. I can't begin to imagine doing anything near to what you have done!


Strip it and try again!

I'm *considering* doing the same with my Moog Voyager Electric Blue; the "blue with sparkles" is more like "flat black with dust
specks" (I bought it used on Ebay; if I had bought it that way in person I'd probably not have bought it at all and gone for a tiger maple
or something like that.)

It's your _instrument_. If it doesn't make you smile just thinking about it, then you're doing it wrong.

- Bill
smetak
wsy wrote:
smetak wrote:

Man, just reading on how you were able to achieve the colour tone made my head spin!!! Amazing!

I gave mine to a friend, who is a profissional luthier, to get a translucent blue that ended up coming out dark as hell, far from what I wanted. I can't begin to imagine doing anything near to what you have done!


Strip it and try again!

I'm *considering* doing the same with my Moog Voyager Electric Blue; the "blue with sparkles" is more like "flat black with dust
specks" (I bought it used on Ebay; if I had bought it that way in person I'd probably not have bought it at all and gone for a tiger maple
or something like that.)

It's your _instrument_. If it doesn't make you smile just thinking about it, then you're doing it wrong.

- Bill


Yeah, you're right there, mate - but this paint thing is one tough nut to crack! Just to get the paint job done, my friend had to do the thing twice over and had to buy some sort of imported paint gun. A real pain! But been rethinking it - really didn't like the finish, way too dark - and spent a good deal on the Gotoh/ Wilkenson hardware and rewiring - the set of Bare Knuckles was incredibly expensive. And the Godin neck and body are great - very nicely cut. A very nice strat indeed.
Sleipnir
Sinamsis wrote:
I'm wondering if there are other equally ill people here like me.

I think you are far from the only one with that sickness. :-)
I've been playing guitar since I was 6 (getting on *cough*45 years*cough*), and hacking at them since I was 14. Making a guitar more 'a part of you' by customizing it is a beautiful thing.

Lots have come and gone over the years, but these are still around (not counting ones with only minor hardware changes) in basically chronological order:

My Strat. I built this to be my Desert Island guitar - it can do pretty much anything decently, and some things incredible.

Started as a ~2001 American Deluxe with a clear Ash body and about 1/16" thick poly coating on the fingerboard.
It's gone through a few different bodies, currenly Swamp Ash with a satin Walnut stain.
After years of hating the fingerboard, I scraped the thick glossy poly off the front of the neck with a razor blade; now it feels amazing. I'm letting it get a bit of a "well played" patina before I'll throw on a thin coat of shallac. The back of the neck still has the satin poly, which is quite nice.
Pickups are a set of Kinman AVn-62 Noiseless with his "solderless" wiring. I totally cheated there (after rewiring the thing 5-6 times in different configurations, I was kind of done for a while). It does some cool stuff like let me choose .015 or .022 tone caps with a dip switch, and turns the bridge+middle pickups into a high-output "humbucker" with a push-pull tone knob.
The only remaining Fender piece of the bridge is the plate -- all other bits have been replaced with Callaham stainless steel. The stamped saddles (vs the original machined "Floyd Rose" style) are what finally made it sound like a proper Strat.

I realized I finally wanted a Strat after watching Jesse Gress play with Tony Levin (I spent ~10 years trying to learn Stick before giving up). The sounds he was getting and expression he had - wow. (sample video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WcbSjC9tAY8 - sadly the camera focuses on Tony almost exclusively) He also impressed me by changing a broken string mid-song in the time it took Tony to finish a bass solo!

Unfortunately, I hadn't done my homework and had no idea about the different types of Strats, so just went with what was "best" at the Fender shop. If I had to do it over again, I'd start with a standard MIM. Turns out the AmDeluxe hardware isn't compatible with any of the "regular" Strat hardware, including pickups (narrower string spacing). Thankfully, Kinman makes different spacings available. One thing that drew me to the AmD was it had the same locking tuners Jesse had that allowed the quick string change. At the time, these were pretty new and novel.

2007 Les Paul Standard Tobacco Burst:

After Les Paul died, I figured it was about time I got one. razz Which is odd, since Jimmy Page is who got me wanting to actually get good at guitar. I guess it was just too obvious, hence avoided.
Rewired it with "50's style" wiring, new pots, and Orange Drop caps (.015 neck, .022 bidge), Duncan SH-2n neck pickup with the chrome cover, Duncan SH-4 bridge (yes, it is styled after a guitar played by Mr. Page). Those pickups are much lower power than the stock BurstBuckers, so have lots more chime. It also has Callaham bridge & tailpiece (http://www.callahamguitars.com). Yes, the bridge did make a difference.

Warmoth "PRS" copy

This was my first "gonna build a guitar from scratch" project, done late 2012 (yeah, late to the party, at least guitar-wise. Had a bass custom built in the 90's).
Walnut body, flame maple archtop, with a Paduk neck and Pao Ferro fingerboard. I specced it with a 1 3/4” nut, 16” radius, and stainless super jumbo frets to give it the feel almost like an acoustic. It really helps with odd fingerings, and is great for crazy bends. Even with a bolt-on neck, it sustains for days.
It's got a pair of Duncan Distortion pickups (SH-6n/b) and parallel/single/serial switches, so it can go from all out screaming to plinky chime. I love the sound of a humbucker in parallel mode (which is right in between).
Finish is about 20 coats of shallac done as a "french polish". OMFG that was a lot of work, but sure is purty. Finish plan was for this, with drawing done by my wife of a fern growning from the jack plate, with some amber/yellow shellac on top of that, but she's been too busy to finish the drawing, so this is it. Heh, someday.

Warmoth Frankie Strat (mid 2015)

I guess having a kid in my late 40s made me miss my shredding days of yore. Haha.
This is a pretty solid copy of Eddies Frankenstein, minus the paint job. (The missus likes it this way, so put a stop to the stripes).
Alpine White Alder body, with a quarter sawn maple neck (clear satin nitro, Wolfgang profile, SS jumbo frets)
Bridge is an Original Floyd Rose, with 1980 (wife's birthday) quarter drilled and mounted as a bridge stop.
Just a Duncan SH-4 “Custom custom” pickup and a single volume “Tone" 500k knob for electronics. Not having a tone knob at all really does let a ton of highs through. Funny, but it's even a good guitar for playing straight clean stuff on.

Warmoth Jazzcaster (mid 2016)

Seafoam Mist Chambered Alder Jazzmaster body, with a roasted maple Jazzmaster neck (yes, it smelled like maple syrup for a month), Pao Ferro fingerboard @ 9.5" radius, SS "vintage" frets, and coral dots to keep with the Surf theme.
Duncan Vintage Jazzmaster Neck PU, and a Duncan Broadcaster Bridge PU, and 500k pots. It has a Callaham Vintage T Model Tele Bridge (with the ground down ashtray plate) and a Les Paul style jack plate instead of the regular Tele "cup".
The unfinished neck is a dream to play - none of the stickiness you get with a smooth poly finish.

It's funny, but getting deeper into modular synths opened me up to a few genres of music that I missed the first time around, Shoegaze being one of them. This, of course, made me look at Jazzmasters (my first good guitar was a 1964 Fender Mustang - wish i'd kept it). Having had the Mustang, and missing a nice 70's Tele I had traded to a friend, I knew I wanted a hybrid (don't like the Tele body/neck shape, nor the Jazzmaster trem).
This thing is amazing to play. Spank and twang for ages, and is glorious through a raging fuzz.

Sinamsis wrote:
So this touches on something I have yet to come to a conclusion on.... Is it better to find a cheap, second hand guitar with good "bones" and then bastardize the hell out of it with modifications?

There's a whole ton of people who are doing the "tricked out Squire" thing, so obviously it works for some.
My current crop shows my bias -- either a decent guitar with just the changes you need, or if you know what you want, go full custom. I'm never buying an off the shelf guitar again.
bandwidth
I'm a Warmoth fan and have built several instruments using their wonderful handiwork. These basses all have the stainless steel neck stiffening rods in them. I have never had a problem with neck dive out of them.

Jazzes:


Precisions:
Sinamsis
Sleipnir wrote:
Sinamsis wrote:
I'm wondering if there are other equally ill people here like me.

I think you are far from the only one with that sickness. :-)
I've been playing guitar since I was 6 (getting on *cough*45 years*cough*), and hacking at them since I was 14. Making a guitar more 'a part of you' by customizing it is a beautiful thing.

Lots have come and gone over the years, but these are still around (not counting ones with only minor hardware changes) in basically chronological order:

My Strat. I built this to be my Desert Island guitar - it can do pretty much anything decently, and some things incredible.

Started as a ~2001 American Deluxe with a clear Ash body and about 1/16" thick poly coating on the fingerboard.
It's gone through a few different bodies, currenly Swamp Ash with a satin Walnut stain.
After years of hating the fingerboard, I scraped the thick glossy poly off the front of the neck with a razor blade; now it feels amazing. I'm letting it get a bit of a "well played" patina before I'll throw on a thin coat of shallac. The back of the neck still has the satin poly, which is quite nice.
Pickups are a set of Kinman AVn-62 Noiseless with his "solderless" wiring. I totally cheated there (after rewiring the thing 5-6 times in different configurations, I was kind of done for a while). It does some cool stuff like let me choose .015 or .022 tone caps with a dip switch, and turns the bridge+middle pickups into a high-output "humbucker" with a push-pull tone knob.
The only remaining Fender piece of the bridge is the plate -- all other bits have been replaced with Callaham stainless steel. The stamped saddles (vs the original machined "Floyd Rose" style) are what finally made it sound like a proper Strat.

I realized I finally wanted a Strat after watching Jesse Gress play with Tony Levin (I spent ~10 years trying to learn Stick before giving up). The sounds he was getting and expression he had - wow. (sample video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WcbSjC9tAY8 - sadly the camera focuses on Tony almost exclusively) He also impressed me by changing a broken string mid-song in the time it took Tony to finish a bass solo!

Unfortunately, I hadn't done my homework and had no idea about the different types of Strats, so just went with what was "best" at the Fender shop. If I had to do it over again, I'd start with a standard MIM. Turns out the AmDeluxe hardware isn't compatible with any of the "regular" Strat hardware, including pickups (narrower string spacing). Thankfully, Kinman makes different spacings available. One thing that drew me to the AmD was it had the same locking tuners Jesse had that allowed the quick string change. At the time, these were pretty new and novel.

2007 Les Paul Standard Tobacco Burst:

After Les Paul died, I figured it was about time I got one. razz Which is odd, since Jimmy Page is who got me wanting to actually get good at guitar. I guess it was just too obvious, hence avoided.
Rewired it with "50's style" wiring, new pots, and Orange Drop caps (.015 neck, .022 bidge), Duncan SH-2n neck pickup with the chrome cover, Duncan SH-4 bridge (yes, it is styled after a guitar played by Mr. Page). Those pickups are much lower power than the stock BurstBuckers, so have lots more chime. It also has Callaham bridge & tailpiece (http://www.callahamguitars.com). Yes, the bridge did make a difference.

Warmoth "PRS" copy

This was my first "gonna build a guitar from scratch" project, done late 2012 (yeah, late to the party, at least guitar-wise. Had a bass custom built in the 90's).
Walnut body, flame maple archtop, with a Paduk neck and Pao Ferro fingerboard. I specced it with a 1 3/4” nut, 16” radius, and stainless super jumbo frets to give it the feel almost like an acoustic. It really helps with odd fingerings, and is great for crazy bends. Even with a bolt-on neck, it sustains for days.
It's got a pair of Duncan Distortion pickups (SH-6n/b) and parallel/single/serial switches, so it can go from all out screaming to plinky chime. I love the sound of a humbucker in parallel mode (which is right in between).
Finish is about 20 coats of shallac done as a "french polish". OMFG that was a lot of work, but sure is purty. Finish plan was for this, with drawing done by my wife of a fern growning from the jack plate, with some amber/yellow shellac on top of that, but she's been too busy to finish the drawing, so this is it. Heh, someday.

Warmoth Frankie Strat (mid 2015)

I guess having a kid in my late 40s made me miss my shredding days of yore. Haha.
This is a pretty solid copy of Eddies Frankenstein, minus the paint job. (The missus likes it this way, so put a stop to the stripes).
Alpine White Alder body, with a quarter sawn maple neck (clear satin nitro, Wolfgang profile, SS jumbo frets)
Bridge is an Original Floyd Rose, with 1980 (wife's birthday) quarter drilled and mounted as a bridge stop.
Just a Duncan SH-4 “Custom custom” pickup and a single volume “Tone" 500k knob for electronics. Not having a tone knob at all really does let a ton of highs through. Funny, but it's even a good guitar for playing straight clean stuff on.

Warmoth Jazzcaster (mid 2016)

Seafoam Mist Chambered Alder Jazzmaster body, with a roasted maple Jazzmaster neck (yes, it smelled like maple syrup for a month), Pao Ferro fingerboard @ 9.5" radius, SS "vintage" frets, and coral dots to keep with the Surf theme.
Duncan Vintage Jazzmaster Neck PU, and a Duncan Broadcaster Bridge PU, and 500k pots. It has a Callaham Vintage T Model Tele Bridge (with the ground down ashtray plate) and a Les Paul style jack plate instead of the regular Tele "cup".
The unfinished neck is a dream to play - none of the stickiness you get with a smooth poly finish.

It's funny, but getting deeper into modular synths opened me up to a few genres of music that I missed the first time around, Shoegaze being one of them. This, of course, made me look at Jazzmasters (my first good guitar was a 1964 Fender Mustang - wish i'd kept it). Having had the Mustang, and missing a nice 70's Tele I had traded to a friend, I knew I wanted a hybrid (don't like the Tele body/neck shape, nor the Jazzmaster trem).
This thing is amazing to play. Spank and twang for ages, and is glorious through a raging fuzz.

Sinamsis wrote:
So this touches on something I have yet to come to a conclusion on.... Is it better to find a cheap, second hand guitar with good "bones" and then bastardize the hell out of it with modifications?

There's a whole ton of people who are doing the "tricked out Squire" thing, so obviously it works for some.
My current crop shows my bias -- either a decent guitar with just the changes you need, or if you know what you want, go full custom. I'm never buying an off the shelf guitar again.



Those looks fantastic. I'm still on the fence between building up a guitar from scratch VS modding a built guitar. Certain guitars I just won't do that to. My Rick 360 is one example. I'm not loving the way it sits in with my other stuff, but I dare not change a thing. I'm letting it go. My Gretsch I'm really debating. My gut feeling is I'll end up keeping it and swapping out the pickups and electronics. The Starcaster (made in China) reissue I snagged I think I will end up loving. So far I've replaced the bridge with a Tone Pro rolling bridge, and I've installed a Bigsby and locking tuners. I'm certain I will replace the tuners with Fralin wide range humbuckers and probably have him swap out the electronics as well.

I'm definitely going to build a Warmoth Tele Deluxe next. In the end, I do believe that building my own guitar from the ground up is the most over all rewarding. I learn something going through the process. It also seems to end up being pretty damn expensive. Haha, I spent WELL over $1000 on the JM parts, probably closer to $1500. The Mastery bridge was not cheap, neither were the Bare Knuckles. And custom ordering the body and neck from Warmoth is a little pricier. For the Tele I think I can find a prebuilt neck, but again, the body will be a custom color (I'm thinking gold).
Sinamsis
bandwidth
Those basses look fantastic! Especially the fretless J bass. I'm thinking of snagging a new bass, and swapping out the neck on my MIM J bass for a Warmoth fretless.
bandwidth
Sinamsis
Thank you, they are wonderful basses and I do really like the fretless, it's a joy to play. As much as I like that neck, the best fretless neck I've had from Warmoth was a two octave, ebony fingerboard job I bought 15 years ago. Talk about SMOOTH. Unfortunately, I let that bass go back when I was churning through basses right and left.
Sinamsis
bandwidth
Can you say anything about pickups you chose? I really know very little about the technical aspect of bass, I'm originally a guitar player. I've owned an Ibanez 5 string in the past with active pickups. My J bass has the stock passive pickups. I'm leaning towards and American Elite P bass and leaving it as is. It seems to have everything I want, including active electronics that can be bypassed.
Sleipnir
Sinamsis wrote:
Those looks fantastic. I'm still on the fence between building up a guitar from scratch VS modding a built guitar. Certain guitars I just won't do that to. My Rick 360 is one example. I'm not loving the way it sits in with my other stuff, but I dare not change a thing. I'm letting it go. My Gretsch I'm really debating. My gut feeling is I'll end up keeping it and swapping out the pickups and electronics. The Starcaster (made in China) reissue I snagged I think I will end up loving. So far I've replaced the bridge with a Tone Pro rolling bridge, and I've installed a Bigsby and locking tuners. I'm certain I will replace the tuners with Fralin wide range humbuckers and probably have him swap out the electronics as well.

I'm definitely going to build a Warmoth Tele Deluxe next. In the end, I do believe that building my own guitar from the ground up is the most over all rewarding. I learn something going through the process. It also seems to end up being pretty damn expensive. Haha, I spent WELL over $1000 on the JM parts, probably closer to $1500. The Mastery bridge was not cheap, neither were the Bare Knuckles. And custom ordering the body and neck from Warmoth is a little pricier. For the Tele I think I can find a prebuilt neck, but again, the body will be a custom color (I'm thinking gold).


It's not as expensive as the playability/quality/features would make you think. The prices for the three Warmoth's were right about $1300, 1300, and 1200 (that's with the last two being prefinished bodies). That's counting every screw and jackplate, and not a single off the shelf body/neck among them. Doesn't count tools, wire, shielding, or elbow grease.
Contrast that with, say, an AmDeluxe Strat with, um, $1000 worth of doodads. Dead Banana
Your first built guitar will have issues. That's just a given, due to inexperience. They'll probably be fixable. One hot tip: use beeswax on all your wood screws.
The PRS copy has a broken pickup ring mounting screw that I'll need to drill out someday. Guinness ftw!

In all my days, there's only been one guitar I've been happiest with as bone stock:

That's because some guy named Chet already did the spec work. Hah.
A surprise present for my 50th from my honey.
I swapped out a tune-o-matic type bridge, but it bound up with the Bigsby, and the intonation is surprisingly good up to the 17th fret or so, so back to stock.
Sinamsis
That's a beauty. What year is it? Is it US made? I really wanted to get a Country Gentleman but they seem really pricey for a guitar that's not built in the US. Only the custom shops are made in the US, and I just don't feel right shelling out that kind of cash for a guitar. So I think I'll just bring my 5422 closer to spec. It's actually got a pretty decent feel to it. I just feel like the Filtertrons are a little muddy. Maybe just replacing the electronics would help, but I have my eye on some TV Jones Classics.
Sleipnir
Sinamsis wrote:
That's a beauty. What year is it? Is it US made? I really wanted to get a Country Gentleman but they seem really pricey for a guitar that's not built in the US.

No, it's made in Japan. It's a 2015 limited edition (the figuring on the curly maple body is amazing in person). It's got TVJones in as stock.
It would be a $10,000 guitar if made in the US, and it couldn't possibly look/play/feel any better. It has better built internal bracing than my ~2003 ES-175 (like, the Gibson has warped wood with drippy glue, not so on the Gretsch).
The Gretsch rep sent me the 2016 catalog... because this guitar is on the cover. cool

Back to the original subject, a friend got an Epi 335 and had the pots/switch/jack & pickups swapped out. It's like a new guitar, and certainly better "value" than a Gibby (which is a dangerous word when talking about stuff like this).
Sinamsis
Sleipnir wrote:
Sinamsis wrote:
That's a beauty. What year is it? Is it US made? I really wanted to get a Country Gentleman but they seem really pricey for a guitar that's not built in the US.

No, it's made in Japan. It's a 2015 limited edition (the figuring on the curly maple body is amazing in person). It's got TVJones in as stock.
It would be a $10,000 guitar if made in the US, and it couldn't possibly look/play/feel any better. It has better built internal bracing than my ~2003 ES-175 (like, the Gibson has warped wood with drippy glue, not so on the Gretsch).
The Gretsch rep sent me the 2016 catalog... because this guitar is on the cover. cool

Back to the original subject, a friend got an Epi 335 and had the pots/switch/jack & pickups swapped out. It's like a new guitar, and certainly better "value" than a Gibby (which is a dangerous word when talking about stuff like this).



It's beautiful man!

Yeah, the more I think about it, the more I think I will keep the Electromatic and upgrade the electronics and pickups.
bandwidth
Sinamsis
The pickups in all those basses are Seymour Duncan. I like to use a Vintage wound pickup at the neck and a Hot wound pickup at the bridge. It gives a nice solid, clear bass response and you can get some grit by dialing in the bridge pu.

There are some nice guitars in this thread. Good job, everybody! thumbs up
sduck
bandwidth wrote:

There are some nice guitars in this thread. Good job, everybody! thumbs up


Yes! I got inspired and started digging around on warmoth's site last night - I really want something like Sleipnir's PRS style guitar. Couldn't find anything in the showcase, so started in the body builder - by the time i was done it was 900$! I guess it'll have to wait...
Sinamsis
sduck wrote:
bandwidth wrote:

There are some nice guitars in this thread. Good job, everybody! thumbs up


Yes! I got inspired and started digging around on warmoth's site last night - I really want something like Sleipnir's PRS style guitar. Couldn't find anything in the showcase, so started in the body builder - by the time i was done it was 900$! I guess it'll have to wait...


Ha I'm glad I'm not the only one with this experience. The "add ons" add up quickly. That price was for body alone?! Ha holy cow! Probably not a bad idea to just watch the stock stuff and see if anything pops up that you want. Haha. Still, cheaper than a custom shop guitar any day! And the build quality stands up to any other American made guitar from what I've seen, though I haven't really ever owned or played any really "nice" or expensive guitars. Either way, good enough for me.
Sleipnir
sduck wrote:
bandwidth wrote:

There are some nice guitars in this thread. Good job, everybody! thumbs up


Yes! I got inspired and started digging around on warmoth's site last night - I really want something like Sleipnir's PRS style guitar. Couldn't find anything in the showcase, so started in the body builder - by the time i was done it was 900$! I guess it'll have to wait...

Thanks oops
Yeah, the finishing can easily double the price (and so it should be, because it's FREAKING HARD). I easily spent a month on that french polish, about an hour a day sanding or rubbing in the shellac.
That body was $570 (in 2012), but that wasn't their "unique choice wood" or anything. Just went on the Warmoth site to make the same thing and it was only $480 (though there's no longer a choice of "no binding" - wtf).
Getting unfinished also meant I could hack at it. Not shown in the pics is I rounded the heel and countersunk the screws, so no neck plate. It's the closest I could get to a neck-through. thumbs up
Sinamsis
bandwidth wrote:
Sinamsis
The pickups in all those basses are Seymour Duncan. I like to use a Vintage wound pickup at the neck and a Hot wound pickup at the bridge. It gives a nice solid, clear bass response and you can get some grit by dialing in the bridge pu.

There are some nice guitars in this thread. Good job, everybody! thumbs up


Nice, that makes sense. I'll look into those. I think I will eventually want to switch out the PUPs on my J bass.
sduck
Sleipnir wrote:
Just went on the Warmoth site to make the same thing and it was only $480 (though there's no longer a choice of "no binding" - wtf).


Yes, I kind of gave up when I couldn't find a no binding or masked binding option - they used to have that, don't know where it went. It's a freaking PRS copy - they put masked binding on the map!
Sinamsis
sduck wrote:
Sleipnir wrote:
Just went on the Warmoth site to make the same thing and it was only $480 (though there's no longer a choice of "no binding" - wtf).


Yes, I kind of gave up when I couldn't find a no binding or masked binding option - they used to have that, don't know where it went. It's a freaking PRS copy - they put masked binding on the map!


You should contact them. I noticed that with the Mooncaster bodies too, but then when I looked in the gallery of prepared bodies, it looked like there were bodies with hidden binding.
bandwidth
I'm with you guys as far as being a Warmoth junkie. I've spent hours with their "build your custom" website - it's like going onto Modulargrid and endlessly arranging and rearranging a synthesizer. All the basses I posted above are "In Stock" bodies and necks. However, this guy is the bass that made me a Warmoth junkie.



I built it in the late 90's so I don't have a clue what it cost me, but it was a great bass. The neck ended up living on several different basses and imparting its voodoo to each. It had this bell-like clarity to it that was unreal. What I've found buying "In Stock" parts is that I can build the equivalent of a Fender Deluxe instrument for Fender Standard prices. applause
commodorejohn
Okay, that...that Warmoth site is a dangerous discovery for me...

SO MANY OPTIONS!!!

What they really need is an extensive set of A/B comparisons between the different tonewoods in chambered and solid bodies, neck/fretboard wood combinations, etc.
Sinamsis
commodorejohn wrote:
Okay, that...that Warmoth site is a dangerous discovery for me...

SO MANY OPTIONS!!!

What they really need is an extensive set of A/B comparisons between the different tonewoods in chambered and solid bodies, neck/fretboard wood combinations, etc.



Clicking the questions mark links next to the options has been very educational for me. Haha.

And that's a beauty bandwidth.
Sinamsis
I dropped off my Starcaster at Lindy Fralin's today to get the pickups installed and have the electronics replaced. A Fralin Tele Deluxe caught my eye (actually Lindy's guitar) and I asked about it. It had the wide range humbuckers in it. The guy in the shop let me give it a whirl. It sounded AMAZING. So rich and deep, coming for a tele haha. I can't wait to hear how it sounds in the Starcaster. I spoke to Lindy before bringing it in, and he described his approach to the FWRH. His pickups use pole pieces like the originals, but I think they're alnico and not CuNiFe. I think he said the coils are split (I had asked him if we could maybe coil tap them) but some of the stuff was over my head haha. But it sounded fantastics. I only played it clean. I'm interested to hear it through some dirt pedals and effects. More to follow!
Sleipnir
Damnit, all the awesome basses are making me drool over building a JazzPrec hybrid.
Curses! help
bandwidth
@Sleipnir, I say go for it, PJs are the way to play. A single P pickup always sounds a little empty to me. Put a J back by the bridge, and bam! There's some life in the thing. I have plenty of bass hero's that play a basic P, I just can't make myself happy with that configuration!

@Sinamsis, that is cool that you can drop your instrument off at Lindy Fralin's to be worked on. NICE!
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