MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index
 FAQ & Terms of UseFAQ & Terms Of Use   Wiggler RadioMW Radio   Muff Wiggler TwitterTwitter   Support the site @ PatreonPatreon 
 SearchSearch   RegisterSign up   Log inLog in 
WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

For the Bass experts here
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Guitars, Basses, Amps & FX  
Author For the Bass experts here
Numanoid92
I've watched multiple times in the last 12 years the 2005 Concert in Milan of Depeche Mode and, incredibly, just now i realize that Martin Gore is playing his Danelectro Bass, i always thought it was a guitar.. Any of you expert knows who can someone make a bass sound like this?

Sburkart
Don't recognize that as a Danno bass (trapezoid inlays?) I've read that they use Pro Tools to trigger changes in the guitar rig live; they are also big on Moogerfooger pedals, etc. and of course synths.

To cover that song with what I have available I'd go with using a pick on flatwound strings using a Sonuus B2M audio to midi converter to trigger a distorted synth patch for just the lowest notes desired in that bass line.
GuyaGuy
That's an Epiphone Jack Casady Signature
cracked_machine
That's the synthesizer you're hearing, not the bass. If you watch closely he's not playing that bass guitar for most of the song. There are short sections where he plucks some of the higher strings with a pick (0:20 - 0:35) and sections where he is not playing at all (0:35 - 1:05). That's just clean-ish bass.

So no effects are being used on the bass for this song (at least nothing to make it resemble a synth). That's not to say they don't use synth effects on the bass for other songs. ;-)

Sometimes trying to emulate a synth sound on bass guitar is like trying to find a vegan replacement for meat. It's never gonna sound the same so you shouldn't bother trying very frustrating
That being said you can get some amazing sounds with "synth" effects pedals. The trick is really in managing your expectations I guess. Its a constant topic of discussion over on talkbass or basschat.

But to paraphrase your question "How would you emulate synth on a bass". The main three approaches are either using

1) a single "all-in-one" synth pedal
2) many smaller stompbox-type pedals in a modular configuration or
3) a special pickup on the guitar that translates the signal into midi signals and a laptop to process the signals.

Personally I'm a follower of method 2. Simply because you end up with something more unique sounding with the added simplicity of being able to physically interact directly with the effects when you play live.

Phew, sorry for the long answer. Rockin' Banana!
Numanoid92
Thanks for the answers. I was shocked by the bass sound, it sounded almost like a guitar sometimes
Delta T
I have a V-bass connected to my Spector 6Ex-Lx bass and you can get pretty synthi sounds with it. What's nice is the polyphonic octave effect you can use - unfortunately the filter sounds in the V-bass are not as good as what you could get in a modular setup, but they're not bad. I don't know how they are in the VB-99.
Shrigg
cracked_machine wrote:
Sometimes trying to emulate a synth sound on bass guitar is like trying to find a vegan replacement for meat. It's never gonna sound the same so you shouldn't bother trying very frustrating
That being said you can get some amazing sounds with "synth" effects pedals. The trick is really in managing your expectations I guess. Its a constant topic of discussion over on talkbass or basschat.

But to paraphrase your question "How would you emulate synth on a bass". The main three approaches are either using

1) a single "all-in-one" synth pedal
2) many smaller stompbox-type pedals in a modular configuration or
3) a special pickup on the guitar that translates the signal into midi signals and a laptop to process the signals.

Personally I'm a follower of method 2. Simply because you end up with something more unique sounding with the added simplicity of being able to physically interact directly with the effects when you play live.

Phew, sorry for the long answer. Rockin' Banana!


Agree 100%. Some of the best synthy tones I've gotten out of electric bass are with over the top fuzz pedals like the Mooer FOG https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pjd6WwZrCfM combined with an envelope follower pedal (I use the https://mrblackpedals.com/products/fwonkbeta)
calaveras
Wow, you guys are on some serious crak rok.

That is a pretty simple sound that a lot of the boutique pedals would have no problems getting close to. Some of the Death By Audio pedals like Interstellar Overdriver do a good job. But my personal pick would be the Malekko B:Assmaster.
Alternatey the older DOD synth bass pedal, the all analogue one, with a Muff fuzz on it would be similar, but maybe too sweepy.

As far as sounding synthy with a bass in general. Just approach it like a subtractive synth. First you want to make it sound like a couple PWM oscs, so use a flanger or some other modulation pedal to fatten up the 'voice'. Also use a conservative pickup and preamp setting so the strings aren't too evident.
Then use a filter pedal like a Moogerfooger, EHX Doctor Q etc.
Instant synth bass.
I've tried using pitch pedals, but for me I do not like the effect when octaving up most of the time. Octave down pedals seem good though.

Another thing that works super well is to use a phase, chorus and flange at the same time, all on mild settings. This keeps it from sounding too much like a regular sweepy phaser/chorus type thing, but still gives you a detuned kind of sound.
gweilo
Numanoid92 wrote:
Thanks for the answers. I was shocked by the bass sound, it sounded almost like a guitar sometimes


To me, the key factors in the sound are the use of a pick, the bright roundwound strings, and the notes sustaining over each other. Bass players tend to mute all but one of the strings at a time. Letting multiple notes ring is a lot more common on guitar.
MindMachine
^ I mean was he even playing at 2:06 when those same tones were coming out? His right hand was resting behind the guitar as far as I could tell.

He was likely mixed so far back it didn't matter.


calaveras wrote:
Wow, you guys are on some serious crak rok.

That is a pretty simple sound that a lot of the boutique pedals would have no problems getting close to. Some of the Death By Audio pedals like Interstellar Overdriver do a good job. But my personal pick would be the Malekko B:Assmaster.
Alternatey the older DOD synth bass pedal, the all analogue one, with a Muff fuzz on it would be similar, but maybe too sweepy.

As far as sounding synthy with a bass in general. Just approach it like a subtractive synth. First you want to make it sound like a couple PWM oscs, so use a flanger or some other modulation pedal to fatten up the 'voice'. Also use a conservative pickup and preamp setting so the strings aren't too evident.
Then use a filter pedal like a Moogerfooger, EHX Doctor Q etc.
Instant synth bass.
I've tried using pitch pedals, but for me I do not like the effect when octaving up most of the time. Octave down pedals seem good though.

Another thing that works super well is to use a phase, chorus and flange at the same time, all on mild settings. This keeps it from sounding too much like a regular sweepy phaser/chorus type thing, but still gives you a detuned kind of sound.


Really? Your fingers feel pretty warm too.
bloke_zero
For synth bass sounds I too like the Malekko B:Assmaster, but I'm more familiar with the original - Maestro Brass Master - admittedly the Malekko has a better name! Recently I've had some joy running that into a Mutron clone - the Brassmaster keeps the dynamics of the playing much better than just a distortion pedal which is vital for the Mutron otherwise you don't get the expression. Running that through a compressor helps bring out the midrange filter/synth sounds, in my case an akai hexacomp - helps accentuate the frequencies you want.

I love the combination as you can really 'play' the filter by hitting the strings louder or quieter - weirdly I've enjoyed the sound of the envelop going down more than going up - feels like it's got more liquid funk! The mutron is really hard to dial in though - there are only a few knobs but it takes a while to get it right and changing anything else in the chain up to that point can make it sound different.

That said I don't think the bass is making those synth sounds - like the others have said I think that is sequenced synth.
splonge
I have been wondering down the "make a bass sound like a synth" road for a long time. Tried bespoke pedals, all in one units, software, building my own etc. Its tricky to get the balance between "sounds good" and "is playable" right.

For a while, I was happiest with a patch I built on a Nord Micro Nodular with an OC3 going into it.

I have that recorded here:

[bandcamp width=100% height=120 album=1997457887 size=large bgcol=ffffff linkcol=0687f5 tracklist=false artwork=small track=387772980]

Just over a year ago I discovered the Zoom MS-60B and the AMAZING Z-Syn effect. I go from there into a Source Audio Bass Filter Pro for the foot pedal expression. I can record some if anyone in interested.
Rex Coil 7
For about ten years I was in a live performance band that did all of our own music ... heavily influenced by The Smiths, Morrissey, Depeche Mode, Siouxsie and the Banshees, Cocteau Twins .... you get the drift. I played bass and keys, and wrote roughly 75% of the music.

Getting to Steven Severin's bass sound was easy enough, Jazz bass with chorus with the main essence coming from picking UPSTROKE which creates a vastly different tone (it has a profound affect on the sound of the attack of each note).

After that, most bass and/or guitar sounds for that type of music were covered with the use of the GIANT SIZED Electro Harmonix Poly Chorus, neck pickup, and loads of delay/reverb.

The Smiths was easy enough ..... P Bass, pick only, Ampeg SVT amp with the HRF610 cabinet. Clean and dry.

Synth and synth bass sounds were done using a "midified" set of Hammond bass pedals patched up to various synth engines. If I recall, I used any variations of EMU samplers, my Kurzweil K2600RS 76 key, and a Nord Lead III.

For doing live work (which was our primary effort) getting "close enough" worked out great, as long as we wore enough eyeliner, women's blouses, and heavy use of hairspray.

Sometimes, just to mess with the crowds' heads, I'd have a bass sequence doing backing track while I ~faked~ playing my bass guitar. After nearly every show, I'd have people approaching me asking how I got such a wonderful bass sound out of my bass rig. Normally, I'd just pass out some techy sounding mumbo that included "special bespoke cables" and "heavily modified Ampeg amp" with a "custom chorus". Heheh .... worked every time.

Other than a few essential tricks (upstroke picking for certain songs on the bass, etc...) it's more about giving the people what they wanted .... which was to be transported back to 1987 when they wore black trenchcoats, a mohawk, and eyeliner to high school.

We played in Vegas, Los Angeles, Phoenix, Mexico (extremely well rec'd in Mexico btw), El Centro, and a number of other cities that escape me presently. It was very fun, and of course at times it was very suckage (like when one guitar player we had up and quit in the middle of a six night long gig booked in Vegas ... I had to come up with a LOT of tricks and fills using my synths to make up for the lack of a guitarist ... good thing our lead singer played the melodies on his own guitar).

It's all about creating the image ... people's minds tend to fill-in the rest when it comes to having authentic sound. Good musicianship is a must as well. Folks just want to be entertained, y'know?

seriously, i just don't get it
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Guitars, Basses, Amps & FX  
Page 1 of 1
Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group