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Daisy Chaining power strips question
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> General Gear  
Author Daisy Chaining power strips question
3pand
Apologies if this has been asked before, the search function isn't working at the moment.

I'm trying to keep my cable situation as neat as possible, and I just got a new shelf that includes some rack space. Also included in one of those rack spaces is a 1u power strip.

I already have a rackmount power conditioner with a bunch of outlets, but I will also need a few of the outlets from the rackmount power strip.

I'm just wondering, is it ok to plug the power conditioner, which itself will have 7 or so things plugged into it, into the power strip (which will also have an additional 3 or so things plugged into it)?

My only reason for doing this is so that I can have just the one final power cable from the rackmount power strip going out from the shelf to the wall.

I don't know for sure, but I definitely wouldn't be surprised if the electricity situation in the place I live is not as good as it could be in terms of handling a bigger load or whatever. No idea if that would extend to plugging things into a single wall outlet as opposed to two.

Also, is there any way to know if the rackmount power strip offers surge protection? It doesn't have anything written on it but it does have one extra button that serves no apparent functon.
akairipper
3pand wrote:
Apologies if this has been asked before, the search function isn't working at the moment.

I'm trying to keep my cable situation as neat as possible, and I just got a new shelf that includes some rack space. Also included in one of those rack spaces is a 1u power strip.

I already have a rackmount power conditioner with a bunch of outlets, but I will also need a few of the outlets from the rackmount power strip.

I'm just wondering, is it ok to plug the power conditioner, which itself will have 7 or so things plugged into it, into the power strip (which will also have an additional 3 or so things plugged into it)?

My only reason for doing this is so that I can have just the one final power cable from the rackmount power strip going out from the shelf to the wall.

I don't know for sure, but I definitely wouldn't be surprised if the electricity situation in the place I live is not as good as it could be in terms of handling a bigger load or whatever. No idea if that would extend to plugging things into a single wall outlet as opposed to two.

Also, is there any way to know if the rackmount power strip offers surge protection? It doesn't have anything written on it but it does have one extra button that serves no apparent functon.


Don't do it. Buy bigger powerstips plug each one into a separate socket and don't exceed the powersrips max load and dont exceed the sockets max load and dond exceed the ring main max load. The surge protector is not designed to have other powerstips plugged in to it.talk to an electrician if in doubt. Everybody plugs powerstips into powerstips but it don't mean it's safe or advisable or a guaranteed insurance payout when you start a fire.
oldgearguy
it all depends on what the strips are rated for and how much current is being pulled by your gear.

Years ago, I bought one of these meters to see the current draw for my gear. At the time it was more important because stuff like the Ampex MM1200 was drawing 8 amps in ff or rewind modes. eek!

In the US, the general rule used to be 80% of the rated capacity. So, if a circuit breaker in the wall was rated at 20 Amps, you should only be drawing 16 at most. **I don't know what the current regulations are. Look them up and/or consult an electrician**

The point is, if power strip 1 is rated for 15 amps, and power strip 2 is rated for 15 amps and if all the gear plugged into strip 1 is only drawing 5 amps, you should be able to plug strip 1 into strip 2 and use some additional plugs in strip 2.

AGAIN - don't guess. Determine what your gear draws, look up the rating for the strips in question, determine what circuit breaker the gear is on and figure out what else is on that same breaker, etc. Wires heating up in the wall because of a higher than rated current draw are a dangerous situation.

Oh - the extra button is to reset the thermal fuse on the power strip if it overheats and opens due to excessive current draw. Most people would advise tossing out the power strip after you cause that condition, but the button is there to reset the fuse.
stk
akairipper wrote:
Don't do it


Why not?
As far as I know it all depends on the load of your gear, and the capacity of your power strips. But perhaps I am misinformed (quite possible) and you have evidence to the contrary?
Muzone
stk wrote:
akairipper wrote:
Don't do it


Why not?
As far as I know it all depends on the load of your gear, and the capacity of your power strips....


Seems about right to me - amps is amps innit!
I reckon it's far better to check your domestic supply/wiring & the general condition of your plugs and connections than simply bother about a few stacked plugboards.
akairipper
stk wrote:
akairipper wrote:
Don't do it


Why not?
As far as I know it all depends on the load of your gear, and the capacity of your power strips. But perhaps I am misinformed (quite possible) and you have evidence to the contrary?


You want to advise someone who obviously doesn't know something as he 8s asking questions about it to do it? Overloaded sockets and wiring case fires.
stk
akairipper wrote:
stk wrote:
akairipper wrote:
Don't do it


Why not?
As far as I know it all depends on the load of your gear, and the capacity of your power strips. But perhaps I am misinformed (quite possible) and you have evidence to the contrary?


You want to advise someone who obviously doesn't know something as he 8s asking questions about it to do it? Overloaded sockets and wiring case fires.


I'd advise someone to calculate their total load, compare this to the rating of their power strips and make sure they leave a reasonable margin for error.

Also, purchase power strips with the appropriate local standards award (not some cheap crap dropshipped from China) and don't leave you gear on perpetually (because, apart from anything else, the Planet).

Cheers
PISS.EXE
Just because i have seen art students daisy chain a half dozen surge protectors out of one outlet doesn't mean you should. Whenever I saw it happen I didn't say anything and somehow never saw the power shit out because of someone doing it, but then again powering all your guitar pedals and one MacBook isn't THAT much to pull off the outlet.

I also shouldn't admit that i have run my whole home studio off one set of outlets for longer than i should ha ve (after making sure i won't blow a fuse by switching it on) while waiting for electricians to come repair a different set of outlets that suddenly died. But nothing died or blew up.
Ceres
I plug my power strips into each other like a figure 8, for free power.
NoLegs
Ceres wrote:
I plug my power strips into each other like a figure 8, for free power.


Electric Companies Hate This Man Because Of This One Weird Trick!
3pand
NoLegs wrote:
Ceres wrote:
I plug my power strips into each other like a figure 8, for free power.


Electric Companies Hate This Man Because Of This One Weird Trick!


Hahaha.

Thanks for all the info and replies. Figuring out the current draw seems to be the way to go. If it's past 10 amps or so then I'll probably also figure out how much of the capacity I'm taxing.
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