MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index
 FAQ & Terms of UseFAQ & Terms Of Use   Wiggler RadioMW Radio   Muff Wiggler TwitterTwitter   Support the site @ PatreonPatreon 
 SearchSearch   RegisterSign up   Log inLog in 
WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

Buchla 100 system diy build
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Music Tech DIY Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10  Next [all]
Author Buchla 100 system diy build
pre55ure
Peake wrote:

-Pre55ure pointed out that the 470r to ground just after the sine shaper can be made a trimmer to zero in. Going off of memory and not the schematic.


Close, but it's actually the one right next to the 470r. It's the 3.3k between ground and the base of Q14 that I usually swap for a trimmer. thumbs up

I've also found that 2n5460 seems to be the jfet that I have the best luck with in the core. The sine wave is really sensitive to having the right combo of jfets in the circuit. I would recommend socketing the transistors so you can try out a few different ones and decide on one's that get you the closest.
yan6
I can't make out all of the modules from your etching pictures, but what modules make up a basic 100 series.
APETECHNOLOGY
yan6 wrote:
I can't make out all of the modules from your etching pictures, but what modules make up a basic 100 series.


hi yan6
i don't really know what a basic Buchla 100 system was.
just like today i am sure it was what ever your budget could support.
the modules i am presently making are..
2 x 144 dual square wave oscillators
2 x 158 dual sine saw
1 - 156 dual voltage processor
2 x 110 quad vca
1 x 106 mixer
1 x quad low pass filter based on the 192
in the future i would like to build a version of the 102 stereo panner
a random module
a envelope generator,or 2
and some sort of touch controller
i am really interested in the 113
this should keep me busy this winter!
hope this answered you question !
Cthulhu
APETECHNOLOGY
yan6,
i never answered your question...
here is a image of a Buchla 100 system.
this image does not include the 102 or the 113.



Peake
For later, I have an envelope generator layout available which can be used dual, quad, or hex on a single panel or two duals across a pair of adjacent panels from the single PCB. I also have front panel artwork for the 160 noise, 194 fixed filter bank, and 165 random to use with Fluxmonkey's commercially available PCBs. The 165 uses a pair of his 208 random PCBs and can be expanded to up to four individual, discrete outputs per side due to the nature of the 208 circuit, but two per side is standard to the original look (I'm supposing it was actually one voltage per side, wired together; you can of course do it that way as well).
yan6
APETECHNOLOGY wrote:
yan6,
i never answered your question...
here is a image of a Buchla 100 system.
this image does not include the 102 or the 113.


Thanks very much for the good info. Your project has inspired me a bit and has me researching a few ideas. Perhaps I missed it but were there any envelopes available. Also just curious where was the 192 low pass filter from
Peake
Quad and Hex AR envelope builds are here:

https://www.muffwiggler.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=168870

The 192 is very similar to the LPF on the 410 Module Cluster. The one I've made available is from the 410 schematics.
pre55ure
yan6 wrote:
APETECHNOLOGY wrote:
yan6,
i never answered your question...
here is a image of a Buchla 100 system.
this image does not include the 102 or the 113.


Thanks very much for the good info. Your project has inspired me a bit and has me researching a few ideas. Perhaps I missed it but were there any envelopes available. Also just curious where was the 192 low pass filter from


The 180 is the envelope generator. Just a little bit of weird Buchla nomenclature. hihi

The 192 is interesting, The early versions actually used little incandescent lamps and photosensors in a tube of shrink wrap. I believe that later versions replaced these with vactrols (possible the first use of vactrols in Buchla stuff?)
There is also the 191 filter, which is a LP/HP/BP 24db filter. I have one built up on protoboard but so far I have only been able to get it partially working.
Synesthesia
i would love to build the 2U 191.

did you find a schematics anywhere ? I only have a very basic one.
fluxmonkey
Just to let you know, I've recently restocked all my PCBs: 111 ring mod, 160 noise, 194 BPF, and the random gen based on 208. Info/purchase at http://fluxmonkey.com/fluxmerch_gear.htm

Also, kudos to Mike Peake for all his work on the 100 circuitry over the years, he's really carried the torch on this one.

Good luck!

b
Peake
I have panel artwork for Fluxmonkey's above-mentioned PCBs if anyone wants to build from them, they're easy to build. Thank you for them.
Peake
Synesthesia, I'd love to see a genuine 191 as well. All I've found is that hand-drawn partial schematic.
lasesentaysiete
Peake
yes, please!

BTW, this thread has me on a bit of a 100 series investigation, and I am wondering if anything ever came of your 123 experiments?
Peake
I have a double-sided 123 layout with PCB-mounted pots which doesn't work, have poked at it a bit with no luck, asked questions in a couple of forums with no luck. No, nothing yet.
Peake
I've uploaded the 160, 165, and 194 front panel artwork for use with Fluxmonkey PCBs in this post:

https://www.muffwiggler.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=2671917#2671917
APETECHNOLOGY
ok i am usually not this slow in building stuff!
i bought styrene caps off eBay that took forever....
heres the gang


APETECHNOLOGY
ok,
one by one
106
APETECHNOLOGY
quad 110

APETECHNOLOGY
quad opto filter
the lamps are the worst ! the leads are super bendy...
APETECHNOLOGY
156

APETECHNOLOGY
144

APETECHNOLOGY
158

APETECHNOLOGY
now its time to figure out how to make the panels.
i am going to try lazertran on brushed aluminum.
i asked Peake about how to go about getting a nice result?
his reply was...


Hi, first go to

http://clacktronics.co.uk/research/lazertran/

and study it.

There are several steps and using it is an art. Firstly, try using blank panels from the person in the UK who was recently selling them in the DIY forum; the metal they use is lighter than Bemi and other blanks and lazertran bakes to it far more successfully.

-I wash the panels with soapy water and rinse them very well before use.
-Dip the panel into the water where the lazertran is soaking and put it on the panel under water. It is easier to move into place when the panel is wet.
-When rubbing the bubbles out from between the panel and lazertran decal don't go too hard as the lazertran can stretch. Or break.
-Definitely make sure you've gotten out as many bubbles as is possible. Once the art is aligned on the panel, dry the back of the panel and then the decal. Make sure again to not stretch it or leave any fibres which will discolor when baking. Water on top of the decal will bake as a brown stain.
-I set the panels on the stovetop while it is coming to temperature so any excess water I've missed is evaporated.
-Place them upon tin foil. Metal oven bars will burn the back of the panel.
-Follow the clacktronics directions regarding increasing the temperature over a 2 1/2 hour period.
-Let them sit and cool in the oven a while before removing. The decal in its heated state easily collects fingerprints and smudges upon its gloss.
-Remove and let sit and cool where nothing will fall upon them such as cat hair which would stick.

I use one of these to do starter punches on the drill marks:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Brass-TEKTON-6580-Automatic-Center-Punch-Dril l-Screw-Starter-metal-wood-plastic/322306446019?epid=2254970696&hash=i tem4b0af612c3:g:UXYAAOxyRhBS6ZoS

They're very loud so do it in a well-lit, open area perhaps with headphones or earplugs.
Use quality drill bits only. Have a set of different sizes.
Use 1/16" on each starter hole. If any go off center from the desired point, use a larger bit to open them out then a small circular file to center the guide hole.
You can go from there directly to the correct size bit per hole or do another step in between.
When starting from 1/16" directly to large bit sizes, drill a little and pull back, check the result to make sure it's centered.
Slower drill speeds are best.
Metal filings will blind you so use glasses or safety goggles.
Metal filings will get everywhere so have a trash can handy. Sometimes I can only do one hole before having to tilt the panel over the trash and brush it lightly off.
Some bits will catch the bits being removed and will swirl them in circles upon the lazertran, making things ugly if it's outside the area which would be covered by nuts or knobs. It's possible to drill from the back of the panel if this becomes a worry but of course have a piece of paper or paper towel between the artwork side and the table.
There is something called chamfering where a much larger bit is lightly used to angle the very top edge of both sides of holes with metal sticking up, removes the flash/excess and smooths it. Don't do that to anything which won't be covered by a nut on the art side, meaning if you use any plastic-shaft pots which are not secured to the panel you'd have an ugly surround so use another means to tidy it up.
Alpha pots apparently have a metric shaft diameter so don't be surprised if you end up with a little wiggle room for pots.
Also have a round, tapered file such as this to tidy any slightly ugly holes are holes which are just a touch too small for the desired component:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/New-KING-10-Smooth-Cut-ROUND-FILE-Single-Cut- Steel-American-Grading/252760200405?hash=item3ad9ae94d5:g:7MsAAOSwLEtY mmVW

Do all touch-up work with things like that over or in a trash can in a place which can be cleaned. Tiny metal filings in your living area can end up in your eye.

Suffice to say there is an enormous amount of work involved and tools and etc. I didn't even mention getting the standoffs and PCB mounting started...I mount standoffs to the PCB, place the PCB behind the panel, and make marks around the standoffs, top first, then drill and make sure the top is right, then the bottom pair. For projects where you know the dimensions you can add them to the lazertran as dots for the starter punch, that is the easiest way.

amazing, thanks Peake!
sanders
APETECHNOLOGY wrote:
now its time to figure out how to make the panels.
i am going to try lazertran on brushed aluminum.
i asked Peake about how to go about getting a nice result?
his reply was...


I made a small system of DIY Buchla 200 modules almost 10 years ago using brushed aluminum Lazertran'd panels (see below and in my avatar pic; sorry I don't have better photos on hand). The results were quite good considering the cost being so low. But I found there are some serious downsides.

By far the best results came from the laser printer variety of Lazertran. I found the inkjet variety to be useless. It doesn't look nearly as good, it's not as thin or transparent a decal as I recall, and it's a mess to apply.

Unfortunately, the laser-printer variety only works on particular machines, none of which have been in manufacture for years. It wasn't hard to track down one of these older printers some years back; people basically give them away, but the driver software no longer works on any of my current computers. So my lazertran adventures are currently on hold. I'm sure someone with a bit more saavy than me could figure out how to get these printers running again.

However, it gets a little worse; In practice, found the durability of these decals is not incredibly high. After several months, and years, bits of decal start to wear away. Also, because it's a soft plastic film/coating over the aluminum, it collects quite a bit of dust and grime. You have to be extremely careful when cleaning the panels, or else they'll wear out even quicker.

For something you're putting so much time, effort, and care into making, lazertran is not a great solution, IMO.

If I were making these panels today, I would either order brushed aluminum blanks from Buchla or other suppliers (or brush them myself from blanks ordered from Front Panel Express, as I did before). Then send them to Front Panel Express for milling and printing.

When I made these 200 series panels years ago, FPE didn't offer laser printing as they do now, they only offered etching at that time. Moreover, the price of laser printed graphics is surprisingly low. It's practically negligible if you're already getting your panels milled there.


Peake
Yes, lazertran is a compromise.

Before getting panels etched etc. using my artwork know they weren't done to a template and some of the lines don't line up...worth editing them if building a system.
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Music Tech DIY Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10  Next [all]
Page 2 of 10
Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group