MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index
 FAQ & Terms of UseFAQ & Terms Of Use   Wiggler RadioMW Radio   Muff Wiggler TwitterTwitter   Support the site @ PatreonPatreon 
 SearchSearch   RegisterSign up   Log inLog in 
WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

Ideas for Movement
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Production Techniques  
Author Ideas for Movement
SunRa
How do you guys add movement in your tracks?

I usually have edited scene+performance pages on Rytm for drums. On the modular, mainly, filter sweeps, delay and feedback, reverb feedback, playing with decay and release and modulation to any parameter of taste.

Any other idea?? Or any good technique or preference for the ones I mentioned??
slumberjack
- slow lfo's on cutoff for snare, clap and hihats

- keeping at least the pattern of one instrument on a different time signature (i prefer a six bar loop there)

- keep some lfos / envelopes free running, hand tapped and synced but uneven pinged (i use monome meadowphysics for this)

- different depths of reverb also panned reverb

- sequenced parameters in general

- also samples like fieldrecordingsvfor more background stuff which are not in sync
noisejockey
When OP says movement, I think dynamics and modulation. You basically have volume, pitch, timbre, speed/time, and stereo position to play with. Break it down like this and you have a lot of options.

Totally agree with slumberjack on having some stuff free running as opposed to tempo synched.

OP's initial list is good, too.

Don't forget automated pan positions (literal movement), phasing, chorus, and LFO'd additive techniques like wavefolding. Try modulating the tempo a little or a lot, or at least modulating clock divisions. Modulate clocked delay times. Put filters, folders, or phasers on your effects loops. Modulate wet/dry to pull elements front and back. Modulate octave switching.

Of course, balance all this with something anchored, usually bass or vocals...but that's tradition, not a rule.

So many fun options!
rauch
i often use a slow flanger on hihats, snare, bass or a synth parts and phasers on strings and pads

i’m always learning a lot about movement by listening to early dub like king tubby and try to play with the mixer and effects like delay, reverb and phasers like an instrument. it‘s just crazy how much they made out of what they got.
GuyaGuy
CHORD CHANGES
jloveland
Absolutely flange or phase stuff. Manually adjust the synths (knobs). "play" the drum machine live.
slumberjack
jloveland wrote:
Absolutely flange or phase stuff. Manually adjust the synths (knobs). "play" the drum machine live.


+1 / turn of quatization
lisa
GuyaGuy wrote:
CHORD CHANGES

hihi

I like using random or off beat sources to make rather drastiskt changed (add effects, filtrering, volume, pan, etc). It can be quite crude in my productions but often works as a separate groove.
orangehexagon
GuyaGuy wrote:
CHORD CHANGES


haha yeah, very important and often over looked in these parts!!

in terms of techno and some "experimental" music where there aren't many chord changes... you should look into the interplay of all elements as a whole and also timbrel shifts. subtle adjustments over time can make a world of difference if everything interlocks nicely.
criticalmonkey
this waves plugin
Brauer Motion
using in more experimental ideas- pretty much chasing it on every gesture element -
more standard song stuff - on song section changes
would love to get my hands on the hardware it is based on but not likely

and also use lots of haas effect tricks - crossfading between two opposite images and such - great for depth

and lately - reamping and swinging a mic around the speaker - the doppler effect can make non pitched elements really dance
and create some cool detuned effects with pitched stuff - though minimal control on my swinging, haven't sorted the math speed thing for any accuracy
JustGlyphs
For the modular: really slow LFO's like the NLC Sloths

Plug-ins: coloration software can add movement, especially if done multiband. Apply an effect to the lows, mids and highs but change the dry/wet for each band throughout the piece.

Also side-chaining is really powerful; getting different parts of a song reacting to itself! Not just for kick drums and compression.

I agree with others and think changing the time signature and key/mode can do great things in a music.
Richie Jape
do long takes instead of audio looping ..

if you have a sequence like some one above said, 'play it' and tweak to your hearts content ..

do stuff you think is 'wrong' you can always delete but you'll sometimes do something that will blow your mind ....

oh and one other COOL trick i tried out yesterday,

i made a really nice audio tape loop on my nagra ...

it was all off the grid n'stuff ... i was trying to figure out a way to sequence stuff over this wonky loop ...

then it hit me ... audio envelope follower to cv ...

then i had the cv from this loop and was able to do all sorts of magical things with my shared system

it took a while to find the sweet spot but once it hit it had a beautiful movement completely off the grid ...

love
Buttons ARE toys
Don't overlook SILENCE. Putting some breathing room between phrases, rather than keeping the loops hitting hard over and over without a break really adds to a song, makes the loud parts louder, makes the melodies seem more meaningful, and keeps peoples' ears from getting fatigued.

Call and response is another easy way to add interest, even if its just sending the same sequence to two different oscillators and flip flopping between which one plays the part each time.
slumberjack
Richie Jape wrote:


then it hit me ... audio envelope follower to cv ...



get one with trigger out and a clock to midi module. (i suggest both from ladik. you'll need a clock multiplier to speed up the rate in that case.)
then you'll sync your everthinginthestudio to this loop.
slumberjack
Buttons ARE toys wrote:
Don't overlook SILENCE.


thank for the reminder...! applause
decklyn
What are you using for a daw? I usually try to finish the track and then sweep over it and add a bunch of little variation.
If you're talking about on your patches, add some automation. Eg in Serum I usually morph the waveform with an LFO or even just add track automation on the filter to make it fit.
https://soundcloud.com/decklyn/motokos-song
This track is a lot more boring than a lot of the stuff on my soundcloud IMO but you can hear I tried at least to add extra interest and variation.
Eg for the bass, I automate the filter cutoff but I also have waveform shaping happening to add some extra interest. It's still a bit boring but I tried to add a lot of small differences through the transitions, add a couple extra kicks here and there etc.
Richie Jape
slumberjack wrote:
Richie Jape wrote:


then it hit me ... audio envelope follower to cv ...



get one with trigger out and a clock to midi module. (i suggest both from ladik. you'll need a clock multiplier to speed up the rate in that case.)
then you'll sync your everthinginthestudio to this loop.


the e510 ? i'll definitely pick one up thanks for the tip ...

i've got a tempi for clock dividing purposes
slumberjack
Richie Jape wrote:
slumberjack wrote:
Richie Jape wrote:


then it hit me ... audio envelope follower to cv ...



get one with trigger out and a clock to midi module. (i suggest both from ladik. you'll need a clock multiplier to speed up the rate in that case.)
then you'll sync your everthinginthestudio to this loop.


the e510 ? i'll definitely pick one up thanks for the tip ...

i've got a tempi for clock dividing purposes


jep i got two of the E-510. i'm on that train since a while. it's tricky to run it in perfection. the m-330 does every 24 ticks a step.
lerba
Definitely different time signatures / loop lengths is key here. Sometimes it works well on melodies as well as rhythmic elements
unexpectedbowtie
Buttons ARE toys wrote:
Don't overlook SILENCE. Putting some breathing room between phrases, rather than keeping the loops hitting hard over and over without a break really adds to a song, makes the loud parts louder, makes the melodies seem more meaningful, and keeps peoples' ears from getting fatigued.


This is a good tip, and something I always forget. Now I try to make sure to go back once I have recorded everything in the DAW and delete parts to give some more dynamism.
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Production Techniques  
Page 1 of 1
Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group