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WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

Production game changers!
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Production Techniques  
Author Production game changers!
clapclap
Let's talk about gear that has just flat out made you just flat out more productive in your studio. This could be a VST, synth, DAW, effect or just anything that has made you into an efficient producer. Instead of focusing on just the gear that you envy for aesthetic purposes or just overall sound I want to start a discussion on gear that makes your work come together as opposed to making you feel less focused on say the end goal of completing a song.

I'll start off with throwing out what is flowing with me at the moment. First of all I picked up an Ableton Push and it is upping my drum game for sure. Working in Ableton to just knock out the drum transitions really makes my newest songs work dynamically. I hate to add a bit of gear envy already but it makes me wanna go for the Push 2 for the nicer pads.

Additionally I found out by actually selling some synths, creating some space in my studio, and organizing my studio has given myself a better mental space to work on my music. I would love to hear what works for y'allllll.
Soy Sos
Last week I had to abruptly swap out my monitor pair in the studio
from the Mackies I've been using for years to a mid priced 8" JBL pair.
The JBL's felt less low and so I added a Mackie sub this weekend
that's rated down to 20hz. Setting the crossover to 60hz and
playing with levels, i've found a setting that gives me a better sense
of the subharmonics. I've been doing a lot of listening to commercial
source material and cross checking old mixes.
I've got a very well treated and custom built room and it's sounding even more balanced!

Feeling very pleased!
calaveras
I used to be all about trying to have a studio that has all the same pieces that a 'real studio' has.
So I had to have a mixer, patchbay, outboard effects and a bunch of patch cables. You know, so you have maximum routing flexibility, for all those late night incredibly sophisticated things you are surely going to do. lol

I later on figured out that I work faster and better just having a couple good preamps plugged into ch1 and ch2. I'm not re-patching things a lot unless I just bought something new, and then it just gets patched to my overflow audio interface.
The patch bay and mixer were useful for very specific uses, but were simply adding complexity to my setup that I wasn't exploiting beyond 'oh look a master volume fader'.

I never really got around to multing a signal so I could use it to key a dynamics processor. Or using the inserts on the mixer to pre-process a signal before it goes through the rest of the mixer.

I think especially when you are working as an individual, it's helpful to have that engineering side simplified and buttoned down. So that you can just flick a switch and record. Not have to plug a cable in beyond picking up a guitar or a synth.
(oops I forget to wrap up my train of thought).
So I have a UA LA610 MKII and a Summit 2BA221. Each pre has a distinct tone. And both have a number of little things that distinguish them for different roles. I prefer one for guitar, the other for bass. Neither for my voice seriously, i just don't get it
dubonaire
Two piece of hardware really made a different for me: a Soundcraft MTK22 mixing desk, and a Cirklon.
xparis001
for me, it was adding a Burl Vancouver summing amp to my setup. it sounds amazing, especially when the track count is getting igh. i honestly wanted to believe it wasnt true, and summing amps didnt matter, but as soon as I heard it, I knew. I brought others in, just to make sure I wasnt crazy, and 3 people, one untrained ear, one bedroom producer, and one pro all could blindly pick the better sounding mix, and each time it was the vancouver.
The Goob
Neumann KH 120 monitors have made a big difference in being able to get things sounding good quickly

Using Ableton for sequencing makes it so easy to work in a non-linear way and try different musical ideas out
Ranxerox
I wouldn't say a game changer exactly, but I acquired a set of Lucid 88192 AD/DA converters earlier in the year, which opened up my sound a bit and made it easier to send stuff in and out of my DAW for processing.

Gribs
RME Fireface 800 (have had it a long time)
Presonus Central Station (also a long time friend)
Patch bays
Jettisoning a workstation keyboard and getting just an 88 key controller instead.
DiscoDevil
Pioneer SP-16
Zaquencer

Those two pieces changed everything for me.
clapclap
calaveras - that same approach worked for me as well. I was trying to do what you described minus the patch bay although I considered one for some time. I even have a 4 track tape machine that doesn't get much use sitting there. I keep convincing myself I'm gonna bounce more tracks down to tape from ableton or just record some drums to achieve that nice tape compression for some samples but I rarely do.

Simplifying typically works better for me.
memes_33
no single piece of gear has really changed things substantially in my setup, other than general "modular" gear has made it so i don't ever finish any "productions".

one concept that has accelerated my biggest challenge (final mixing) is ill gates' "128s" strategy. the strategy itself is specific to ableton live, where you capture sounds you like/create into a library of 128 samples, and allows you to scroll through sounds on-the-fly to find things that work well together sonically. the idea is that if you build tracks based on sounds that already work well together, your time mixing is greatly reduced.

this concept is difficult to apply to modular for obvious reasons, but the larger concept of dedicating time to designing sounds and building libraries vs. actual arrangement/production time can be somewhat applied. if you have some spare time, or are just not in a creatively inspired mood, put that time into making it easier when you are inspired. the easier/quicker it is for you to access useful tools when you are in that creative space ends up paying off.

this concept is probably most useful for beat-oriented music (for me, its most useful on drum sounds)
thisoldmike
I picked up an Elektron Digitakt when they first came out, and over the last few months I've been incredibly productive with it. I'm impressed with how it allows me to quickly and easily put together the bones of a song, drive the modular rig (via a CV.OCD), and simultaneously sequence my Micromonsta and Korg MS2000. It's remarkably intuitive and just a blast to play with.
Muzone
calaveras wrote:
I used to be all about trying to have a studio that has all the same pieces that a 'real studio' has......


Takes a while to realise this, but then it's biscuits and gravy all the way smile
spinach_pizza
thisoldmike wrote:
I picked up an Elektron Digitakt when they first came out, and over the last few months I've been incredibly productive with it. I'm impressed with how it allows me to quickly and easily put together the bones of a song, drive the modular rig (via a CV.OCD), and simultaneously sequence my Micromonsta and Korg MS2000. It's remarkably intuitive and just a blast to play with.


thumbs up
tron23
dubonaire wrote:
Two piece of hardware really made a different for me: a Soundcraft MTK22 mixing desk, and a Cirklon.


This. Proper mixer and a good sequencer! Guinness ftw!
RadioTelefonik
My workflow slowed right the hell down in recent years, but the minute I booted up a Casio RZ-1, I started pumping out tracks like mad. They were all lofi house tools, but the immediacy of the machine really got me back into enjoying music production again. That and the decreased pressure of making things sound 'polished'. It was just fun to make tunes again.
SB-SIX
The real game changers for me were ableton back in the days and now bitwig. Without them, music making would still feel like work instead of fun. And of course eurorack.
rod_zero
Ableton Live, I tried Reaper and cubase before and din't get with them.

Ableton Push, really put the fun back in to making music with software.

RME Fireface UC, unrivaled quality and stability, it is invaluable to have a "problem free" set up.

Syntorial, really helped me learning synthesis like never before.

Melodics, using this to improve my chops, even if I hate the majority of the music used it is good for having structured practicing schedules.
noisejockey
In order:

RME Fireface
Eurorack
Crane Song HEDD
Buchla
Dangerous Music Liaison
slumberjack
six years ago: as soon as i found out how to work with a hardware sequencer my workflow changed (had no clue before about midi other than plug a microControl into ableton) - since the cirklon arrived two years later everything is different.

last year: as soon as i switched from ableton to reaper my mixes instantly sounded way more clear. i use ableton rewired for specific needs now.

now: my guts says i should overthink my 40ch mixingdesk for multi tracking.
MarcelP
dubonaire wrote:
Two piece of hardware really made a different for me: a Soundcraft MTK22 mixing desk, and a Cirklon.


I second the MTK22 - streamlined workflow and sonic clarity straight out of the box. Excellent for working with Modular.
Carrousel
dubonaire wrote:
Two piece of hardware really made a different for me: a Soundcraft MTK22 mixing desk, and a Cirklon.


Yep Cirklon definitely for me. I like to record everything at once and I was never able to create complex multi-part synchronised changes in a satisfactory way before (struggling with only 2 hands and also latency). Cirklon has allowed me to create entire songs live before hitting record and capturing it all in one.

I guess the mixer is the other part of it too, being able to 'dub mix' the recording as the cirklon sequences it out. So yeah, I agree with Dubonaire (although I haven't used a soundcraft). I use a Mixwizard and a pair of MOTUs.
giugno
Using Logic has helped me expand my horizons a lot. Being able to easily add soft synths to recordings made with hardware allows me to do a lot that i couldnt before. Ableton never really clicked with me.
BikerDude
Most people are way more technical than I am.
I just try to get things recorded with the levels being close to right.
So my big biggest additions are pretty basic.
Once I started putting everything through a mixing board to my digital multitrack that saved me tweaking everything on the recorder which is a pain on the little tiny screen. And also adding a vocal processor helped me not need to mess around in the recorder.

I prefer to have everything that I need to tweak outside the recorder.
I like physical dials and sliders. Turn it up. Turn it down. Click on an effect and adjust the level. Much better than clicking through screens.
Michael O.
A large-format board with an integral patchbay (16 rows of 48 TT jacks) increased my productivity and efficiency in a huge way. Having all the routing, eq settings, in/out levels, aux, etc. in an easy to comprehend and visually organized format is a major game changer.

A proper pathbay benefits productions of any size. Not having to climb behind racks to alter signal chains saves time and therefore money.

Synth-wise, ditching pc and Mac for Atari ST’s running Notator/Creator has made composing, arranging, and recording with midi-equipped instruments a breeze. Not having to deal with bloated contemporary sequencers that seemed to always end up crashing at the worst time avoids tons of frustration. Plus the timing is incomparably tighter.
Abston
By my side, the game changer was to start my eurorack system ! Next step will be some audio processing gears (API or NEVE channel strip are coming)
big job head
Big game changer for me was working on protools for movies. It made me realize how efficient i could be working with audio material instead of programming everything in midi.
i make music with ableton live but instead of keeping everything in midi til the end as i used to do, i now record audio material as soon as i can and work with that. So much powerful and efficient to me.
And obviously eurorack has been a big big game changer!!
Dcramer
Assistant Engineer did it fer me...
racooniac
i tried to save a few bucks on audio interfaces and struggled a lot with wasting time and energy until i finally went and got myself an used rme fireface uc which ... just WORKS.

oh is it nice to just be productive again xD
CF3
Snake Cables/DB25 cables.
Zip ties/Velcro ties.
Making templates.
Labeling stuff.
Nice desk set up/Ergonomics.

Gear comes and goes...... The real game changer for me is keep everything organized and easily accessible.
mrerdat
Using VCV with Soundflower (I'm on Mac) as part of an aggregate sound driver that includes my regular i/o allows me to patch my software modular into my hardware modular and back, and lets me record it all in my DAW. Total game changer...
mor4sso
elektron
circadianeyes
Mikron Cascade is my newest inspiration. Finally something different than a Valhalla Shimmer.
depth of field
About a year ago I invested in better monitors for mixing my productions. I had been using the Yamaha HS8s for a few years and liked them well enough. Last year I purchased the Focal Shape 50s. Afterwards I found my mixes got a lot cleaner and clearer. Apart from just getting better at mixing itself, having good quality monitors has really been a game changer for me. Now I'm looking to upgrade my audio interface to really maximize the sonic quality of my work.
justin3am
The last 10 years I've been making changes to my studio which have forced me to slow down and become less efficient. I really appreciated the whole experience because it has forced me to focus on the things I enjoy most about tracking and mixing. I finished a lot less but the quality of my work has improved, IMO.

A few years ago I picked up an Alyseum AL88c, which has been very nice. I have two now, hooked up via a gigabit ethernet switch and I can access both interfaces from any computer in my house (even more than one computer at the same time). I tend to do little sketches on my laptop and then want to record the output into my desktop but now, I can just send MIDI to my synths from any computer. I don't need to worry about migrating files. It may not sound like a big deal but it helps me to stay in the moment.

Bitwig was another big change. I used Live as a sketchpad and Pro Tools for mixing and editing, for years, when I worked for AVID. Now I do almost everything (except video, of course) in Bitwig and the CV I/O devices make it that much more useful.

I wouldn't call any one thing a "game changer", just incremental improvements, but they add up to an enjoyable way of working.

Now I finally coming around to the idea that I need a proper desk chair. I hate sitting at desks, so I don't have one at home. But I have just been using shitty folding chairs, so my back is starting to kill me. lol
Richie Jape
a non equipment definite game changer for me was putting the love into every element from the start onwards ...

taking time to get exactly the correct sound for every element, working slower and more thoughtfully ...

instead of rushing an idea down, knowing that taking time over the first few elements and making them with love will lead to much better results in the end ...

i could summarize as ... don't rush ... enjoy

in terms of equipment, in order to begin most recent things i've been making tape loops on my nagra and enjoying the element of chance this provides to kickstart something interesting ...

you are constantly learning and constantly improving but there's always so much further to go ...

it's the best feeling ... love
JustGlyphs
Weird sequencing software has helped me a lot. I struggle with coming up with interesting, non-basic rhythms and stuff like Max and Reaktor has helped a ton.

In a similar vein but with more broad applications, Din Is Noise. A beautiful and feral program.
calaveras
two other things that have worked for me a lot.

Getting a book for whatever software I am working in and just going front to back on that suck and learning every GD key combination and all the stupid sub menus. It may take up a few evenings and weekends you would rather be out socializing. But hey, it's the modern equivalent of woodshedding.

The other thing is buy once, cry once. Don't fuck around with shitty gear. Get the right tool for the job and move on.
Easy to say when you have middle class or better money. But you know what, even back when I was making only $11 an hour. I'd just save up. And I don't regret the good quality things I bought. I do regret the cheap garbage.
slumberjack
calaveras wrote:
I'd just save up. And I don't regret the good quality things I bought. I do regret the cheap garbage.


If you compare to lets say a screwdriver. your work benefits in time and pleasure if you go with the nice line for more grip and if you choose the right size - especially in the worst case, when the head is already worn or when it's a rusty old (suddenly ODB appears with me) b*tch.
So to say it's nice to have professional tools in the deluxe range during normal operation but key when you have a difficult job to do.

but: to not over extend you budget (and yes, still keep that in mind even if's your paid like lawyer...), the high pirce stuff you only need in you key work.
If you need the screwdriver only once a month for 5 screws to fix, you might don't have to pay double of the price, but if it's part of your routine, and your customers expect a perfect job on this, go ahead...

so to say if you're keen on verbs and scultural 3D sounddesign, save up for a bricasti. (talking to myself). if you need verb only to extend your snare, you're be fine with a used pedal...
decklyn
+1 on ill gate's 128s
I don't really do that more recently but i was spending time building projects up.
I'd say drum rack did have a big impact on my workflow in general. I used to use straight audio but i find drumrack helps me move faster without making as much of a mess.

Id say also parallel compression on my drum buss suprisingly has been helping me move quicker in the early phases. I've been using the uad neve 33609 on the send channel just crushed. It's colorfull so i feel pleased faster.

And serum changed my life. Probably the biggest boost to productivity for writing for me personally because i can always hop in and make the sound im looking for now that i know the wavetables. My analog gear hasn't been in as much use after buying serum. The fx are good so I'll use them for other sound design tasks (eg recently trying to make bass in fm8 and using the serum multiband compression and other fx)

Otherwise i always try to finish tunes fast to build good habits around output.instead of noodling. I'm never scared to throw stuff away that sounds decent if i find new inspiration in the session - most of my better work comes up like that i find.

And i found a mentor too so i always have fresh seeds of inspiration and feedback which helps.
calaveras
decklyn wrote:

Otherwise i always try to finish tunes fast to build good habits around output.instead of noodling. I'm never scared to throw stuff away that sounds decent if i find new inspiration in the session - most of my better work comes up like that i find.


as they say don't be afraid to kill your children. (your artistic children, not your progeny!)

I sometimes will go through and lay down a couple different takes on the same basic track. Then end up throwing away the first version of the bass line, melody and stuff.

Occasionally I'll do a 'save as' and make a copy of a project in another folder so I can just go to town without fear of trashing anything on the original.
More often than not the second version ends up being the better version. Because I've got a safety copy, I am not being too precious about it. I just go for the jugular and try whatever occurs to me without too much noodling around.

The really cool thing about this, is that if you lay down a whole new set of tracks on top of your basics, you can always cut in the original set of tracks during a bridge or a verse section for an interesting change in direction.



The other funny thing that I have noticed recently. I used to always write songs in my head. And work on them with my guitar, bass or keys when I had time in the evening. This is a much different workflow than what I have evolved in the last 10 years. Now that I have hardware and software sequencing, all my song sketches are saved someplace outside of my head. So they never really progress into different patterns and rhythms the way they do when you play through the song dozens of times.
So lately I've been trying to recapture some of that. I still do my basic beats in an Elektron box or some softsynth drum machine. But I will spend a lot longer working on the melodic bits and the bass line. Just looping through the beat and playing it over and over for hours to explore the phrasing and how to build it over several measures, instead of the same thing going blat blat blat.
Gringo Starr
xparis001 wrote:
for me, it was adding a Burl Vancouver summing amp to my setup. it sounds amazing, especially when the track count is getting igh. i honestly wanted to believe it wasnt true, and summing amps didnt matter, but as soon as I heard it, I knew. I brought others in, just to make sure I wasnt crazy, and 3 people, one untrained ear, one bedroom producer, and one pro all could blindly pick the better sounding mix, and each time it was the vancouver.


I find this intriguing. I’ve been wondering about a summing mixer. I’ve never used one but I have this fantasy that it pulls everything together in the right place. Could you go into detail a little more about the quality of the track that stood out from the others?
Moskowitz
Biggest game changer by far:

Sample accurate sync
Sample accurate midi

Having hardware and software / daw run in perfect sync allowing overdubs and re-recording of fluffed takes etc means compositional and production enablement at a level that is night and day vs not having it.
Yodhan
After spending a few years as an intern at a real studio, I had a hard time with my home setup. A patchbay and Presonus Faderport helped with that a lot.
criticalmonkey
for me
not gear - it's the ease of the setup - properly labeled patch bays, comprehensive routing with naming in daw and i/o - easy reach cables -
ergonomics - zeroed out mixer/hardware to start with - i don't want to think i want to do the music thing and i'll toss anything that disrupts that -

i routinely work in 4 different rooms at the office plus my home studio and each of them is pretty different - daw different, speakers are different , mixer/no mixer, 4 different room controllers, not to mention different sizes and acoustic treatment- but as long as the flow is easy to follow i don't even notice which room i'm in once i start working

i spent 20 hours in my home studio rebuilding templates in my daws and the new i/o and patchbay labels - and i still have more to go
just cause i added 3 pieces -tube di's, es-8 i/o and a dedicated re-amp box
and some new soft synths - that sound great through a tube di:-)
i have a template with every soft synth i own preloaded so it's easy to access from the start,
i have template versions for routing depending on if mixing in surround or stereo or both and a few kinda starter mix templates for specific project types - people or platforms i keep doing things with

i hate any mental blocker

only time i really really care about gear - not counting music instruments - is mastering - then i want the right hardware and the revealing speakers in the super tuned room that i have hand picked for the purpose -
i think that is required for that job
Technologear?
1. Custom made standing table. I'm fit enough to tolerate standing up for hours, it promotes me to move and physically adjust gear without hesitation, and my criteria for mix success is if it makes me dance. Be comfortable, create more.
2. Harrison Mixbus. I used Reaper for a decade but I got bored of it. Mixbus suits me, I'm back mixing my tracks again
3. Working relationship with my mastering engineer. Took us a few tracks to get there but it's great now.
4. Phone call to my bank to set up a savings account and fortnightly small deposit. This is the buy once cry once strategy put into effect
5. "I wonder if I can do that with the gear I already have..." and trying. Kills GAS, increases knowledge and productivity
6. Zoom h4n in 4 track mode. Limitations are good for me.
MoogCloud
When I finally upgraded to a "real" mixer. My Allen & Heath ZED 60 has completely changed how multiple tracks are mixed.
LHOOQtius
Ableton Live literally made me 100x more productive (I have the file history to prove it), because I started life as a cassette loop guy (but eventually just couldn't freakin' take the tedious, breakage-prone workflow of cassettes) and the long, open-ended roll of Logic and Cubase were just not everything I needed. Sure, I can still record long takes sometimes, but playing with piles of loops is home for me.
tenshun
The Motu Ultralite MK3 really helped me out on capturing all my sounds into my computer. With the 8 inputs i can have everything separated.
Also it can be used by itself with out the computer as a mixer as well.

Another thing that helped out for me was the Neumann KH 120 monitors.
They just made alot of my mixing sound really good.
addendum
Playing programmed/ sequenced stuff by hand for comparison.

Some musicians/ produces may want to avoid that deliberately, in order to not interrupt the "machine-y" feel of what they do and what they want to express. But for me, I feel it has always made my sequences better.
fanwander
I had two game changers in my musical life:

1.) Multitracking.
Beeing able to record a track, and then record another track and another and ..., that was incredibly inspiring. In fact, it was not recording any instrument, but recording my voice. I was used from real life to hear several instruments playing at the same time. So it is nothing special to hear several tracks I played. But in my real life I cannot hear myself several times. Singing many tracks with my own voice and hearing those 'choirs' was mindblowing.
For me it was a Tascam 144 cassette deck.

2.) Learning, that its not the equipment.
I had started to work as an engineer in recording studios in 1982, but it took me seven years until I had a customer, who made such a beautiful music that it made me cry, though she used only a casio home keyboard (not the sample based ones from to day, but a really ugly sounding from the 80s...).
dubonaire
fanwander wrote:
I had two game changers in my musical life:


2.) Learning, that its not the equipment.
I had started to work as an engineer in recording studios in 1982, but it took me seven years until I had a customer, who made such a beautiful music that it made me cry, though she used only a casio home keyboard (not the sample based ones from to day, but a really ugly sounding from the 80s...).


That's a wonderful story.
DJMaytag
Bussing. I started out in DAW's not using ANY sort of buss system, and that was a carryover from an analog 8-Buss console where I never understood how to utilize busses for processing/grouping certain sounds (I literally never assigned anything to a buss, as I thought that was only for multitracking things to ADATs and the like). That's been a HUGE improvement in sound for my music.

Multitracking. I used to have doubles of many pieces of gear, just so I could have that type of sound twice or doing different things. It's a totally different compositional mindset for me now, to try to think ahead a bit about what I want to do, so I can try to lay out a song structure and then go over it with the same synth but a different melody or patch.

Patchbays Such a major PITA to set up, but SO worth it once it's done! No more major reconfigurations, no trying to get around to the back of the gear... just plug and play!
ZLAL
Another vote for a patch bay. Synths are heavy, table space is limited, organization tickles my brain in the right way. Finally setting up a patch bay correctly and integrating most of my studio has made what was an impenetrable collection of gear immediate and usable.
MindMachine
^ I was just typing 'patchbay'. I still underutilize them. But I have two rack patchbays and one small floating ART patchbay that have changed things. I am still not fully functional or understanding as to how they can fully be used, but in my simple usage, they have been game changing.
tanglefuzz
Installed a patchbay last week and it really changed my workflow in an awesome way. It's so easy to switch setup now without having to get behind my gear. Love it!
Default1
Renoise to play hardware via midi. Beautiful programme. Very quick and easy to compose in.

Composing music: a new approach. Book by William Russo. The first time I was able to grapple with music theory.
widdly
Buying a set of 8 different coloured XLR cables for my mic's and DI boxes, then matching the track colours in Ableton Live to the cable colours. So much less confusion when recording the bands jams.
dopeboy_magic
I just got a yocto 2 808 clone that I’m slaving to my octatrack and despite its limitaions (no pgm change) it’s straight breathing life into my tracks and is the the funnest box I’ve ever messed with.
Michael O. wrote:


Synth-wise, ditching pc and Mac for Atari ST’s running Notator/Creator has made composing, arranging, and recording with midi-equipped instruments a breeze. Not having to deal with bloated contemporary sequencers that seemed to always end up crashing at the worst time avoids tons of frustration. Plus the timing is incomparably tighter.


Michael super intersted in these! Proceeding down the internet foxhole to learn more.

What console/converter/usb interface combinations are people using? Currently have a soundcraft 200b I’m tracking out of I really like but would like to utilize all 20 channels. Considering a rme digiface with the ferrofish 16 converter at $1500 for both.

I’d like to ditch the computer all together sometimes because the 200b is made to go to tape with group outs and all the necessary channel routing I just haven’t delved into it yet Rockin' Banana!
vromr
Practice with Ableton Push + nativeKontrol extensions should get me towards the best workflow ever. I do think it's practice this time and not some combination of being over/under/mis-equipped.
DT
mrerdat wrote:
Using VCV with Soundflower (I'm on Mac) as part of an aggregate sound driver that includes my regular i/o allows me to patch my software modular into my hardware modular and back, and lets me record it all in my DAW. Total game changer...


can u explain a bit more?
naturligfunktion
1. The first drum machine I bought was a real game changer. Use it still today and it is very much a center piece of everything I do. Starting to get a bit bored of the sounds, so Im thinking to get a sampler.

2. Ableton. Such a nice program

3. My external mixingdesk Soundcraft MTK 12.

I went away from my studio for half a year however and then, the Keystep was great.

Im thinking now to get a good external sequencer.
Multi Grooves
My mind state.

Labelling things so there was little hindrance when I was ready to go.
joeTron
I just bought the Korg Karma. I love it for composing drums,bass,keys and synths on the spot without a computer. Use midi or audio outs if you want to add more and/or finish in a DAW.
BailyDread
Putting my modular on a desk that was suitably low to access from a chair

Ya think "har har a standing desk will surely make me dance around while I work, I bet that will make me create more compelling tunes"

Nope... your knees just hurt and you rush through takes so you don't have to keep standing for the 9th hour in a row.
BenA718
Biggest game changer for me the past several months was re designing my workflow so that there's no computer or tablet involved at all unless I'm multitracking.
Illwiggle
Discovering the power of recording things in Mono SlayerBadger!

Getting an sp1200 forced me to sample in mono, and forces you to send everything out on 8 outs or a single mono sum out... stereo is great but less flexible to work with, imo am not giving up much by saving stereo for last
Multi Grooves
BailyDread wrote:
Putting my modular on a desk that was suitably low to access from a chair

Ya think "har har a standing desk will surely make me dance around while I work, I bet that will make me create more compelling tunes"

Nope... your knees just hurt and you rush through takes so you don't have to keep standing for the 9th hour in a row.


The standing desk only works with an ergo stool like the Salli saddles ones...
naos
Buying a digital stereo delay (tc flashback), and jamming with it.
-->coupled with analog monos, immediate uncharted territories, things I'd never do on a DAW.
Panason
BailyDread wrote:


Nope... your knees just hurt and you rush through takes so you don't have to keep standing for the 9th hour in a row.


This is because of an incorrect posture, probably leaning forward too much. It is worth persevering with standing. Perhaps adjusting gear positioning will help. Knees should be unlocked but not bent- they are not meant to hold the weight of your upper your body, they are articulating joints. It is your entire skeleton and core muscles that naturally hold your body in an upright position.

Pains should go away after a few days of standing. A soft mat on the floor for standing on helps a lot. Sitting on your ass for 9 hours on a regular basis will likely lead to chronic back/hip pain and health issues. Regular breaks and movement is key whatever position you adopt.

Using an expensive stool is not standing... The point of standing is that your spine and hips are not being compressed, and core muscles are not being weakened by not being used.
coolshirtdotjpg
The biggest game changer in the past year has been the ER-101, being able to make edits in real time (like changing the length of a sequence, move it up by X number of semitones on after a certain number of repetitions, etc.) has been huge for me. Previously it took so much work to get to something beyond a 2-16 sequence, being able to do this on four tracks simultaneously is huge. I feel like I have finally found a way of writing music that makes sense to me.
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