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Started a Eurorack Vlog on Youtube
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Eurorack Modules Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next [all]
Author Started a Eurorack Vlog on Youtube
voicedrifter
Hey wigglers,

I hope this is not considered spammy self promotion, but I just wanted to leave a note to let you know that I have started a little vlog on my Youtube channel to document my first Eurorack case build. Hopefully I won't be crucified as much as Andrew Huang razz

Any way, let me know what you think, including any ideas, suggestions, or constructive criticism on where to take this. Full disclosure: I've actually got about 9 episodes pre-recorded already so there should be a pretty steady stream of content over the next few weeks if the reception in the Youtube community is positive.

Cheers,
Ryan

mgscheue
Nicely done! I look forward to more. (And from Andrew, too.)
Ranstedt
voicedrifter wrote:
Hey wigglers,

I hope this is not considered spammy self promotion

Considering you became a member just last month, have only 7 posts, and are promoting your youtube channel, I don't know what else to call it. lol

voicedrifter wrote:
Any way, let me know what you think, including any ideas, suggestions, or constructive criticism on where to take this.

First and foremost, do it for yourself and not as a way to get views / likes. Be genuine. Allow yourself to be vulnerable. Don't be too long winded. Edit to make the video more entertaining.

I really enjoyed Molton Modular's videos of him getting into modular. He's openly candid, has a great personality, and seems like he's having fun even though he admits at times that he might not always know what he's doing and the mistakes he makes. It comes across as very genuine to me. Overall I find him entertaining. I see the passion he has for this new journey he's taking.

Some of his videos...

Molten Modular 01 - Introduction to Eurorack Modular synthesis series
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mkr97N4jMEE

Molten Modular 06 - Choosing your first Eurorack modules
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MjFqI1yBMfo

Molten Modular 07 - Installing my first row of Eurorack modules
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cUORuDjbM9s

Molten Modular 08 - Update on the Eurorack journey so far
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DCkQ4YQDx0s

Molten Modular 11 - My second row of Eurorack
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kvaY6k4gww4

Molten Modular 14 - The inevitable 3rd row of Eurorack
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2j_R2i5eHME
LoFi Junglist
You almost have like 10,000 subscribers eek!

That was actually going to be my NewYears Resolution/goal for 2017-2018 hihi
cptnal
+1 for Robin Vincent's Molten Modular. He's been with me all the way and made it acceptable to not know what you're doing. zombie

And good luck to voicedrifter with your vlog. I'll give it its due attention later. thumbs up
mgscheue
A big fan of Molten, too.
voicedrifter
Yes, I am definitely a fan of Robin's style, and have been through all of his videos myself. While I definitely would love to put my own spin on things, I've been taking down similar notes on his authenticity and humble tone. Thanks gents!
Zube
voicedrifter wrote:
Hey wigglers,

I hope this is not considered spammy self promotion, but I just wanted to leave a note to let you know that I have started a little vlog on my Youtube channel to document my first Eurorack case build. Hopefully I won't be crucified as much as Andrew Huang razz

Any way, let me know what you think, including any ideas, suggestions, or constructive criticism on where to take this. Full disclosure: I've actually got about 9 episodes pre-recorded already so there should be a pretty steady stream of content over the next few weeks if the reception in the Youtube community is positive.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gIQs_eY4me8

Cheers,
Ryan


As someone with only a couple modular years under my belt, I wouldn't feel comfortable "teaching" others about it without many years more experience. Maybe in person, just the basics to a person completely lost. I wouldn't take piano lessons from someone who started playing a few months ago. We already have an overload of great YouTube people doing demos, tutorials. We have a ton of great basic patching videos. We already have the clickbait and the "how to get into modular" stuff too.

With only a few months in, what do you have to offer that is different? Is your goal entertainment, or instruction? Are you trying to be an artist, a presenter, promote another buisness/channel, or gain other employment? Is it about teaching others, or getting money and hits? Nothing fundamentally wrong with any of these reasons. But you can see the people that are beloved and respected are all about the former (teaching) far more than the latter(money).

I see what you're talking about wrt Andrew Huang threads... I'd say he was pretty thoroughly welcomed by most... Most people here vigorously defended him.

As a suggestion, make longer videos (20min+) that thoroughly cover a single topic or module, in a clear, complete way. A good example would be Frank Murder's 3-part VCA video... Or Raul's World of Synths... I find I watch less specific module videos and more interested in "general technique" videos.

Good luck and I look forward to see what your other topics will be.
LoFi Junglist
Zube wrote:
As someone with only a couple modular years under my belt, I wouldn't feel comfortable "teaching" others about it without many years more experience. . . . With only a few months in, what do you have to offer that is different?


I think that one of the most overlooked aspects of modular patching is all of the different approaches to patching that there are. You often see feedback from people along the lines of "I have that same module combo, but approach it like this..."

It's easy to experience in person if you know someone else with a modular, or you have a friend you trust with yours occasionally, but the nature of the hobby is there are more wigglers online than one person could ever hope to meet in real life.

Seeing Youtubers with small (approachable) rigs is perfect for watching how other people approach sound goals. It doesn't matter how much experience they have.
Dcramer
Welcome to Muff’s w00t
The Eurorack video world is getting pretty cramped these days but I’m sure that anything innovative will be welcomed.
These days, short videos that persuade Eurorack users to buy a specific new module are all the rage.
I don’t really see that trend abating anytime soon so the question is; will there be enough new modules released to satisfy the demand of YouTube video makers lol
woah
Personally, I’ve only ever been interested in advancing the state of the art of patching but these tend to be tricky videos to create, trying to explain a network of changing voltages in an educational way isn’t an easy task and may not hold the attention of new users who tend to think of Eurorack modules as being like big fancy guitar pedals that one simply strings together.
waah
Given your experience with DAWs, you may find your niche in video examples of modular hardware to software integration.
Good luck! w00t
smetak
Molten Modular is great! The guy has a natural talent for what he does - the series is a real pleasure to watch - big-time fan!
voicedrifter
Zube wrote:

As someone with only a couple modular years under my belt, I wouldn't feel comfortable "teaching" others about it without many years more experience.


Not defending or trying to argue; just love the discussion topic. I have to disagree a bit. I think there are varying degrees of mastery that can be conveyed by people of different levels. While it may not be of interest to a master wiggler, there's a much larger audience out there for the 101-type lessons that any one of us could offer. For the more experienced, I'd say one (not necessarily me) with experience making well-produced, effectively communicated, and entertaining content can often more than make up for any gap in knowledge. I suppose the debate there would just be whether or not that's just a superficial layer of sheen.

With that said, those videos take a lot of time and effort to get right, and I suspect the majority of my content will be more of a "holy shit, look what I just did 5 minutes ago by randomly plugging this cable into this hole" than a 20 minute tutorial. I find modular to be a very visually-magnetic art form, and I'm more inclined to upload a clean recording + video to YouTube with a little knob-twiddling than to upload tracks to SoundCloud. What a waste of all those flashing lights that would be, hey!?!

Zube wrote:

With only a few months in, what do you have to offer that is different? Is your goal entertainment, or instruction? Are you trying to be an artist, a presenter, promote another buisness/channel, or gain other employment? Is it about teaching others, or getting money and hits?


Obviously the goal for many is "to become a successful YouTuber". To stand out you want to offer a commodity that brings the most value. Personally, I've never really gone for that. I make good money elsewhere, and I'm not trying to build a career off this stuff.

As someone that has watched the view/subscriber counts and comments on their semi-successful channel over the years, I know exactly which types of content will be home runs. A sexy video on making your own acapella tracks for remixes is going to have a lot more mainstream value than one on how to create unique and interesting polyrhythmic/tuplet beats, or the utilitarian stuff like how to effectively save and manage midi-to-vst-parameter mappings in Ableton Live. But that hasn't stopped me from making the latter simply because it was interesting enough at the time to hit the record button, and that's genuine.

For me, personally, YouTube is first and foremost a social network, and the stuff I throw up there is the stuff I want to share with my close network of friends, with the added benefit allowing a wider audience to opt-in if they'd like. Just as with my friends and family, I'm only really going to talk about what is current and interesting to me, and right now that is Eurorack. So I may not be any of those things you listed; I'm just a regular dude hanging out in the space rather than trying to become the next massive YouTube success story. Like I said above, the primary goal will likely just be to share a patch or two with a handful of friends outside of the room other than my cat and my annoyed wife. razz
Zube
voicedrifter wrote:

I think there are varying degrees of mastery that can be conveyed by people of different levels. While it may not be of interest to a master wiggler, there's a much larger audience out there for the 101-type lessons that any one of us could offer. For the more experienced, I'd say one (not necessarily me) with experience making well-produced, effectively communicated, and entertaining content can often more than make up for any gap in knowledge. I suppose the debate there would just be whether or not that's just a superficial layer of sheen.


I'm not so sure the definition of "mastery" is so flexible. That's a pretty loose definition! Sure there's a larger audience of beginners, but they're already well served. What are you trying to do here? Make money, get an audience, teach, stay in touch with friends, or all of them at once? There are better ways to make money, or stay in touch with friends.

The ability to create a clean YouTube vid doesn't mean anything if what you're telling people is incorrect or incomplete. As a stone cold beginner, how would you know that your method of building a case is 4x more expensive and trouble than just buying one, just as one example? Another being the amount of new people to modular who think they absolutely need output modules first, without looking at the other stuff they already own first- perhaps recommending a $200 output module to people, and them not having a VCA or an LFO, for another example.

Everyone can of course learn a lot from beginners. And I get what you're saying about all levels of skill having something to offer. But everyone does the same things, same topics. Why not offer what you do that is special and unique to you.

voicedrifter wrote:
With that said, those videos take a lot of time and effort to get right, and I suspect the majority of my content will be more of a "holy shit, look what I just did 5 minutes ago by randomly plugging this cable into this hole" than a 20 minute tutorial.


There are literally thousands of people doing this, what makes what you're doing more interesting? I think that's a pretty valid question for someone looking for advice. What about you makes you interesting? Molten Modular, he's got his touchscreen angle, Flux and his podcast empire have the angle of coming from sample-based, hip-hop, consultation background. DivKid is a music teacher, multi-instrumentalist, if I'm remembering right. Colin Benders is one of the few people doing melodic music with multiple distinct parts and a lot of complicated ideas. Way too many more to list. Whether I like their music is not important, because I learn a lot from their content, and I appreciate the hard work they and many others do on so many levels. The angle I get from looking at your channel, of "software synth dude talking about his new Eurorack" is thoroughly saturated. As stated above, there are few people talking specifics about euro sync to DAW.


voicedrifter wrote:
Obviously the goal for many is "to become a successful YouTuber". To stand out you want to offer a commodity that brings the most value. Personally, I've never really gone for that. I make good money elsewhere, and I'm not trying to build a career off this stuff.

As someone that has watched the view/subscriber counts and comments on their semi-successful channel over the years, I know exactly which types of content will be home runs.


This does sound like someone who is trying to build a career off of this stuff, and that's the tone of your first video, it sounds like you want to build a following and do that semi-successful channel again, on a bigger level, to a wide audience, which is fine. But you should be clear about your intentions from the start, if not to the outside, then to yourself. If you already know what content is going to be a home run, then why are you asking the forum?


voicedrifter wrote:

For me, personally, YouTube is first and foremost a social network, and the stuff I throw up there is the stuff I want to share with my close network of friends, with the added benefit allowing a wider audience to opt-in if they'd like.


See I think the vast majority of people who would watch your videos, YouTube is a video content platform. To me a social network like Instagram or Twitter, don't have the "content creation --> audience" trajectory that YouTube does.

You say in your response you're just going to do 5 minute wiggles but in your OP you say you have nine videos already on deck... what are the topics you'll be discussing, or what techniques are you using in the wiggles?

If I seem a little brutal, I apologize. It's just that you're using the YouTube marketing terms, yet say you're doing this for love and don't care about that angle. That's ok, but it sends a bit of a mixed message. I have quite a few people in my life that do the YouTube thing- some professionally full time at high levels, some that try desperately to do it full time but never will, and one who wrote the book on youtube marketing (no, they actually co-wrote one of the marketing books everyone uses and copies.) I'm starting an Ableton based project for the first time in a couple of weeks, and I'll definitely take a look at your previous videos. I apologize for the "tough love" and if you're doing videos & music in the vein of the examples you used in your video, then I'm down to check it all out
Ranstedt
Dcramer wrote:
Welcome to Muff’s w00t
The Eurorack video world is getting pretty cramped these days but I’m sure that anything innovative will be welcomed.

I'm actually starting a youtube modular project on the 1st. It's unlike anything I've ever seen regarding modular. Time consuming Dead Banana We'll see. I'm fantastic at starting things I don't finish.
voicedrifter
Ranstedt wrote:

I'm actually starting a youtube modular project on the 1st. It's unlike anything I've ever seen regarding modular. Time consuming Dead Banana We'll see. I'm fantastic at starting things I don't finish.

Subscribed my friend!
JohnLRice
Welcome to Muff's voicedrifter! w00t

Your video was nicely produced and I'm sure you'll do well. thumbs up
voicedrifter
JohnLRice wrote:
Welcome to Muff's voicedrifter! w00t

Your video was nicely produced and I'm sure you'll do well. thumbs up

Thank you for the kind welcome John. I made my way over to your YouTube channel and was just blown away; consider me a fan. Definitely what one can aspire to!
JohnLRice
voicedrifter wrote:
JohnLRice wrote:
Welcome to Muff's voicedrifter! w00t

Your video was nicely produced and I'm sure you'll do well. thumbs up

Thank you for the kind welcome John. I made my way over to your YouTube channel and was just blown away; consider me a fan. Definitely what one can aspire to!
Thanks for the kind words! cool

Sometimes I feel I'm just not doing things "right" though? hmmm..... After over 8 years and over 400 videos posted, I have a little over 2,000 subscribers which I'm very pleased by and thankful for we're not worthy headbang Hug but seems low when compared to the high subscription level many many other channels that have been up a much shorter time and have far fewer videos. seriously, i just don't get it

Now, I'm mainly just in competition with myself and 'talking out loud' here but I've noticed things people do on popular channels that I rarely do myself:

Hearing The Person Talking: people love to listen to someone talk about anything, from just rambling about their average day to describing something in detail. I've only talked in a handful of my videos and usually opt for putting text descriptions on screen when needed since I'm usually demonstrating audio things, it makes sense not to talk over the top of it. But I suppose just having text makes my videos less useful/entertaining for people who don't like to read and especially for those who can't if English isn't their native language? I'm sure that hearing/speaking a foreign language is a different skill set than reading/writing one so . . . a lot of people from non-English speaking countries can probably make out what an English speaker is talking about but English text just looks like nonsensical scribbles? d'oh!

Watching People: People like watching people do things, it is interesting and often the easiest way to learn. Watching people as they talk is especially interesting and entertaining.

Consistency: While I do certain things in my videos so someone should have no doubt it's one of my videos (mainly the beginning and ending logo) my content varies a lot. Sometimes my videos are half assed and poorly produced and sometimes they are detailed and carefully produced. Sometimes I do product demos, sometimes music videos, sometimes something in-between and sometimes I'm just messing around randomly and throw that up on my channel. Sometimes I do drones, sometimes melodic compositions, sometimes noise, usually instrumental but occasionally with vocals. Video length varies greatly, anywhere from 2 minutes to 30 minutes. So . . .I'm sure I lose a lot of subscribers because they may like one thing I did and subscribe but then the next several videos are nothing like it so unsubscribe.

OK, morning coffee is wearing off! meh lol Food for thought for all YouTubers? spinning
esko997
Dcramer wrote:
trying to explain a network of changing voltages in an educational way isn’t an easy task


You do a great job Dcramer, the flowcharts help a lot. Can only imagine how long it takes not only to do up the patch, but to be charting/tracking it the whole time as well.
InterPhase
I may be in the minority here, but my number one pet peeve about youtube videos in general, not just modular content, is the editing done where all pauses and breaks between sentences are cut away leaving the presenter coming across as ultra-hyperactive and annoying. Just about every single youtuber who does edit their videos is doing exactly this, so maybe it's just me..?

That said, I welcome more modular synth content and look forward to see what you come up with next! smile
Dcramer
JohnLRice wrote:
voicedrifter wrote:
JohnLRice wrote:
Welcome to Muff's voicedrifter! w00t

Your video was nicely produced and I'm sure you'll do well. thumbs up

Thank you for the kind welcome John. I made my way over to your YouTube channel and was just blown away; consider me a fan. Definitely what one can aspire to!
Thanks for the kind words! cool

Sometimes I feel I'm just not doing things "right" though? hmmm..... After over 8 years and over 400 videos posted, I have a little over 2,000 subscribers which I'm very pleased by and thankful for we're not worthy headbang Hug but seems low when compared to the high subscription level many many other channels that have been up a much shorter time and have far fewer videos. seriously, i just don't get it

Now, I'm mainly just in competition with myself and 'talking out loud' here but I've noticed things people do on popular channels that I rarely do myself:

Hearing The Person Talking: people love to listen to someone talk about anything, from just rambling about their average day to describing something in detail. I've only talked in a handful of my videos and usually opt for putting text descriptions on screen when needed since I'm usually demonstrating audio things, it makes sense not to talk over the top of it. But I suppose just having text makes my videos less useful/entertaining for people who don't like to read and especially for those who can't if English isn't their native language? I'm sure that hearing/speaking a foreign language is a different skill set than reading/writing one so . . . a lot of people from non-English speaking countries can probably make out what an English speaker is talking about but English text just looks like nonsensical scribbles? d'oh!

Watching People: People like watching people do things, it is interesting and often the easiest way to learn. Watching people as they talk is especially interesting and entertaining.

Consistency: While I do certain things in my videos so someone should have no doubt it's one of my videos (mainly the beginning and ending logo) my content varies a lot. Sometimes my videos are half assed and poorly produced and sometimes they are detailed and carefully produced. Sometimes I do product demos, sometimes music videos, sometimes something in-between and sometimes I'm just messing around randomly and throw that up on my channel. Sometimes I do drones, sometimes melodic compositions, sometimes noise, usually instrumental but occasionally with vocals. Video length varies greatly, anywhere from 2 minutes to 30 minutes. So . . .I'm sure I lose a lot of subscribers because they may like one thing I did and subscribe but then the next several videos are nothing like it so unsubscribe.

OK, morning coffee is wearing off! meh lol Food for thought for all YouTubers? spinning


I love your vids John, and as someone with an even smaller following than you, let me give you some hot tips on my race to the bottom!
Firstly, like you, I never speak in any videos.
Second, and this is the real killer, I never do ‘product’ videos. I don’t showcase new modules or chase after news about them; I do patching videos as part of my mission is to simply help newcomers focus on what’s important.
I put in boring little diagrams to illustrate (as Strange did) the universality of modular concepts.
I try to create actual real musical examples that demonstrate the modular actually doing something sad banana and guess what, the more polished and complete the musical work is, the less anyone pays attention.
And of course, the number one way to ensure that no one watches your YouTube channel: make patching videos with old, dated, Eurorack modules!
Yup, if I traded it all in for some MU, Bookla, or Serge I’d be the prince of patching, but shake one old Doepfer or Livewire module in their faces and you might as well call yourself Fatty Arbuckle! This is fun! lolspew
So why do we do it?
Why put ourselves thru so much hassle for such a small audience?
Well, I actually do have a motivation, but only one of my subscribers has noticed. w00t
mgscheue
I love your videos, John and Dcramer. Maybe a relatively small audience, but very much appreciated. I just discovered Dinko Klubucar’s videos yesterday, too. I like his relaxed, building block approach.
JakoGreyshire
Good Luck voicedrifter

My favorite Youtubers have to be Pomplamoose Music..

Have you seen them? Making Video songs.. I was hooked, like 8 or 9 years ago..

I think Later on Jack Conte, from Pomplamoose, actually created Patreon!

If you have not seen them, well, here are some of my favorites..

P.S. I only like showing my modular in my videos... whatever.. seriously, i just don't get it

And you guys rock in your videos! Dcramer and JohnLRice, I always sit up straight and pay heed when you're around.. Thanks for being a part of this community!

P.P.S. Sorry for the video Bombs... Just got me thinking about youtubers and I thought people should know about Pomplamoose.. I can't believe time fly's so fast...



This video got a crazy ton of hits because they released it soon after Beyonce.. hihi

If you watch this one please watch it all the way through...It's funny the way she changes the lyrics..



Just really good music productions really..



This one is short and funny!! Good camera tricks too..



They got better over the years....







Jack Conte's stuff is super Rad! The end of this video is wicked!





voicedrifter
JakoGreyshire wrote:
My favorite Youtubers have to be Pomplamoose Music..

Solid content drop mate, yeah I've been fan of Pomplamoose since their very first video (or at least the original one that went super viral way back in the day). Jack Conte has gone on to do amazing things for the community, mad respect. Patreon is well on its way to being the ultimate platform for sustainable income for professional content creators if YouTube keeps going down the toilet.
ben_hex
Welcome voicedrifter and nice one on all the Ableton videos leading up to your break and now modular ventures too. Looking forward to your videos.
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