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WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

Finishing music
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Production Techniques  
Author Finishing music
senecio
I’m reading this book on my kindle: “making music: 74 creative strategies for electronic music producers” by Dennis DeSantis

(I think it was $9.99 on Amazon) I’m finding it really helpful! Tons of great advice on getting music projects finished.

I’m even gonna do this cheesy “make a record in February” website thing it mentions: http://fawm.org/fawmers/senecio/

Anything to save me from the dark ocean of procrastination and gear hunting.
whinger
I started by uploading weekly to Instagram. Then once I got comfortable with that, I took the best of those one minute songs, extend them to full length. The during some time off from work over the holidays, I released the ones that worked as an EP.

I find little goals that add to each other, to be the best way to trick me into doing productive work. So the one minute thing is pretty easy to do, then only the best get worked into full length, which is easy, because they're the ones that excite me. And so forth. You can eat the whole elephant, you just do it one bite at a time.
soundshaper
Finishing music really is all about hard work and dedication. However you also have to have a method and a plan. Here’s the method my partner and I use.

1. Program sounds and make patterns with my gear during non-writing time like late at night or when I have a need to get nerdy

2. Jam all day using our sounds, recording things here and there that we liked, doesn’t have it be perfect or anything

3. Sit together for a day or two and slice and cut and arrange and record little bits to make a crude and terrible sounding arrangement from the jams

4. Add some more tracks and replace some of the jam parts with new crude recordings that are improvements on the originals and hone in on an arrangement

*Note: Still no mixing or fine tuning or perfecting a loop, as these things will stop you from getting the arrangement done which is essential to making an entire song. You have to “imagine” it sounding good for quite a bit of the process.

5. Now start replacing the scratch tracks with better recordings, really dialing in the programs, tones and some effects so the performance really comes through. We’ll spend at least a whole day doing this for each instrument/track.

6. Fine tuning and replacement of anything that didn’t quite work.

7. Mix

Yay, another song is done! Now, and only now, onto the next. It's peanut butter jelly time!

Hope this helps.
Dcramer
I find that to get something bigger, like an album done, it helps if I envision a theme, sound, and set of techniques for the project. By setting some musical limits and thematic structure, I find it easier to start filling in the spaces w00t
lisa
soundshaper That sounds dedicated and time consuming. eek! I skip step 1, 3, 4 and 5. Mr. Green

I make a drum loop as I wiggle some modular bass and melodies. I do a live recording of the separate tracks. I arrange, add effects and do a crude mix in the same go in my daw. Then I put (too many, awful) hours into making a final mix. Done.
eltrasgu
it looks like a never ending cycle. in my case I would be programing, then jamming and when I'm in the zone just press record. that's the only way I see... the tracks I do itb they all end in that kind of never ending process till I come with some impressive improvisation out of it. sometimes it has nothing to do with the original recording.
btw I think that a good producer should have personality, even more than technique, after all it's a matter of taste and quality is relative
slumberjack
lisa wrote:
soundshaper That sounds dedicated and time consuming. eek! I skip step 1, 3, 4 and 5. Mr. Green

I make a drum loop as I wiggle some modular bass and melodies. I do a live recording of the separate tracks. I arrange, add effects and do a crude mix in the same go in my daw. Then I put (too many, awful) hours into making a final mix. Done.


sounds familiar!

if i have a vision on the mix AND when the audio is already prepared enough like fx added already on the recording or post production is done.
if i 'have' to switch between eq-ing, re-amp and fx chains and mixing it's leading nowhere. and usually i mix the best when i invest a few days inna row 60 -90 min max each day until i i'm there where i want.
otherwise, yeah it's awful.
thevegasnerve
Dcramer wrote:
I find that to get something bigger, like an album done, it helps if I envision a theme, sound, and set of techniques for the project. By setting some musical limits and thematic structure, I find it easier to start filling in the spaces w00t


This is the approach I now embrace that includes selecting the instruments I am allowed to use. That usually gets tested at some point! And of course not allowing myself to move to the next project is a big part of that. Picking a theme would be a lot of fun too, haven tried that at least consciously.
slumberjack
thevegasnerve wrote:

not allowing myself to move to the next project is a big part of that


i run like 3.5 solo projects with different setting on mainly the same gear.
it's relaxing because i switch from one to another by intuition and i never get bored that way. for like almost half a year i haven't made a single bleep for the noise project and then last week i just recorded a song out of 'nothing' (by testing out a new module as i remember).
with various project in different themes you're able to go back and forth constantly and you mights learn skills that came only because a certain dedication to that certain theme / workflow / concept. skills you can use then in your other project / alias / aka.

don't be afraid of moving around projects.
working non-linear, more process oriented and not product related has freed up my mind more than anything else.
aokjoey0
My issue has been deciding that my stuff is worthy of public consumption, not completing anything. I finally pushed stuff out on SoundCloud and have a YouTube channel set up for publishing videos from my studio under my alter ego. Apogee Kick.

The comments suggesting limiting scope I can whole heartily concur with. It must work for Dcramer, listen to the quality and admire the quantity of his output!

Cheers,
soundshaper
slumberjack wrote:
thevegasnerve wrote:

not allowing myself to move to the next project is a big part of that


i run like 3.5 solo projects with different setting on mainly the same gear.
it's relaxing because i switch from one to another by intuition and i never get bored that way. for like almost half a year i haven't made a single bleep for the noise project and then last week i just recorded a song out of 'nothing' (by testing out a new module as i remember).
with various project in different themes you're able to go back and forth constantly and you mights learn skills that came only because a certain dedication to that certain theme / workflow / concept. skills you can use then in your other project / alias / aka.

don't be afraid of moving around projects.
working non-linear, more process oriented and not product related has freed up my mind more than anything else.


I use to be able to work like that when I was using software instruments and effects more often. I didn’t finish as much tho. Once I got back with my good friend and music counterpart we did all live take recording and mixing all analog. That was tedious but fun, yet impossible to move on until finished. Too many knobs!

Ironically, we have of late been experimenting with iOS and Ableton to write some more progressive songs for live performance. And the whole point of that I guess is to be able to skip around and play any of the songs at anytime.
thevegasnerve
slumberjack wrote:
thevegasnerve wrote:

not allowing myself to move to the next project is a big part of that


i run like 3.5 solo projects with different setting on mainly the same gear.
it's relaxing because i switch from one to another by intuition and i never get bored that way. for like almost half a year i haven't made a single bleep for the noise project and then last week i just recorded a song out of 'nothing' (by testing out a new module as i remember).
with various project in different themes you're able to go back and forth constantly and you mights learn skills that came only because a certain dedication to that certain theme / workflow / concept. skills you can use then in your other project / alias / aka.

don't be afraid of moving around projects.
working non-linear, more process oriented and not product related has freed up my mind more than anything else.


I think that a non-linear workflow can be very productive for many. It’s all dependent on how you are wired. I have learned that a very rigid Socratic Method instills discipline to my mind and challenges it with its constraints. I find it actually calms me down. There is still plenty of room for creative processes during the composition process.
slumberjack
thevegasnerve wrote:
slumberjack wrote:
thevegasnerve wrote:

not allowing myself to move to the next project is a big part of that


i run like 3.5 solo projects with different setting on mainly the same gear.
it's relaxing because i switch from one to another by intuition and i never get bored that way. for like almost half a year i haven't made a single bleep for the noise project and then last week i just recorded a song out of 'nothing' (by testing out a new module as i remember).
with various project in different themes you're able to go back and forth constantly and you mights learn skills that came only because a certain dedication to that certain theme / workflow / concept. skills you can use then in your other project / alias / aka.

don't be afraid of moving around projects.
working non-linear, more process oriented and not product related has freed up my mind more than anything else.


I think that a non-linear workflow can be very productive for many. It’s all dependent on how you are wired. I have learned that a very rigid Socratic Method instills discipline to my mind and challenges it with its constraints. I find it actually calms me down. There is still plenty of room for creative processes during the composition process.


sure. it's not only the easy way, there are doubts all the time if i should worj on one project only. but actually as you say about your workflow: it's the only way possible (at the moment). wink
slumberjack
soundshaper wrote:
slumberjack wrote:
thevegasnerve wrote:

not allowing myself to move to the next project is a big part of that


i run like 3.5 solo projects with different setting on mainly the same gear.
it's relaxing because i switch from one to another by intuition and i never get bored that way. for like almost half a year i haven't made a single bleep for the noise project and then last week i just recorded a song out of 'nothing' (by testing out a new module as i remember).
with various project in different themes you're able to go back and forth constantly and you mights learn skills that came only because a certain dedication to that certain theme / workflow / concept. skills you can use then in your other project / alias / aka.

don't be afraid of moving around projects.
working non-linear, more process oriented and not product related has freed up my mind more than anything else.


I use to be able to work like that when I was using software instruments and effects more often. I didn’t finish as much tho. Once I got back with my good friend and music counterpart we did all live take recording and mixing all analog. That was tedious but fun, yet impossible to move on until finished. Too many knobs!

Ironically, we have of late been experimenting with iOS and Ableton to write some more progressive songs for live performance. And the whole point of that I guess is to be able to skip around and play any of the songs at anytime.


i work on a desk too and with volatile memory for some of the devices.
so i bring an idea to a point where i have to record, and then a lot of
things are already pretty set as i i don't like to much working on the screen and overdubs are work intensive so i try to choose them carefully.
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