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What spectrum analysis software to use?
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Music Tech DIY  
Author What spectrum analysis software to use?
Waz
Does anyone here use spectrum analysis software? I want to visualize compression and EQ curves at home. I know of Spectra Plus, but I was wondering if anyone knew of something in a similar (or hopefully less) price range?
ashleym
If you are thinking of software, you have a computer. If you have computer you might have a DAW. In that you can have endless VST plug ins to do this.

If not, how do you want to use the software: with a microphone? analysing hardware (this is the DIY section!)? etc
slow_riot
http://www.audiotester.de/
Waz
ashleym wrote:
If you are thinking of software, you have a computer. If you have computer you might have a DAW. In that you can have endless VST plug ins to do this.

If not, how do you want to use the software: with a microphone? analysing hardware (this is the DIY section!)? etc



This is for testing DIY Euro filters I've put on a breadboard. Plugins tend not to be very accurate without reference signals. It seems like Spectra Plus is one of the only ones that allow you to use an audio interface instead of a proprietary interface that costs 1000s.
guest
ive used this one before:
http://www.qsl.net/dl4yhf/spectra1.html

its a little complicated, but seemed to work fine.
Graham Hinton
Waz wrote:
Does anyone here use spectrum analysis software? I want to visualize compression and EQ curves at home. I know of Spectra Plus, but I was wondering if anyone knew of something in a similar (or hopefully less) price range?


You get what you pay for... sometimes. Most software like this is FFT based signal analysis rather than true spectrum analysis, you need the latter for measuring compressor and equalizer responses.

Quote:
It seems like Spectra Plus is one of the only ones that allow you to use an audio interface instead of a proprietary interface that costs 1000s.


There is a reason for that. Most computer soundcards are not very good at measuring a 30kHz signal at -90dBu.
There are also the general problems with all computer apps: they lack the means of being properly calibrated and they get orphaned. You would be better off finding a secondhand hardware analyser.

You could look at FuzzMeasure on the Mac from SuperMegaUltraGroovy, Inc., but I didn't buy it after talking to their technical support (or rather lack thereof).
Kickflip
Funnily enough, I released a plugin for spectral and waveform comparison at the end of last year. It's on v1.01 at the moment, but v1.05 is coming very soon, and I'm also very open to feature requests because I want it to be useful for all sorts of areas of the industry. There's an easy option there to visualise only channel instead of 2 for when that's more what's required.

http://www.bogus-noise.co.uk/compere/
slow_riot
Graham Hinton wrote:

There is a reason for that. Most computer soundcards are not very good at measuring a 30kHz signal at -90dBu.
There are also the general problems with all computer apps: they lack the means of being properly calibrated and they get orphaned. You would be better off finding a secondhand hardware analyser.


My 1980s DSA bit the dust recently, despite all best efforts otherwise. Keeping those old machines in service takes a lot of resources which I personally just don't have. I would recommend anyone who gets a machine like that gets a popular model for (relative) ease of service.

In respect to A/D conversion, Wayne Kirkwood over at proaudioforum mentioned using an evaluation board for a 192Khz 24bit A/D converter, documented here:

http://www.proaudiodesignforum.com/forum/php/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=886

Another option is to seek out local DIY spaces (often called hackspaces). In many cities there are excellent community facilities, a member of the space in my last city had a recent model Audio Precision.
thegrinch
I really like Fuzzmeasure for it's simplicity.

I just have a basic Scarlett 2i2 interface and it was easy to set up a sine sweep that I can run through analog gear to get frequency response and thd info. It is a little limited in terms of how in-depth you can make your analysis, but it works great to get a general picture of whats going on.

http://supermegaultragroovy.com/products/fuzzmeasure/
Revok
http://www.faberacoustical.com/apps/mac/electroacoustics_toolbox/

I've used this a few times. Most of it is over my head but it had a lot of useful tools.
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