MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index
 FAQ & Terms of UseFAQ & Terms Of Use   Wiggler RadioMW Radio   Muff Wiggler TwitterTwitter   Support the site @ PatreonPatreon 
 SearchSearch   RegisterSign up   Log inLog in 
WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

Sidechaining
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Production Techniques  
Author Sidechaining
rishin
Hey all,

I'm new to the whole mixing shindig, and I recently learned about side-chain compression. It seems like a really effective resource in letting all your sonic elements breath a little. I was wondering if 'side-chaining' is used in settings other than compression. Like do traditional DAW's allow the advent of some audio signal to trigger EQ, reverb, or any other processor aside from a compressor, on some other track? Could we even get more complex and have say a key change of some melodic element on one track trigger a processing unit on another track?

Thanks in advance,
Funky40
rishin wrote:
Like do traditional DAW's allow the advent of some audio signal to trigger EQ, reverb, or any other processor aside from a compressor, on some other track?

One possible key here would be to have a Envelope follower VST (or M4L device in case you are working with Live+MaxforLive) or a Reaktor patch for reaktor or ?
you´d extract with those a modulation envelope based on the amplitude of your signal. then map it as a controller to your desired destination.
anything other than envelope followers in regards to the OPs query ?
voicedrifter
Yep, what he said ^^^^

Envelope followers. Sky's the limit, get jiggy with it.
PhineasFreak
try inverse sidechaining gates - you can do stuff like remove beats etc!
maaaks
That kind of use case is where Bitwig really shines IMHO. Most if not all DAWs have some kind of side-chain ability built in, but Bitwig is super flexible about what you can modulate with the generated control signal.
ddyenn59
PhineasFreak wrote:
try inverse sidechaining gates - you can do stuff like remove beats etc!


this is much more interesting to me than sidechain compression, which, too often, is used as a shortcut to loudness and usually ends up in flat sounding mixes

sidechaining filter, eq, oor w m4l, pretty much anything -- all more interesting than sidechaining compression
Michael O.
The sidechain input on a compressor can be used to achieve a lot of useful effects aside from the gimmicky ducking thing. Using a narrowly eq’d sidechain input can allow you to de-ess a signal (obviously can be applied to vox, but can also be interesting on stuff like hihats), or to de-emphasize particular frequency ranges in general.

When using buss compression it can be useful to put a hpf in the sidechain. This stops the compressor from clamping down on the errant bass frequencies, keeping things more dynamic and transparent, and, for lack of a better description, can sound bigger.

Given all the utility and special efx uses I always like to keep a couple compressors’ sidechain inputs available on the patchbay.
Funky40
what i wonder:
are different compressors behaving different in regards to sidechaining-----> ducking other signals ?
...speaking of BD ducking the Bass in techno-ish music

(speaking about software right now)
i´ve donne that the first time the other day,
and my comp of choice for creative uses ( zip) was suprisingly much less wining on that use as i would have imagined.

I couldn´t get my settings so that the gain of the sidechain signal and my threshold/ratio settings were matching and were musically fruitful in any way
Are there tricks to apply to get a better control of the dynamic level of the sidechain signal, other than EQ ?
Michael O.
Funky40 wrote:
what i wonder:
are different compressors behaving different in regards to sidechaining-----> ducking other signals ?
...speaking of BD ducking the Bass in techno-ish music


Each type of compressor will have an inherently different response (e.g., vca is different than fet, fet is different than t4b, etc.) to the same sidechain material, whether they have external sidechain input or not. They even respond differently among the same basic type (e.g., dbx 160 is different than ssl, api, 3630, etc.). Some units can even switch between average/rms and peak detection, like the UREI la12/22 (which has some of the most comprehensive and useful sidechain functionality, imo).

So in short, yes, there is a very wide variation in response, even given ostensibly similar settings.
widdly
Some multiband compressor have separate side-chain inputs for each frequency band. You can then do all sorts of frequency specific effects and tricks. The sources for the side chains need not be added to mix and can therefore be entirely arbitrary and tailored for the desired effects.
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Production Techniques  
Page 1 of 1
Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group