MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index
 FAQ & Terms of UseFAQ & Terms Of Use   Wiggler RadioMW Radio   Muff Wiggler TwitterTwitter   Support the site @ PatreonPatreon 
 SearchSearch   RegisterSign up   Log inLog in 
WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

Steevio-style Eurorack Modular Live Techno System
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Eurorack Modules Goto page 1, 2  Next [all]
Author Steevio-style Eurorack Modular Live Techno System
tedcri
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dAIYYuRNx7M&t=616s

In this Mylar melodies Youtube video he uses 2 sequencers and 2 precision adders. The output of both goes into the same quantizer.

I don't understand the need or benefit of two adders. Can someone please explain It's driving me mad;P

This is how they are connected: https://www.modulargrid.net/e/patches/view/33924
Futuresound
That Addac207 is actually 4 quantizers in 1, so each precision adder is going to it's own quantizer.

And having two adders allows for each voice to be transposed up or down independently, or for one of the sequencers to be removed entirely from one voice if desired.
winterhater
it looks interesting for transposing one sequence by another, I dont understand why that small system has 2
mateo
Set up that way, it means each oscillator can be controlled by either sequencer or the sum of both: the toggles on each adder makes it easy to switch it up on the fly.
TemplarK
Looks like it serves two functions, one so he can switch between sequences, because the adder is also an on/off switch, also he can use more octaves, add them together, subtract them and add two seperate offsets, all of this will give him tons of different sequences he can recall by flicking switches.

Its pretty genius actually.

So over the set he can eventually take the sequence from a bass and take it up and up by fifths and 7ths and then octaves then octave + fifth and on and on

all while having some variation in the sequecnes by adding the different CV's together. Its actially a killer little idea damn i'm going to have to try that out!

I "think" this is whats happening anyway maybe Mylar himself will drop in and tell us "everything" thats happening there!

edit - Heres where the concept comes from so watch this its where Mylar got those ideas. Also as already pointed out the quantiser is a one in 4 so its two seperate sequences i think but watching steevio he seesm to be using them in a even crazier way. Really interesting stuff actually that Steevio track sounds awesome i have to admit!


manicstarseed
Templar pretty well nailed it.
I am pretty new to this (first post), and am only 4 months into modular. I based my rig on Mylar's implementation. I love the steer-ablity of the concept.
I too am interested in 100% live jams. I am using an O_C and it's ability to auto-generate melodies frees up the 8-step sequencers for other tasks. One can drive (4) quantized CVs with as many triggers and inputs available, r=the minimum is one trigger.

Precision adders are great. The can attenuate boost and invert in 1V increments - there are a myriad of uses, besides pitch.
Catflap
I have been using a steevio style sequencing set up for a while now.
I´m finding that when using multiple precision adders it makes more sense to view them in the same way that you use the switched multiples.

Both are used to route either CV or triggers/gates to the rest of the system.

If you limit yourself to 1 Precision Adder you only really have 1 + cv to send to 3 different inputs simultaniously and 1 - cv to send to an additional single input

Add a second Precision Adder to the mix and increase both the routing and melody creating options.

Having 4 is proving really versitile for me.

If you are using them for versitile routing I recommend quantizing the CVs before they hit the Precision adders.
alanza
IMO, the secret sauce to the Steevio song—and the thing that makes using this system hard for someone interested in improvising a more in-genre sound—really is the thing he squeezes in right at the end: each oscillator is tuned to a different note of the chord he's interested in exploring, so the reason the piece really hits the ground running is that most of the oscillators are really only there to play their harmonic, which means that all of the craziness he's got going on is to route gates rather than pitch CV.

Beyond that, I think the reason the piece works so well and that he has enough to fill a whole set with it is because even if he doesn't touch anything, because he's working with prime numbers, the different lengths of sequencers and switches will phase and provide some extra interest.

Some problems that might arise from a techno or electro point of view with this setup is you often really want to use changes in key/melody, timbre or drum pattern to articulate a set into 'sections'. Because the oscillators are tuned to different notes, changing key is more of a headache. Steevio can change the melody or the octave, of course, but the same note has to be the root throughout the piece. Timbre changes are similarly doable, but again, to me it seems like it would be hard in this configuration to change an oscillator's role in the piece. Lastly, the reason the prime numbers so well is that the drums are mixed in with the pitched oscillators—a trigger is a trigger is a trigger, and that's how Steevio's using them. Makes for an incredibly organic sound, but then it's a lot harder to go "okay we should switch to just kick and hi hat for a breakdown feel"

I could be way off-base, of course, but I guess the above is a long way of saying it's worth remembering that the Steevio patch is a "piece" not a "groovebox." Dead Banana
pmarchitect
I don't see the point in a precision adder for melody changing. You're just going to bounce up and down several octaves no?
Ypsi Kid
pmarchitect wrote:
I don't see the point in a precision adder for melody changing. You're just going to bounce up and down several octaves no?


I think the power here is when you add sequences together to get something new and interesting. At least that's what I'm finding. I'm just slowly going into my journey of a similar rig and have been surprised at what I can get from 2 sequences and the precision adder! Just picked up another precision adder as well given what I've found with some experimenting.

Fun stuff and a absolute genius way of setting it up. Some limitation sure, but lots of fun and interesting ways you can take this.
vapili
Hey guys, this is my first post here - I was scanning the forum silently for the past 1.5 years.

So Steevio's system demo had a huge impact on me and I recently watched it again in detail.

Out of curiosity (and for the sake of completeness) I recreated Steevio's system from the video. I thought it might be interesting for some of you.

Top Left 9U
Bottom Left 9U
Top Right 9U
Bottom Right 9U
cptnal
Interesting. And welcome. Guinness ftw!

I've made those links a bit prettier... thumbs up

https://www.modulargrid.net/e/racks/view/680925
https://www.modulargrid.net/e/racks/view/680935
https://www.modulargrid.net/e/racks/view/680950
https://www.modulargrid.net/e/racks/view/680952

Edit: You beat me to it. Mr. Green
Ypsi Kid
Here's a quick video of me testing out a similar approach. I can now see why attenuators are key, but also see the immense power of this approach. Super fun and so many ways you can take it. Had no idea how powerful simple switches/routers were, this really highlights their power. This was a fun little jam (don't mind the crappy attempt at visuals, my camera was giving me a hard time, so just recorded this into my DAW and added the visuals - I'm no VJ, haha)!

CaneMan
Damn. I've been hearing a lot about Steevio lately but not quite connecting. Something about this thread is really reaching me. Are there any other threads that do a good job explaining Steevio's approach to patch design?
R.U.Nuts
pmarchitect wrote:
I don't see the point in a precision adder for melody changing. You're just going to bounce up and down several octaves no?

The doepfer A-185-2 can add any signal at its four inputs not only the 1V that is normalized to it's inputs. So with a quantizer after the adder you can turn any mix of signal into 1V/oct sequences. I have the impression that this module is pretty much the most misunderstood and underrated module ever. -Which is sad because it's actually pure awesomeness.
Ypsi Kid
CaneMan wrote:
Damn. I've been hearing a lot about Steevio lately but not quite connecting. Something about this thread is really reaching me. Are there any other threads that do a good job explaining Steevio's approach to patch design?


Some interesting reading around his technique, just search for Steevio posts. One that really had my head turned, is the below. Really interesting (and powerful) approach.

https://www.muffwiggler.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=2407439&highlight=#2 407439
vapili
CaneMan wrote:
Damn. I've been hearing a lot about Steevio lately but not quite connecting. Something about this thread is really reaching me. Are there any other threads that do a good job explaining Steevio's approach to patch design?


There is a nice interview which goes quite deep and gives a nice overview ond steevio's concept.

https://www.xlr8r.com/.amp/features/a-guide-to-modular-synthesis

it's worth reading into the 2nd half of this rather long article.
Ypsi Kid
This thread is also really good about covering his concept/technique. The uncoupling of gates/triggers and CV was the big piece for me. Took me a while to wrap my head around it, still doing so, but it's this thinking that leads to a wealth of ideas in terms of application.

Cool stuff, had a another jam last night and had an absolute blast!
Prunesquallor
Ypsi Kid wrote:
The uncoupling of gates/triggers and CV was the big piece for me. Took me a while to wrap my head around it!


Yup, I'm still not getting it. hihi Do you mind expanding on this?
kwaidan
If you take the pitch CV from a sequencer and send it to a VCO, it will spit out a melody or bassline. If you then use a different gate pattern to chop up the melody or bass line differently, you can dramatically change it, especially rhythmically.

If you take the output of a VCO and mult it, you can process each audio signal differently through gating, and create several different voices.

When I had a Sputnik multi-tap delay, I would send a chord stab from a Shapeshifter, and send it to the multi-tap. I would then take two or three different delayed outputs and gate each one differently. With some creative fitlering, it shounded like several different instruments were playing.
R.U.Nuts
kwaidan wrote:
If you take the pitch CV from a sequencer and send it to a VCO, it will spit out a melody or bassline. If you then use a different gate pattern to chop up the melody or bass line differently, you can dramatically change it, especially rhythmically.

If you take the output of a VCO and mult it, you can process each audio signal differently through gating, and create several different voices.

When I had a Sputnik multi-tap delay, I would send a chord stab from a Shapeshifter, and send it to the multi-tap. I would then take two or three different delayed outputs and gate each one differently. With some creative fitlering, it shounded like several different instruments were playing.


Good idea with the multi tap!
I built myself an OR-combiner with three channels and mute switches for each channel. It sits right next to my A-185-2 precision adder. The triggers going into the combiner are those from the different sequences whose CVs are plugged into the precision adder. This way I can choose any combination of three CV sequences and apply different mixes of trigger patterns derived from them.
Instead of multing a single output of a VCO I use the different waveform outputs of a single analog VCO. So I maybe route the sine into a wavefolder, plug the triangle together with another VCO into a ring mod, plug the saw into a VCF and the square into the audio input of Rings. If you now apply different trigger sequences to the various VCAs or VCFs where the different waveforms go to you can get a faux multitimbral riff from a single VCOs outputs.
Prunesquallor
kwaidan wrote:
If you take the pitch CV from a sequencer and send it to a VCO, it will spit out a melody or bassline. If you then use a different gate pattern to chop up the melody or bass line differently, you can dramatically change it, especially rhythmically.

If you take the output of a VCO and mult it, you can process each audio signal differently through gating, and create several different voices.

When I had a Sputnik multi-tap delay, I would send a chord stab from a Shapeshifter, and send it to the multi-tap. I would then take two or three different delayed outputs and gate each one differently. With some creative fitlering, it shounded like several different instruments were playing.


Gotcha. Thanks! thumbs up
vapili
Is there anyone who can tell me more about Steevio's technique on groove and swing? Or how you guys integrate similar dynamics into your music?

Obviously, for Steevio the A162 trig delays play a huge role (ref: "Modular swing?"-Thread). But I can't really wrap my head around it..

I recently got one A162 and modified the caps to get simple swings (I sometimes feed a delays sync input - which is neat) - but it is obvious that there is a lot more behind Steevio's groove.

Maybe, I don't really get the basic concepts behind moving my trigs around?
Thank's for your inputs!
void23
vapili wrote:
Is there anyone who can tell me more about Steevio's technique on groove and swing? Or how you guys integrate similar dynamics into your music?

Obviously, for Steevio the A162 trig delays play a huge role (ref: "Modular swing?"-Thread). But I can't really wrap my head around it..

I recently got one A162 and modified the caps to get simple swings (I sometimes feed a delays sync input - which is neat) - but it is obvious that there is a lot more behind Steevio's groove.

Maybe, I don't really get the basic concepts behind moving my trigs around?
Thank's for your inputs!


I personally don't see how you could do swing with just the A-162. With Maths, it's pretty easy. You modulate the trigger / gate delay with a sync'd LFO to bring in just the right amount of offset on the upbeats.

No sure how Steevio does accents though. For me, I like Doepfer filters, or filters with two CV inputs that modulate cutoff. After that, it's pretty self explanitory.
ZenitSar
I'm selling a Precision Adder on Ebay and this is what I wrote about it:

Use it for CV!
Use it for Gates!

Example: It has four input jacks, so plug in:
1) a CV out from a keyboard
2) a CV out from a sequencer
3) a CV out from a different sequencer
4) use the last input like an octave selector (to add or subtract one octave)
5) out 1 to CV in on a synth, voice, or oscillator
6) use the other outs to play other synths, voices, or oscillators

You can then use your keyboard to play the notes on your controlled devices, as well as turn on or off sequences, with a three octave range. You can have everything going at once, or mix and match.

I have kept one Adder, because I only have room for one, but two or more is a great thing if you've got the voices and/or sequencers.
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Eurorack Modules Goto page 1, 2  Next [all]
Page 1 of 2
Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group