MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index
 FAQ & Terms of UseFAQ & Terms Of Use   Wiggler RadioMW Radio   Muff Wiggler TwitterTwitter   Support the site @ PatreonPatreon 
 SearchSearch   RegisterSign up   Log inLog in 
WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

Will I always feel behind?
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Modular Synth General Discussion Goto page 1, 2  Next [all]
Author Will I always feel behind?
JoshuaTSP
The modular world moves so quickly!

Will I ever feel like I've caught up?
I can't keep up!

hmmm.....
wavecircle
What exactly are you trying to keep up with?
Grumble
There's only one way to keep up: design and build yourself
gimber
Are you running a showroom or building an instrument?
JoshuaTSP
wavecircle wrote:
What exactly are you trying to keep up with?


Modules and technique.

I'm fairly new to all of this....so that's probably some of the reason I feel overwhelmed.

There are so many existing modules to research and learn about......it also feels like new modules are released every day. Some seem so complicated that I'd never understand them or how to use them. Moves so fast.

It would be nice to get to a point where I could research a module and get an understanding of how it functions. Currently it's like trying to read a wall of ancient hieroglyphics when I look at some modules.
JoshuaTSP
gimber wrote:
Are you running a showroom or building an instrument?


building. d'oh! I get it.
lisa
You don’t have to keep up. Get fun modules and use them, then repeat. If you never catch up, the fun will be forever! thumbs up
gimber
JoshuaTSP wrote:
gimber wrote:
Are you running a showroom or building an instrument?


building. d'oh! I get it.


If you're getting started, all the new modules coming out works to your advantage: there are loads of older modules getting sold off for cheap, and are just as valid musically.
Futuresound
At some point, your focus will switch from modules to process or writing. It takes a while, but you'll get to a point where you can see most modules are just variations on functions you already have or can patch. Not that there aren't cool new modules, but you will realize you don't need them all smile
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
Short answer: No.
wavecircle
Learn the essential functional blocks and how to actually make music with them. Eurorack Pokemon is a road to madness and little music is made if you are constantly re-evaluating your system.

Generators

Modifiers

Controllers

Learn them, they frequently overlap.
cptnal
Futuresound wrote:
At some point, your focus will switch from modules to process or writing.


I don't find the two mutually exclusive. A lot of my finished pieces arise out of experiments, and many of those start with an idea I picked up here. we're not worthy

Always embrace your inner noob! This is fun!
pugix
JoshuaTSP wrote:
wavecircle wrote:
What exactly are you trying to keep up with?


Modules and technique.

I'm fairly new to all of this....so that's probably some of the reason I feel overwhelmed.


You'll never keep up with modules, but you don't need to. Technique is another matter. New techniques don't emerge that quickly. Start with classic electronic music tutorials to get the basics. Then you might study techniques in specific areas of music you want to do in more detail. The modules just support the techniques. You need to learn some techniques first to know what modules you'll need. The basic set of modules hasn't changed in forty years, east or west 'coast'. Over time you'll probably try and discard a lot of modules, but you'll often use the same techniques again and again.

Try inventing a technique and post about it. You'll likely get a slew of responses telling you how it's related to prior art. Invent a good new module and if everyone loves it, it's probably because it supports classic techniques in some innovative way.
tony d
I remember feeling like this when i started 10 years ago, but now i rarely buy anything new and when i get excited about all the new stuff i often realize i can patch up something similar with what i already have. Don't sweat it, just have fun with what you have and realize that as long as you keep checking out music gear and visiting places like Muffs you will constantly want the new cool shit.
oneunkind
cool, nvm...
BenignToxicity
I think it's more difficult, and a little more overwhelming, when you're building a system and not 100% sure of what your gaps are when it comes to achieving your goals. Like most others, I have a wish-list of slightly exotic and rather expensive modules (I know, that's a relative term)... but I've learned to suppress the, "oooh... look, shiny!" knee-jerk and concentrate on playing... and letting that process tell me what I need.

For example, it became abundantly apparent that I was woefully short on all things clocking. Pamela to the rescue! Not a sexy sound-generating module... but a solid utility that has since become the beating heart of my system and allowed me to accomplish some musical goals (so much so that I bought the expander). Another example is Braids. I bought it ahead of the Plaits announcement and love it. Is Plaits better/cheaper? Probably, but I have Braids and will not be distracted... and I specifically avoided all the on-line gushing about Plaits because of that. It's on the wish-list... but quite a way down. As you say, new modules appear with alarming regularity and sometimes they just scream you name. After seeing the on-line videos, I just had to buy the 2hp Pluck... but I know it will slot into myself system nicely because I really like Braids' Pluk voice, and the 2hp does that... but better.

I guess it's all about working out what you want to accomplish and sussing out what you need to get there. That being said, I'm waiting on confirmation of a gig that will give me an unexpected windfall... that'll be Morphagene and Magneto straight off the wish-list smile
DonKartofflo
Just buy 6U doepfer and be done with it.
Get a couple fancy modules to complement the lot, maybe some more complex sequencing and i guarantee you can make crazy ass novel music.
Oldstench
gimber wrote:

If you're getting started, all the new modules coming out works to your advantage: there are loads of older modules getting sold off for cheap, and are just as valid musically.


This guy knows what's up. We are in the golden age - no fuck that, the diamond age - of synths. New people are cycling in and out of the hobby at a ridiculous rate. Many of them buy tons of shit, realize they have no idea what they want or have to pay rent/eat and sell it all at 80% of new after owning and barely touching then for 4 months.

Additionally, there's a huge cult-of-the-new mentality (esp in euro) where a mk2 comes out and instantly obviates the mk1 to some people. Buy those mk1's. They're awesome too and don't suddenly stop working.

Use this to your advantage.
dooj88
EuroFoMo, eh? just have fun with it.. poke around modulargrid, pick something you think looks like it would bring some badass functionality to your system and watch youtube videos on it. then you can use your new knowledge to research similar modules and you'll learn even more looking at variations on those ideas..

before i had a good grasp on what was gong on, i used to daydream about patching with a new module and try to work out how it would change my existing processes/techniques/sound approaches. Cheesy!
luchog
gimber wrote:
If you're getting started, all the new modules coming out works to your advantage: there are loads of older modules getting sold off for cheap, and are just as valid musically.


The more I build my synth, and the more I look at and fiddle with the latest-and-greatest in the local synth shop, the more invested I become in the idea of using simple, basic function modules instead of the monster-popular shiny new 99+ function modules. I might move into the more complex stuff one day when I have a stronger grasp of technique, but for the moment, I'm happy with what I'm building. There are one or two exceptions (SSF URA, RA Natural Gate), but for the most part, I'm sticking with the basics for the foreseeable future. And there are a lot of basic modules out there for a whole lot cheaper, new or used, than the "oo shiny" stuff.
dkcg
As long as there are manufacturers in business, you will never "catch up". The second you think you caught all the Pokemon, there will be Mk2, and Mk3, and possibly Classic and Pro versions, and of course Mk2Pro, Mk3Pro, etc.

Unless you go to a format that moves much slower.

My Buchla has pretty much stayed exactly the same for the last few years. When I had euro, it grew at a steady rate. Luckily, I got out of euro before the Mk2 frenzies began.
Rex Coil 7
"Catching up" is a losing game. It's what many manufacturers of many things in many interests and hobbies count on .... the need to "keep up with the Jetsons" and be at the front of the line when it comes to owning the newest bestest stuffage.

Why worry about "catching up" anyhow? It's not a race, there's nothing to gain by being "ahead" or being "caught up". All pursuing that will do is drain your bank account, needlessly. You really won't be missing anything if you don't buy the brand newest shiny object. Unless prestige is important to you, there's no need to catch up.

Stress not. Leave the gear ownership races to those that insist on showing off their most recent purchases to get attention and adoration.

Learn all you can about the system you have .... there are SO MANY people that have shitpiles of modules and dual 12U rack Euro systems that don't know 10% of what most of their modules are capable of. Think of what excellent music has been made over the decades with far less!

There are guys like Moot Booxle that get more out of a Minimoog than many people with five times more cash spent on rigs that require six power supplies do.

Lean towards creation rather than consumerism.

It's peanut butter jelly time!
GuyaGuy
Learning modular patching is essentially the same as learning a programming language to code. There's a lot of lingo, best practices, and functions to learn. But that's really just the basics. What you do creatively with the basics is what's important. And there are always people doing things completely differently both in approach and output, which means there are always new things to learn.
JohnLRice
wavecircle wrote:
Learn the essential functional blocks and how to actually make music with them. Eurorack Pokemon is a road to madness and little music is made if you are constantly re-evaluating your system.

Generators

Modifiers

Controllers

Learn them, they frequently overlap.
Agreed 100%! thumbs up
jkjelec
Sorry in advance for being a goofball, but there's just such a double meaning to the thread title. So my response is.."We can all hope. But there may come a time when you are older, where you are no longer interested in feeling behind." Lolhammer! (hides)
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Modular Synth General Discussion Goto page 1, 2  Next [all]
Page 1 of 2
Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group