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WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

"ever growing pulsating brain" peel sessions gear?
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Production Techniques  
Author "ever growing pulsating brain" peel sessions gear?
umma gumma
by the orb?

I am curious what equipment Cauty and Paterson used to create this live track?

anybody know?

thx
unrecordings
Probably three turntables and a couple of tape machines. Maybe an S950 or S1000 if it's a later session
umma gumma
thanks!!

it's funny, if they were using TT's I do not hear any vinyl playback clicks/pops etc

I managed to find this KLF gear list, somewhere out there on the net: so probably at least some of this was available to them

-----------------------
The KLF's equipment list (Trancentral)

Akai S900
Atari ST Computer (with either Notator or Creator)
Gibson S-330 Semi-Acoustic guitar
Greengate DS-3 Sampler
Korg M1
Oberheim OB-8
Roland TR-808
Sci Prophet-5
DAT Machines, Technics SL Turntables and a large record collection.
----------------------

there is a KLF studio vid with a 909 & some other shots of studio gear too

I'd bet the samplers, DAT's, OB8 and drum machine were used in the Orb session. I believe it was Dec 1989 when they did that particular track.
thetwlo
umma gumma wrote:
thanks!!

it's funny, if they were using TT's I do not hear any vinyl playback clicks/pops etc


why would you? I doubt they were using scratched up 78's.
umma gumma
well, even new vinyl has some surface noise occasionally

and the stuff they were scrounging the bins for back in the day would have been used vinyl, I assume
jonne74
I read an interview with Patterson in mid 90's and he said they had access to a lot of fun gear "like the Prophet 5" during the making of Ultraworld.
umma gumma
thanks Jonne!
dubonaire
Fairly certain the lovely arpeggiated synth line is an OB-8.
umma gumma
that makes sense!

thx for the input
dubonaire
You're welcome - such a great tune!
umma gumma
agree.....especially considering it was done live

I also am blown away that "chill out" by the KLF was done live as well

it says so on the liner notes, but I always assumed it was done piecemeal/multitracked in a studio. and the liner notes were just embellishment/propaganda: " live at the SSL, yo!!"

rather than a single take ( although apparently they did a couple runs at it )

both quite impressive: music that has stood the test of timo IMO
dubonaire
umma gumma wrote:
agree.....especially considering it was done live

I also am blown away that "chill out" by the KLF was done live as well

it says so on the liner notes, but I always assumed it was done piecemeal/multitracked in a studio. and the liner notes were just embellishment/propaganda: " live at the SSL, yo!!"

rather than a single take ( although apparently they did a couple runs at it )

both quite impressive: music that has stood the test of timo IMO


They probably used a sampler in John Peel's studio rather than carted the synth in. Around this time a lot of this style was done live with possibly samplers, definitely DATs and vinyl. You can imagine that people would play like this for hours and hours at parties etc, so they are quite skilled at it. They were really DJs first.
gruebleengourd
dubonaire wrote:
They were really DJs first.


This IMO is a big reason for the shifts in musical styles that began when the DAW age arrived.

Before if you liked electronic dance music, the most accessible way to get into it heavily was by DJing. Often/usually that would be the initial step on the way to becoming someone who made electronic music.

Certainly not everyone followed that path, people could buy a synth and a sampler (or just a sampler and get going), and many people transitioned from bands / other home recording, but it was far more common in the past for someone who made dance genre music to start with djing.

With the DAW suddenly, there was a direct path of going straight into being a "producer." And the path of the DJ->producer these days is much less of a journey considering the availability of controllers+serrato or traktor.

How does this influence things? Less sense or sensitivity to what works/entertains/moves a large audience (not just appealing to specialist listeners). Less DJ friendly track structure and simultaneously less free flowing musical organization.
dubonaire
gruebleengourd wrote:
dubonaire wrote:
They were really DJs first.


This IMO is a big reason for the shifts in musical styles that began when the DAW age arrived.

Before if you liked electronic dance music, the most accessible way to get into it heavily was by DJing. Often/usually that would be the initial step on the way to becoming someone who made electronic music.

Certainly not everyone followed that path, people could buy a synth and a sampler (or just a sampler and get going), and many people transitioned from bands / other home recording, but it was far more common in the past for someone who made dance genre music to start with djing.

With the DAW suddenly, there was a direct path of going straight into being a "producer." And the path of the DJ->producer these days is much less of a journey considering the availability of controllers+serrato or traktor.

How does this influence things? Less sense or sensitivity to what works/entertains/moves a large audience (not just appealing to specialist listeners). Less DJ friendly track structure and simultaneously less free flowing musical organization.


I agree. Certainly true for many it seems.
umma gumma
yeah interesting perspectives; and good point about pre-DAW

I'm coming at this stuff from playing a musical instrument: been trying to wrap my head around a lot of DJ techniques, I guess

thx again
dubonaire
umma gumma wrote:
yeah interesting perspectives; and good point about pre-DAW

I'm coming at this stuff from playing a musical instrument: been trying to wrap my head around a lot of DJ techniques, I guess

thx again


I used to play a lot of ambient or eclectic sets with spoken word samples (from vinyl) often in a hauntological vein. It's not all that hard and a lot of fun. Actually I still do. It's easy to have happy accidents, where a spoken word over the outro of one tune, and then the intro of a new tune, can give the impression of some kind of gifted intentionality when it is purely accidental. And if you remember that from one set you might use it again.

So I used to crate dig for hauntologically interesting spoken word vinyl. I've got a lot of spoken word: William Burroughs, Lee Scratch Perry, odd comedies, children talking, 70s prose, instructional records etc. And some labels put out spoken word compilations deliberately for this purpose. Now it is super easy because you can pretty much find samples of everything online and play them digitally.

The ponderous trippy words of Ricky Lee Jones "little fluffy clouds" would have been like discovering gold. Leslie Nielsens' Board of Canada voice over samples on BOC's Geodaddi are possibly that album's secret sauce.

Also, it's not super hard to find beats that work over beatless pieces, and again often you can make happy accidents.

And, there is this thing that happens, which is my real pleasure in DJing, where you are playing one piece of music and you just hear in your mind what should come next, and then you get that out and mix it in and it works.

I used to do a Sunday radio show on a dance music station, so I was always soundtracking people's comedowns. Regularly I'd be in the same state of mind. I don't do that now, but it used to give me great pleasure.
umma gumma
dubonaire wrote:

The ponderous trippy words of Ricky Lee Jones "little fluffy clouds" would have been like discovering gold. Leslie Nielsens' Board of Canada voice over samples on BOC's Geodaddi are possibly that album's secret sauce.


agree 100%, those samples are a huge part of the effect. but it took someone to use & manipulate them, blend with the sound

and again, thx for all the insight. those must have been great times!
unrecordings
I was there and I barely remember it... Rockin' Banana!
GGW
Here's a gear list from 1993:

http://www.oldschooldaw.com/forums/index.php?topic=1396.0


Not sure when the Peel sessions was. I thought this was the era of early samplers and DATs.
umma gumma
ah great info/link, thx!!

to the best of my knowledge, that 1st track ( "pulsating" ) was done 1989, before Patterson & Cauty/KLF split up

I found an interview somewhere where Patteron said " I was feeding Jimmy all these samples, and he was mixing them live. I think it was the best version of that song we ever did."
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