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WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

The Moog One
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> General Gear Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 36, 37, 38, 39  Next [all]
Author The Moog One
Panason
bkbirge wrote:

This one has electric bass and tr626 along with MO...


Finally, some funk! applause
Heaven
Sinamsis wrote:
Quick improv with the modular and the One using the STG Rhodes patch. Sorry for the sloppy playing.




Do you really need all this gear to make this kind of music?
lisa
Heaven wrote:
Do you really need all this gear to make this kind of music?

Does anyone for any kind of music? meh

I get that you are irritated about someone not using their expensive equipment in a way you see fit but that kind of comment is just mean and reflects poorly on you.
Gizmo
Sometimes, furniture is used to make music.



Sinamsis
Heaven wrote:
Sinamsis wrote:
Quick improv with the modular and the One using the STG Rhodes patch. Sorry for the sloppy playing.




Do you really need all this gear to make this kind of music?


Ha that’s quite the conclusion to draw from a brief clip. Do I need any gear? No. But I have it. And I make a variety of “kinds of music” with it, because that’s what I enjoy. What “kind of music” should I be making?
filtermod
Sinamsis wrote:
Heaven wrote:
Sinamsis wrote:
Quick improv with the modular and the One using the STG Rhodes patch. Sorry for the sloppy playing.




Do you really need all this gear to make this kind of music?


Ha that’s quite the conclusion to draw from a brief clip. Do I need any gear? No. But I have it. And I make a variety of “kinds of music” with it, because that’s what I enjoy. What “kind of music” should I be making?

You should be making whatever music or noise you want with it and enjoying it.
I have a feeling you're doing it right. Chugging Beers
Sinamsis
filtermod
Ha, thanks, I imagined I was too. The snide comment does bring up a good point though. Having all these options in one synth can be overwhelming and at times distracting. That said, having all these options available does not imply that they all have to be use on every patch. Similarly, I don't necessarily feel the need to use every instrument I own on every piece. Anyways, I haven't had a ton of time with it (this is the busiest time of the year for work, and two kids under two) but I've been slowly picking specific features and exploring them. The control over LFOs is phenomenal. Various speeds ranges, control over each shape, single cycle mode, global or per voice function... They supplement the envelopes nicely. Yesterday I explored the ring mod very briefly. Sounds great to me. What I have struggled with:

- Gain staging. Lately I've struggled to match the level of presets. That said I've not noticed a higher than normal noise floor. However, right now I'm confined to my living room with a pair of Genelec 8010As, so not ideal listening conditions. But I do find it challenging to match levels across patches. I think I just need more time here.
- I've not been happy with the FM sounds I've been getting. That said, filter FM's very well.


Otherwise there's so much I have to explore. I haven't dug into the looping envelopes. I have not explored the FX in much detail. And I've only begun to scratch the surface of the sequencer.

All in all, I've just been really blown away by the capabilities of this synth, even though I've only scratched the surface. I really don't think I'll be keeping my Andromeda. It really has made me lose interest in any other analog poly. Of course there's always room for improvement. But I'm happy with it already.
unknownartist
bc3 wrote:
paults wrote:
Quote:
they do keep the device cooler, and are often easier to replace , and for that I prefer them.


No, and HELL NO in this instance. This is a full custom supply, with a custom cord. If you are lucky, the replacement will only be $129.

BTW: it has 7 fans in it, not 'a fan'.

The ONLY reason it's external is to bypass UL/CE registration. But hmmm...when I designed the MG-1 power supply in 1981, it's internal. We paid for UL/FCC registration. it's called "part of doing business".

The irony is: it's 10x EASIER to pass UL/CE today that 20-30 years ago, when using internal supplies. What you do, is buy pre-registered, enclosed supplies, the proper UL VW-1 94-VO rated 600V wire, and a UL registered power

inlet/fuse holder. Slap on some heat shrink and done. Yes, you still have to PAY and submit paperwork, but it's NOT THE SAME as building a supply "from scratch" like in the old days.

It's being cheap and lazy and not thinking about the customer first but yourself (Moog) first.

Protip: if you want to keep things 'cooler', stop putting quad-core Linux computers with 14,000 parts in a synth.


Your comment pretty much sums up why I personally do not and will not support any of your endeavors Paul. Yes you have vast technical knowledge and a history but I believe that your demeanor always comes across as a little snobby and off putting for an electronics designer and manufacture.

The older I get it seems to become more apparent when the engineer forgets about the user and the human interaction with a machine. Your designs have always lacked this for me even when there have been some really great sounds coming out of them (e352). Oh well but luckily there are folks who take other factors into consideration when designing an instrument for the rest of us mere mortals.



I'm in the opposite camp in that I'm grateful for Paul's contribution and am happy support your work in the future. Snobbery or not, which I find comical and justified, I really appreciate that you strip away the bs and provide factual wisdom to those less knowledgable.

I prefer not to beat around the bush, without knowing the nuances of why, the external power supply feels pathetic for such a full on effort in my opinion. It was a deal breaker for the Minimoog reissue for me, and it's a shame to see the same thing on the Moog One. It's a beautiful piece of gear no doubt. For now I remain very content with a Prophet 6 which is one of the great instruments I've laid my hands on.
Gizmo
Sinamsis wrote:
Having all these options in one synth can be overwhelming and at times distracting. That said, having all these options available does not imply that they all have to be use on every patch.
Yes, precisely. These points apply as well to any large modular system. To state the obvious, it is neither necessary nor sensible for every patch to use each and every module in your system. At least AFAIK. meh

Sinamsis wrote:
Similarly, I don't necessarily feel the need to use every instrument I own on every piece.
Right, same logic. Use only what is necessary and sensible for the music.
tobb
Chevron87 wrote:
I'd love to know how close you can get with the Moog One to the monster sounds you can get from the Memory Moog


Me too!
Dcramer
Gizmo wrote:
Yes, precisely. These points apply as well to any large modular system. To state the obvious, it is neither necessary nor sensible for every patch to use each and every module in your system.


Quick! Hold my beer! lol
Gizmo
Dcramer wrote:
Gizmo wrote:
Yes, precisely. These points apply as well to any large modular system. To state the obvious, it is neither necessary nor sensible for every patch to use each and every module in your system.


Quick! Hold my beer! lol

I admit to being facetious. A patch is not a patch so long as there are open jacks.
tehyar
Decided today that I'm holding out for when they do customizable versions, like they did with the Voyager. I'm holding out for one with blue lights and aluminum to replace the wood.

It helps stave off the gas. hihi
Chartreuse-J
Here is an honest question witch I have asked myself lately...

Should I sell all or most of my eurorack modular to fund a 16 voice One?

I could easily sell most of my Cwejman to gain 5k in net with plenty of modules left over to fill the remaining balance.

What would you do?

Edit: the only thing that bothers me about the One, is that it uses a power brick.
gentle_attack
Gizmo wrote:
Dcramer wrote:
Gizmo wrote:
Yes, precisely. These points apply as well to any large modular system. To state the obvious, it is neither necessary nor sensible for every patch to use each and every module in your system.


Quick! Hold my beer! lol

I admit to being facetious. A patch is not a patch so long as there are open jacks.

You can attenuate down to zero/almost zero, but I agree. Everything that can be used, must be.
Sinamsis
Chartreuse-J wrote:
Here is an honest question witch I have asked myself lately...

Should I sell all or most of my eurorack modular to fund a 16 voice One?

I could easily sell most of my Cwejman to gain 5k in net with plenty of modules left over to fill the remaining balance.

What would you do?

Edit: the only thing that bothers me about the One, is that it uses a power brick.


I love my One, but I would say no. Very different, and pleasing in different ways. Unless you're particularly unhappy with your eurorack system, or use it in a very traditional East coast sort of way that could be accomplished on a 3 timbre fixed architecture synth. I could see replacing a few fixed architecture synths with the One. For me, the only synth it has replaced is the Andromeda. I may slim down further with time, but right now I'm pretty happy with where things are. I haven't once thought the One could replace the modular, though pairing down crossed my mind. It's a very flexible synthesizer, but it's still not my eurorack system.
Sinamsis
Finally got around to shooting a video, albeit a sloppy one.

Franktree
Sinamsis wrote:
Finally got around to shooting a video, albeit a sloppy one.



Sounds great. Are they patches you built, or presets?
Franktree
Sinamsis wrote:
What I have struggled with:

- Gain staging. Lately I've struggled to match the level of presets. That said I've not noticed a higher than normal noise floor. However, right now I'm confined to my living room with a pair of Genelec 8010As, so not ideal listening conditions. But I do find it challenging to match levels across patches. I think I just need more time here.
- I've not been happy with the FM sounds I've been getting. That said, filter FM's very well.


Some things that seem to help with gain staging:

Make sure your main timbre oscillator is at full volume in the mixer.
Make sure you run the VCA hot.
If you're only using one filter, make sure the mix knob is set to that filter.
Keep the main output down as low as you can (between 3 and 4 is what I keep hearing).
Turn off all the inserts if you're not using them.
Sinamsis
Franktree wrote:
Sinamsis wrote:
Finally got around to shooting a video, albeit a sloppy one.



Sounds great. Are they patches you built, or presets?


Thank you. My patches. Ha, the video certainly wasn't to showcase the playing. I have yet to totally go through the patches. Many people have complained about the factory patches. I think they're ok. I never spend to much time on factory patches, but I always like to hear what others have done.

Thanks for the tips. The turning off the inserts is something I always forget how to do. And yeah, I definitely keep the master volume level relatively low.
Franktree
Sinamsis wrote:
The turning off the inserts is something I always forget how to do.


I don't have it in front of me at the moment, but I'm pretty sure it's in the "more" part of the master output section. If not that, then the "more" of the VCA section.
brianc
[quote="oscilloscope"]
paults wrote:

If DSI can do an internal power supply on a $2,500 desktop unit, I'd expect Moog to manage on a $7,000 machine

The DSI analog synths use cheap Mean Well PT-65 switching PSU's. There are literally the cheapest, dirtiest off-the-shelf PSU's you can buy (about $12 in quantity). They post-regulate the various rails and it works fine in the application but it should not be viewed as better than the Moog One just because they stuck it inside the unit. Also, the relatively low power -15V rail (regulated to -12V) is one of the factors that limit the OB-6 to 6 voices.
thesnow
[quote="brianc"]
oscilloscope wrote:
paults wrote:

If DSI can do an internal power supply on a $2,500 desktop unit, I'd expect Moog to manage on a $7,000 machine

The DSI analog synths use cheap Mean Well PT-65 switching PSU's. There are literally the cheapest, dirtiest off-the-shelf PSU's you can buy (about $12 in quantity). They post-regulate the various rails and it works fine in the application but it should not be viewed as better than the Moog One just because they stuck it inside the unit. Also, the relatively low power -15V rail (regulated to -12V) is one of the factors that limit the OB-6 to 6 voices.


Dead Banana
tobb
Sinamsis wrote:
]Finally got around to shooting a video, albeit a sloppy one.


Thanks for the demo,some great sounds !
calaveras
[quote="brianc"]
oscilloscope wrote:
paults wrote:

If DSI can do an internal power supply on a $2,500 desktop unit, I'd expect Moog to manage on a $7,000 machine

The DSI analog synths use cheap Mean Well PT-65 switching PSU's. There are literally the cheapest, dirtiest off-the-shelf PSU's you can buy (about $12 in quantity). They post-regulate the various rails and it works fine in the application but it should not be viewed as better than the Moog One just because they stuck it inside the unit. Also, the relatively low power -15V rail (regulated to -12V) is one of the factors that limit the OB-6 to 6 voices.

That what I think when I play my OB6 "damn I wish they had used a lab grade power supply and not that Meanwell that every other Eurorack company uses"
It's really keeping me from fully realizing my Carpenter-esque Zydeco.
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