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Poll: Sliding Nuts vs Threaded Strips
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Eurorack Modules Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next [all]

Do you prefer:
Sliding Nuts
25%
 25%  [ 56 ]
Threaded Strips
74%
 74%  [ 160 ]
Total Votes : 216

Author Poll: Sliding Nuts vs Threaded Strips
StrangeAttraction
Hello
I know there have been zillions posts on sliding nuts vs threaded strips, but I realised nobody actually run a poll to get an overall sentiment of the MW community.

As I'm about to venture out of my 6U 104HP (with sliding nuts) into a new 9U or 12U case, I'm wondering if I should go with threaded strips as I haven't tried them yet.
The difference seems to be:
- sliding nuts: cheap, can be pain in the ass to install modules with, though for me it's been OK by using a magnetic screwdriver/pen; no gaps between modules
- threaded strips: more expensive, small gaps between modules, might require one to shuffle the modules if non-standard module widths, easier to install modules in general than with sliding nuts

Any comments welcome
cheers
cptnal
Threaded strips. I've got to the point where I think, "gaaaar! A gap" when I'm installing a module, then never think of it again.
Risc_Terilia
Threaded strips and modules with stadium shaped bolt holes is god tier imo
Rigo
Sliding square nuts ... not to be confused with not-so-sliding hexagonal nuts.
vytis
Threaded strips + Doepfer modules = PERFECT. They always line up beautifully.
Threaded strips + stadium shaped holes are kind of OK, but I find them a bit more difficult to align.
Sliding nuts suck.
But that's only me. This is fun!
orbita
You should list as an advantage for sliding nuts that you can slide the modules around with only loosening the screws. So inserting a module in the middle of a row doesn't require unscrewing all the other modules.

You can list a disadvantage of sliding nuts is that you can only leave one nut between modules so you either have to stash some behind modules or can only add new modules at the end of the row. obviously some cases this isn't possible.

I would like to see a "Magic screw/plug", A plastic screw that you press in and requires no nut and when pushed in, allows the module to slide and then twists to lock.
defalut
Disadvantage of sliding nuts; when you are pushing the dB´s any gaps in your rack and the nuts rattle from the sub. BOOM!
defenestration
the only instance I would even consider sliding nuts is if I go crazy on making sure a portable case design is as light as possible
simka
threaded strips

thinking how many sliding nuts to leave behind each module to utilize the ability to unscrew module slightly and move it around to insert new one would drive me crazy and after a couple of such movements i would be further triggered by the fact that modules are not connected to nearest header and cables are starting to tangle.
lisa
I thought people where silly about the agony of using sliding nuts but then I got a case with sliding nuts myself and now I feel that people aren’t complaining enough. angry
gonkulator
I replaced all of my sliding nut cases with threaded strips. I rearrange modules a lot, and I would go (even more) insane if I had to deal with sliding nuts. I couldn't care less about gaps, and with black face plates I don't even notice them.
khyber
Sliding nuts forever. It's of paramount importance to make sure your rails are the correct size for the sliding nuts you use, otherwise you'll have trouble with ones getting stuck or falling out of the rail, but otherwise I've never had an issue with mine.
lud
Sliding nuts are such a headache lining up and rattling around. They work eventually but a real pain in the butt!
mdoudoroff
I hate them both.
Risc_Terilia
mdoudoroff wrote:
I hate them both.


Yeah I find it easier to mount all my modules on the inside of a giant spinning wheel and the centrifugal force keeps them in place.
companyofquail
an OCD odyssey

sliding nuts
orbita
honey roasted nuts
Multi Grooves
Risc_Terilia wrote:
mdoudoroff wrote:
I hate them both.


Yeah I find it easier to mount all my modules on the inside of a giant spinning wheel and the centrifugal force keeps them in place.



Pffttt... Magnets or GTFO >>>>>¦
pieter
Sliding nuts and round holes. I regret nothing.
Multi Grooves
Are folk still not using paramagnetic screws with magnetic screwdrivers? Are, your screws long enough? If your holes are fixed and you want to drop/swap modules that are located central in the row, half of your modules have to come out to facilitate this.
Leave a spare unused sliding nut in between each used one i.e. a spare nut between each module and you can swap around to your heart's content.

I just don't get the soiled bed sheets.
seriously, i just don't get it
cg_funk
pieter wrote:
Sliding nuts and round holes. I regret nothing.


Oh there you go! Best of both worlds right there. applause

I happen to dislike open gaps enough to micro-mange my sliding nuts, but I can totally see how people would hate them.
ersatzplanet
StrangeAttraction wrote:

- sliding nuts: cheap, can be pain in the ass to install modules with, though for me it's been OK by using a magnetic screwdriver/pen; no gaps between modules

The problem is replacing a module in the middle when there are not enough nuts there for them.
Also you are just swapping a bunch of very little gaps (unless the module maker has overdone his tolerances) for a much bigger one at the end of a row. If you are lucky, and your row is long enough, that gap *may* equal on full HP, but that is really rare.

StrangeAttraction wrote:

- threaded strips: more expensive, small gaps between modules, might require one to shuffle the modules if non-standard module widths, easier to install modules in general than with sliding nuts


I have easily over 1000HP of threaded rails and never had any gaps too big for me. The slotted holes and basic hole slop help in the odd case of a module that the makers tolerances allowed to get too big (novice front panel designers sometimes design to a perfect HP which is not going to happen unless they really pay for the metal shop to do it).

Non-standard module widths are not a problem, the problem is with modules from Analogue Systems that are standard HP widths but have hole in non-Doepfer places (0.2" from the edge instead of 0.3") witch will leave a 1/2HP space. Doepfer sells 1.5HP blanks for this purpose. For the 5 AS modules I have in my rig, I just drilled new holes in them.

Threaded strips can be hard to find in long rail lengths too. You can easily file the ends of 84HP rails to make them fit perfectly if the ones you get are the ones with extra metal on the ends.

There is another compromise solution that is a hybrid of the two. Cut a threaded strip into sections that are appropriate for the typical sized modules you use most (basically the distance between two near holes). These small "rail slices" can then slide in place where needed, allowing positioning using the part sticking out from the modules and also leaving easy access to the next module to screw in. This will not remove all gaps, there still may be one between modules sharing a slice, but slotted holes or hole slop can often fix this. These gaps will be absorbed by the many 8HP modules that only have a hole on one side. The rail slice sticking out of a module at the hole-less side of that module, will allow easy alignment with the hole on the new module, but still tuck under the already mounted module that doesn't have a hole on that side.

Not a perfect solution of course, but for me, a better one than dealing with just sliding nuts. Not as cheap as sliding nuts, but cheaper than full threaded strips. I have one mini skiff I made using the smallest vector rails size. That one and only experience with sliding nuts as put me off of them forever. I just don't have the patience or time to deal with them. Ant added expense is WELL worth it for me.
pinkflag16
I voted sliding nuts because that's what I have (Make Noise 7u case), and I got used to them. Leave a few in between for future modules, and things work out ok. That being said, they are still a pain in the ass.
circuitbent
I give the slight edge to threaded strips, but I have cases with both types.

Protip: Leave out the nuts/strips and just use self-tapping metal screws directly into the rails.
JohnLRice
ersatzplanet wrote:
There is another compromise solution that is a hybrid of the two. Cut a threaded strip into sections that are appropriate for the typical sized modules you use most (basically the distance between two near holes). These small "rail slices" can then slide in place where needed, allowing positioning using the part sticking out from the modules and also leaving easy access to the next module to screw in. This will not remove all gaps, there still may be one between modules sharing a slice, but slotted holes or hole slop can often fix this. These gaps will be absorbed by the many 8HP modules that only have a hole on one side. The rail slice sticking out of a module at the hole-less side of that module, will allow easy alignment with the hole on the new module, but still tuck under the already mounted module that doesn't have a hole on that side.
thumbs up Agreed, I've done this a couple times and think that some smart person will one day sell thread strip chunks! Om
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