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Make Noise Maths Problem
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Eurorack Modules  
Author Make Noise Maths Problem
ncoded
Dear Wigglers,

As I noob I have these problems sometime :(

I don't understand what the SIGNAL INPUT does exactly on the MATHS?
[thats the very top left and right inputs, as u probs knew]

Cheers in advance for help as the manual is not illuminating me (ie. too noob to get it)

Nick
Skilling
For starters, think of it as a gate input. If you are using Maths as an envelope it's the same thing as the gate on an ordinary ADSR.

One for the left side and one for the right side.
darcmorcel
More precisely, for an enveloppe use, you'll get an Attack + Release (AR) envelope through the trigger input and an Attack+Sustain+Release (ASR) through the signal input.

Check out the Maths manual for other uses of the signal input.

And globaly, rtfm AND take some time to watch the Make Noise video tutorials smile
cptnal
If the manual's not helping I'd suggest having a look around YouTube. There are plenty demos out there that explain things by example.
darcmorcel


ncoded
Thanks guys. I think I gettit now AND I'm gunna watch the MATHS lessons.
chysn
Think of the channel 1 and 4 signal inputs as the voltage that Maths is trying to reach for that channel.
geetee
Skilling wrote:
For starters, think of it as a gate input. If you are using Maths as an envelope it's the same thing as the gate on an ordinary ADSR.

One for the left side and one for the right side.


that's wrong though. that's what the trigger input does, not the cv input as he is describing.
cptnal
geetee wrote:
Skilling wrote:
For starters, think of it as a gate input. If you are using Maths as an envelope it's the same thing as the gate on an ordinary ADSR.

One for the left side and one for the right side.


that's wrong though. that's what the trigger input does, not the cv input as he is describing.


Indeed. The CV input is passed through to the output, slewed by the rise and fall times. Trigger fires off an instance of the function, making an attack/decay (rise/fall) envelope.
subdo
geetee wrote:
Skilling wrote:
For starters, think of it as a gate input. If you are using Maths as an envelope it's the same thing as the gate on an ordinary ADSR.

One for the left side and one for the right side.


that's wrong though. that's what the trigger input does, not the cv input as he is describing.


No. Both do this. The difference in the context of a EG is that the trigger input only listens for the rising edge of the gate so it will immediately enter the FALL part of the envelope as soon as RISE is complete. The cv input on the other hand will not start the FALL portion of the envelope until the falling edge of the gate i.e. a sustain section.
cptnal
subdo wrote:
geetee wrote:
Skilling wrote:
For starters, think of it as a gate input. If you are using Maths as an envelope it's the same thing as the gate on an ordinary ADSR.

One for the left side and one for the right side.


that's wrong though. that's what the trigger input does, not the cv input as he is describing.


No. Both do this. The difference in the context of a EG is that the trigger input only listens for the rising edge of the gate so it will immediately enter the FALL part of the envelope as soon as RISE is complete. The cv input on the other hand will not start the FALL portion of the envelope until the falling edge of the gate i.e. a sustain section.


...almost the same but not quite. Point to note is that using the CV input will result in a function whose maximum is determined by the incoming signal. Using the trigger input always results in a 10V peak (at the unity output anyway).
ncoded
the fact that there's confusion here makes my noobiness seem slightly more manageable. lol. thanks for the help guys!!
cptnal
ncoded wrote:
the fact that there's confusion here makes my noobiness seem slightly more manageable. lol. thanks for the help guys!!


Maths reveals its secrets slowly. thumbs up
Agawell
also I'd recommend googling for the illustrated maths manual - make sure you get the right version as there are a few - lots more examples of patches - and surprisingly, it's illustrated
pugix
Maths is basically a dual lag processor, similar to the Serge DUSG that Maths is based on. If you learn about voltage controlled lag processors in general, and study articles about the DUSG, which are easily found, you'll be in a better position to unpack Maths.
Skilling
cptnal wrote:
subdo wrote:
geetee wrote:
Skilling wrote:
For starters, think of it as a gate input. If you are using Maths as an envelope it's the same thing as the gate on an ordinary ADSR.

One for the left side and one for the right side.


that's wrong though. that's what the trigger input does, not the cv input as he is describing.


No. Both do this. The difference in the context of a EG is that the trigger input only listens for the rising edge of the gate so it will immediately enter the FALL part of the envelope as soon as RISE is complete. The cv input on the other hand will not start the FALL portion of the envelope until the falling edge of the gate i.e. a sustain section.


...almost the same but not quite. Point to note is that using the CV input will result in a function whose maximum is determined by the incoming signal. Using the trigger input always results in a 10V peak (at the unity output anyway).


You're absolutely right of course, that's why I used the term "think of it". I do believe it's a good start to understand the envelope side of Maths and if you want to have sustain you have to use Signal in. Trig is NOT gate.
Skilling
pugix wrote:
Maths is basically a dual lag processor, similar to the Serge DUSG that Maths is based on. If you learn about voltage controlled lag processors in general, and study articles about the DUSG, which are easily found, you'll be in a better position to unpack Maths.


And this is of course a very useful advise.
Skilling
Another way to use the signal in: run the 1v/oct signal through the Maths using the signal input. Now you have a glide function. The rise parameter decides the glide when you're going to higher notes and the fall decides the glide to the lower notes.
degeneratedsines
Signal input: slew processor for input
Trig input: 0-10v AR envelope generator
Foghorn
Think of it this way, if the "T" was silent, then Maths spelled backwards is
SHAM


Foghorn,

Dysfunctional helpfulness for your education
Bignorthumbrian
Foghorn wrote:
Think of it this way, if the "T" was silent, then Maths spelled backwards is
SHAM


Foghorn,

Dysfunctional helpfulness for your education


Or if the the T and S were silent, then Maths spelt backwards would be HAM....mmmmm...HAM....
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