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Bandpass, Band pass, Band-pass
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Modular Synth General Discussion  

Which term is correct?
Band Pass
10%
 10%  [ 4 ]
Band-pass
12%
 12%  [ 5 ]
Bandpass
76%
 76%  [ 30 ]
Total Votes : 39

Author Bandpass, Band pass, Band-pass
fluxmonkey
you know, just to stir the pot
nikmis
Bandpass

and oddly enough, today I just started putting together a 194 fixed bandpass filter circuit board that I think you made? a couple years ago. I didn't buy it from you but got it as part of a trade
fluxmonkey
nikmis wrote:
Bandpass

and oddly enough, today I just started putting together a 194 fixed bandpass filter circuit board that I think you made? a couple years ago. I didn't buy it from you but got it as part of a trade


ha! i was updating my PCB pages and realized i had it a couple different ways, that's why i was asking. that's a great circuit, enjoy!
Pelsea
Bandpass. It's in transition. The Chicago Manual of Style indicates band-pass should be considered a "phrasal adjective" made up of a verb (pass) with an adverb (band), and should be hyphenated to keep the meaning clear. However, the word bandpass is common enough that most dictionaries list it as an adjective. Textbooks (including mine, after a short spat with the editor) use band-pass, but practically everyone else uses bandpass.
commodorejohn
BPF. Because it sounds like an onomatopoeia that you'd find in Bloom County.
Synthbuilder
I tend to use band pass.

Wiki uses the hyphenated version, but also accepts the single word.

I'm still going to keep using band pass.

But the how about sinewave or sine wave?

Tony
cornutt
It's interesting... I see bandpass a lot, and lowpass some. I never see highpass.
Pelsea
Synthbuilder wrote:

But how about sinewave or sine wave?


Sine wave. Wave is a noun, which is modified by sine to indicate the type of wave. There is no ambiguity since sine identifies a function (shape). Band pass filter is ambiguous because three nouns in a row could have more than one meaning. (Assume you are reading the phrase but have no knowledge of what filter, pass, or band mean in this context. Band pass-filter? )

Sinewave is not common enough to be listed as a word yet (it is a trademark for a bicycle company.) Even this rather lame spell checker flags it.
hsosdrum
Pelsea wrote:
Band pass filter is ambiguous because three nouns in a row could have more than one meaning. (Assume you are reading the phrase but have no knowledge of what filter, pass, or band mean in this context. Band pass-filter? )

Right. That's why the CMS says that the double modifier preceding a noun is always hyphenated — so it's clear which words are the modifiers:

band pass filter [Is that what happens as the marching band passes by me?]
band pass-filter [WTF's a "pass-filter"? Is it part of that marching band?]
band-pass filter [OK, it's some sort of special filter. I need to find out what "band-pass" means.]
hsosdrum
My pet peeve is the incorrect use of the word "subsonic":

Subsonic: That which travels slower than the speed of sound.

Infrasonic: Vibrations that are lower in frequency than humans can hear.

There is NO SUCH THING as a "subsonic filter" (which would be a filter that travels slower than the speed of sound). A filter that removes frequencies that are lower than humans can hear is an INFRASONIC FILTER. Period.

Subsonic pairs with supersonic; infrasonic pairs with ultrasonic.

I've seen the word "subsonic" misused in the professional and consumer audio industries for the past 40 years by people who should know better. Drives me crazy.
kwaidan
According to the Oxford Dictionary, bandpass is an adjective or noun.

Adjective:
(of a filter) transmitting only a set range of frequencies.
‘a 1–40 Hz bandpass filter’

Noun:
The range of frequencies which are transmitted through a bandpass filter.
‘a bandpass of 0.8–50 Hz’
CZ Rider
Back in the 60's, Bob Moog labled his modules as, Low Pass, High Pass, Band Reject and Band Pass. Since these were among the first voltage controlled filters, I would think Bob had it right?






Now the Roland made up word to describe "Paraphonic", has lost it's original meaning.



Somewhere someone decided it meant a polyphonic synth with only one filter? lol
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