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WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

RIP Alan R. Pearlman
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Modular Synth General Discussion Goto page 1, 2  Next [all]
Author RIP Alan R. Pearlman
goom
http://www.synthtopia.com/content/2019/01/06/arp-founder-alan-r-pearlm an-has-died/
Rex Coil 7
My very first synthesizer was an ARP Axxe. I bought it brand new from an ARP dealer in Phoenix Arizona in 1978 (I was 17yrs old) a few weeks after I attended my very first "rock concert" .... Emerson Lake and Palmer. I hounded my mother to drive me from Tucson to Phoenix to pick it up. I sold my precious racing dirtbike to pay for it.

This is a picture I took of it in my bedroom in 1978 about a week or so after I bought it, sitting on top of my also newly acquired 1960-something Hammond M100.



luketeaford
There goes a legend. I got into synths when some guy brought a 2600 to a school assembly in... 1994? I remember him jamming out some basslines and mentioning offhandedly that it was an instrument used by Depeche Mode and Nine Inch Nails-- the sound of that thing (and frankly the look of it too!) made me interested in synths.
Dave Peck
The Arp 2600 was the first synth I ever got my hands on in 1972 and that synth was how I first learned about analog synthesis. And the Arp Odyssey was the first synth I owned, bought 45 years ago in 1973 at the age of 13:



And by coincidence, just yesterday I spent an hour or so on a rainy afternoon playing my restored 1978 REV II black & gold Arp Odyssey. Time well spent. Thank you, Mr. Pearlman.
Rex Coil 7
Rex Coil 7 wrote:
My very first synthesizer was an ARP Axxe. I bought it brand new from an ARP dealer in Phoenix Arizona in 1978 (I was 17yrs old)


Dave Peck wrote:
... the Arp Odyssey was the first synth I owned, bought 45 years ago in 1973 at the age of 13....
Ok, you win! Checkered Flag Mr. Green
Dave Peck
hihi This is fun!
DSC
RIP, true visionary!
cornutt
Wow. I was just thinking about him the other day. A lot of people don't realize that he had a significant career before ARP and electronic music. Pearlman was a pioneer in designing operational amplifiers, back in the day when they were implemented with vacuum tubes. He worked for a company called George A. Philbrick Researches. Then, he and some co-workers formed their own company called Nexus in the early '60s. Some of the op amps they developed were used in the Apollo spacecraft. It was the money from the sale of Nexus that Pearlman used to launch ARP.
cornutt
BTW, according to my notes, he was born in 1925. So he was either 94 or 95 years old.
jkjelec
Shine on Alan R. Pearlman! We'll never forget the joy you brought us! Guinness ftw!

My first analog synth was an ARP Solus.
goom
cornutt wrote:
Wow. I was just thinking about him the other day. A lot of people don't realize that he had a significant career before ARP and electronic music. Pearlman was a pioneer in designing operational amplifiers, back in the day when they were implemented with vacuum tubes. He worked for a company called George A. Philbrick Researches. Then, he and some co-workers formed their own company called Nexus in the early '60s. Some of the op amps they developed were used in the Apollo spacecraft. It was the money from the sale of Nexus that Pearlman used to launch ARP.


That's incredible... I didn't know about that. Thank you for sharing.
Rex Coil 7
cornutt wrote:
BTW, according to my notes, he was born in 1925. So he was either 94 or 95 years old.
His daughter said he was 93.

LINK = http://www.synthtopia.com/content/2019/01/06/arp-founder-alan-r-pearlm an-has-died/

This is amazing ... how any of us would want to leave this mortal coil ...

.... "At 93, too weak to speak he still managed to play the piano this morning, later passing away peacefully in the afternoon." ....

Hobbes
jorg
I had no idea he was still alive! Now I'm doubly saddened.
groovar
wow. another legend. odyssey was one of my first "exposures" into this sound world

and who can forget close encounters ending...
magneteyez
jorg wrote:
I had no idea he was still alive! Now I'm doubly saddened.

Me neither. Too bad he’s gone. On the other hand he passed away peacefully at 93 after playing the piano in the morning.
If I can choose my way of passing I’d choose this way. Clap
jkjelec
He solved the "temperature stable VCO" issue that the early Moog and other analog synthesizers suffered from.
fireclown
Oddly enough, I chose to watch Close Encounters yesterday on Netflix.
Passed out before the 2500 but not before spotting a CS 40?
Had an Avatar with pickup long ago, only a time or two via guitar, mostly off
the back of some other keyboard.
eventually a pawn shop Solus spotlit the filter shortcomings on the Avatar and then like dust they scattered.
Imagine Moog without ARP on the scene.
Crucial contributor.
pirx
Very sad news. RIP.

I had the honor of briefly chatting with him at a local ARP meetup a few years back. He seemed a kind, warm and gentle person.
Luap
For anyone that hasn't seen it, he was interviewed not too long ago for the Bright Sparks documentary. Dennis Colin (ARP engineer/designer) who also passed away not so long ago is also in it.
Well worth a watch..
http://brightsparks.movie
goom
Luap wrote:
For anyone that hasn't seen it, he was interviewed not too long ago for the Bright Sparks documentary. Dennis Colin (ARP engineer/designer) who also passed away not so long ago is also in it.
Well worth a watch..
http://brightsparks.movie


Wow! I've never heard of this video, but it looks great! Thank you for posting about it.
fitzgreyve
Back in 1982 I spent four months studying at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (Mass, USA) which Pearlman had attended (in the 1940's ?).

I discovered that he had donated an ARP 2600 to them (1975?) , which nobody else seemed to use much at that time - many fun lunchtimes were spent playing with it.
groovar
Thanks so much for posting that movie I also didn’t know about it
Licudi
What was the relationship between Alan R. Pearlman and David Friend following the demise of ARP? I ask as Korg's publicity campaign around the Odyssey remake focussed on Friend.
cornutt
Licudi wrote:
What was the relationship between Alan R. Pearlman and David Friend following the demise of ARP?


Not good. From what I've read, Friend was part of the group that wanted to develop the Avatar, and drove Pearlman out of management because of his opposition to it. Friend got out of the music business for a long time after ARP collapsed. I was rather surprised when the Korg Odyssey thing happened, but I assume that they could not use the trademarks without Pearlman's blessing, so some kind of a deal must have been made. EDIT -- this last bit might not be true; I don't know for sure what happened to the ARP trademarks in the bankruptcy proceedings. Phillip Dodds, ARP's chief engineer (and another person who opposed the Avatar project) was the trustee appointed by the bankruptcy court, and it was him that determined how most of the assets were disposed of. It's possible that someone else got the trademark rights in the sale. It's also possible that the trademarks have since lapsed, and Korg was able to grab them.
Licudi
cornutt wrote:
Licudi wrote:
What was the relationship between Alan R. Pearlman and David Friend following the demise of ARP?

Not good. From what I've read, Friend was part of the group that wanted to develop the Avatar, and drove Pearlman out of management because of his opposition to it.


Thanks. The excellent Keyboard article on all this is preserved at Rhodeschroma.com No-one comes out of the story well, though Philip Dodds does conclude:

Quote:
"One person who was very much maligned during the troubles at ARP was Al Pearlman. And he was, throughout, the one who categorically defended the correct path, or what ultimately proved to be the correct path, the one who fought the dumb decisions. And right down the line he was ridden over like a Mack truck. I don't think he's ever gotten credit for being the defender of what was ethical and what was correct. The guy definitely ought to be given a little more credit."

http://www.rhodeschroma.com/?id=arp

Perhaps more appropriate to this thread, there was a lovely tribute to Alan by Dave Spiers in yesterday's Sonic Talk.
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