MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index
 FAQ & Terms of UseFAQ & Terms Of Use   Wiggler RadioMW Radio   Muff Wiggler TwitterTwitter   Support the site @ PatreonPatreon 
 SearchSearch   RegisterSign up   Log inLog in 
WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

NI synths sound
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> General Gear  
Author NI synths sound
anselmi
I was playing with Native Instruments TRK-01 Bass ensembles for Reaktor and I was blown away by the quality of sound and the versatility of the design that covers a lots of sonic territory, from "analog" to "western" and "modern"

This is not new, in the past I was amazed by the sound of some other Reaktor ensembles and wonder why there´s no hardware instruments that have such quality of sound and features

I mean, it´s all digital, but I can´t think about a single digital synth that get close to this software pieces seriously, i just don't get it

Same for the TRK-01 Kick ensemble, it´s killer, both in sound and design
Blingley
Same reason you don't see many innovative digital hardware products in general - the analogalypse is upon us. Not much market out there for new digital synths / fx, but people are willing to spend money on analog hardware on the premise that it gives them a sound that they cannot get in software.

The other part of it is that good ADC/DAC are are expensive.
nrrrd
And computing power is also expensive. I run reaktor on a £1200 MacBook Pro. Hardware synths seem to sell a lot if they're £500 or under.
ugokcen
I have also been playing with the TRK--01 Kick and Bass this past week (they are still free by the way, grab them while you can), and yes they sound excellent to me too.

Another little known gem from NI are the drum synths in Maschine. You get different modules for kick, snare, hats, etc., with numerous algorithms for each. Sounds killer. Price of entry is the maschine mikro which is around $250.

I disagree that there is not much innovation in digital hardware or that computing power is holding people back. All mutable instruments modules are digital, so are noise engineering and they don't require powerful CPUs. It all depends on the skills of the developer. I would also put Elektron up there in quality with NI, though I'm not a fan of their workflow.

I think what is missing are simple dedicated hardware boxes. Manufacturers want to cram so many features to appeal to so many people that prices inevitably rise. Prophet X, Waldorf Quantum, Moog One are great feats of engineering but I doubt many of us can justify spending that kind of cash. Korg Volcas and the Roland Boutiques are good examples of bucking this trend but are too limited to keep the price down as low as possible. I happily paid $150 for a Volca FM but would be happier stil if it offered 6 note polyphony at a higher price. We need more capable machines around the $500 mark, if manufacturers are listening. Digitone as a sound module, a standalone maschine, or an old school keyboard sampler would be great.
Panason
Quote:
but people are willing to spend money on analog hardware on the premise that it gives them a sound that they cannot get in software.


I think I ought to start a thread on this important topic..... on Gearslutz twisted twisted twisted
powertran
I think licensing issues and the software life cycle puts people off software over hardware.
zeit
I agree, the Native Instruments Kick/Bass ensembles sound great! I think NI just has kick-ass programmers. grin NI stuff can be CPU heavy at times but not anymore than Arturia (which is another company that does some nice sounding synths, love the DX7 V, esp. the interface). I upgraded from an older PC this week...the new, faster one arrives tomorrow. w00t

Yes, I agree with the post above. We need more $500 digital synths that aren't toy-sized, with baby knobs. lol PreenFM is a good example of that price range. It has VST software too. Digitone as a module with no sequencer involved, that would sell well...or an Industrial Music Electronics desktop synth module. love
hermbot
There are a lot of things I like about NI, and the sound quality of their synths - Blocks especially - are top notch. (Someone saw a concept or early screenshot of blocks with the cables on the front... I hope that comes to fruition.)

Blocks is a wonderful playground and I have a lot of fun with them. Interesting side note - because of how "snapshots" and presets work in Reaktor, when you scroll through the presets keep in mind that the background wiring doesn't change. So they're able to get all of those different sounds and patches while keeping the wiring static, which is pretty cool IMO.
anselmi
ugokcen wrote:
I have also been playing with the TRK--01 Kick and Bass this past week (they are still free by the way, grab them while you can), and yes they sound excellent to me too.

Another little known gem from NI are the drum synths in Maschine. You get different modules for kick, snare, hats, etc., with numerous algorithms for each. Sounds killer. Price of entry is the maschine mikro which is around $250.

I disagree that there is not much innovation in digital hardware or that computing power is holding people back. All mutable instruments modules are digital, so are noise engineering and they don't require powerful CPUs. It all depends on the skills of the developer. I would also put Elektron up there in quality with NI, though I'm not a fan of their workflow.

I think what is missing are simple dedicated hardware boxes. Manufacturers want to cram so many features to appeal to so many people that prices inevitably rise. Prophet X, Waldorf Quantum, Moog One are great feats of engineering but I doubt many of us can justify spending that kind of cash. Korg Volcas and the Roland Boutiques are good examples of bucking this trend but are too limited to keep the price down as low as possible. I happily paid $150 for a Volca FM but would be happier stil if it offered 6 note polyphony at a higher price. We need more capable machines around the $500 mark, if manufacturers are listening. Digitone as a sound module, a standalone maschine, or an old school keyboard sampler would be great.


Noise Engineering OK

Mutable has great functional modules, but I they sounds flat and boring to me. And I´m not talking about the AUDIO quality, that could be OK, I mean the quality of sounds, that in NI stuff is another level.
Clever programming skills and great taste in how a musical instrument should sound makes a big difference
calaveras
nrrrd wrote:
And computing power is also expensive. I run reaktor on a £1200 MacBook Pro. Hardware synths seem to sell a lot if they're £500 or under.


Actually it isn't.
The wide prevalence of mobile devices has pushed the cost of Cortex AI type chips down quite a lot. This and the fertile DIY community around ATMega and Arduino CPUs.
There are a lot of chips that can be used to implement a digital synth with off the shelf parts. In fact the cheap ones out now are so much more powerful than the chips in 80's and 90's digital synths, that they wont need a ton of obscure ASICs and co-processors/DSP to get things done. Just look at the Streichfett. I think that box has 3 or 4 chips tops. Also I believe most if not all of the Critter and Guitari stuff is based on ARM chips.
anselmi
calaveras wrote:
nrrrd wrote:
And computing power is also expensive. I run reaktor on a £1200 MacBook Pro. Hardware synths seem to sell a lot if they're £500 or under.


Actually it isn't.
The wide prevalence of mobile devices has pushed the cost of Cortex AI type chips down quite a lot. This and the fertile DIY community around ATMega and Arduino CPUs.
There are a lot of chips that can be used to implement a digital synth with off the shelf parts. In fact the cheap ones out now are so much more powerful than the chips in 80's and 90's digital synths, that they wont need a ton of obscure ASICs and co-processors/DSP to get things done. Just look at the Streichfett. I think that box has 3 or 4 chips tops. Also I believe most if not all of the Critter and Guitari stuff is based on ARM chips.


yep...I don´t think it´s a processor power issue neither...
also the mentioned synths are not that complex, but they sounds great in every setting...the architecture is quite simple but delivers a ton of wonderful sounds...this is what I´d like to see in a piece of hw

just image a standalone NI groovebox with this kind of sound, I´d pay good money for something like this
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> General Gear  
Page 1 of 1
Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group