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Extend simple sequencer
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Eurorack Modules  
Author Extend simple sequencer
parallelepiped
I am new to modular. In fact I am probably a year away from buying my first module. I am trying to wrap my head around sequencing. Instead of relying on a computer or computer like module, I am considering using simple sequencers and extending them with utility modules like a sequential switch. My questions for people who have taken this path are:

What modules are you using to extend your sequencer?

Have you ever considered throwing in the towel and getting something like the ER-101?

Have you found any amazing synergies?

How are you sequencing the Basimilus Iteritas Alter? That thing seems awesome, but it seems like it needs a lot cv control to get the most out of it.

A little more info about me that may help you answer: I view myself as more of a composer than a musician. There is zero chance of me “playing” on a stage. I don’t play keyboard and don’t need one. Since I don’t plan on moving the case once built, space isn’t as important to me as everyone else. Space is cheap. Power on the other hand is expensive.

The initial building blocks that look the coolest to me right now is the RYO VC Sequencer, TrigXpander Kit and Paths.

Thanks for your help.
jjterbeek
I am also new to the modular and just got my Nerdseq sequencer. I think it got everything for working on sounds at home. And it will be expandable this year. Check it out!
Heliophile
parallelepiped wrote:

How are you sequencing the Basimilus Iteritas Alter? That thing seems awesome, but it seems like it needs a lot cv control to get the most out of it.

I think the RYO sequencer and gates expander, in combination with an OR-combiner, would be a pretty good place to start. A sequencer like that will be a permanently valuable tool in your rack anyway. I myself use Grids and/or the Doepfer clock divider/sequencer and some logic.
luketeaford
Welcome! The doepfer a151v2 is a great sequential switch. Patch sequences into it and switch among them. Very easy.

There are also ways to keep making new sequences from old ones-- lots of threads on strategies for that if you search.

I don't have BIA but it looks like you could throw cv from anything into it and be fine Guinness ftw!
sienisetä
Have you seen the Ladik S-180 sequencer? It's cheap and very expandable, I think you can add several of the CV out expansions to a single main S-180 module. If you need a simple utility sequencer for e.g. transposing other sequencers, Ladik 4-step sequencer line is also cheap and good.
Futuresound
Conceptually, mixing the output of a sequencer with the output of another sequencer that's clocked a different rate or has a different sequence length, can provide huge variety.

Decoupling gates from CV is also tremendously powerful - if you have some CV sequence running at one rate or sequence length, but your gates are running at a different rate or length, you get a lot more complexity.

And remember, you can use many things as sequencers. In my first example above, one or both sequencers could be the output of sample-and-hold circuits using almost anything as the input.

Finally, never underestimate the power of reset. With clever reset patters, you can derive great sequences from just a few steps of a simple sequencer.

I agree that the Ladik S180 is a great tool, I like the S183 expander since you get bigger knobs, but also the 'scale' control so you can limit the range of the knobs to just one octave or whatever you like.\

Pittsburgh Micro Sequence and Mimetic Digitalis are also cool options. You could even look into CV recorders like Mimetic Sequent to record and mangle sequences if you wanted to go that route.
JohnLRice
Like others have mentioned, two or more simple sequencers along with clock dividers, sequential switches, and precision adders etc can create a lot of variety. thumbs up

I haven't tried the Pittsburgh Micro Sequencer but it looks pretty fun. It has one mode where the top 4 steps can be transposed by the bottom 4 steps running at a slower clock rate, giving effectively a 16 step sequence.



The Synth Tech E102 delayed shift register module can work well for turning short static sequences into something more interesting as well:
joem
That's the approach I take: simple sequencers instead of complex sequencers. (None of the complex sequencers that exist for eurorack are what I'd actually want from a complex sequencer... Some are halfway there but still far enough away from my ideal that I can't bring myself to buy any of them.) For simple sequencers, I have Korg SQ-1, Erica Pico SEQ, Pittsburgh Lifeforms Micro Sequence, and Ladik S-141.

I use the SQ-1 for most of my proper sequencing... It's really great. You can have one 16-step sequence or two 8-step sequences (or shorten those by turning steps off), there are various play-direction settings, and it's very playable live too, since you can turn various things on or off and make steps jump manually. Plus it's cheap and doesn't use up precious rack space!

The Pittsburgh Micro Sequence is pretty great too. Quite powerful for such a small sequencer, and I really like the sliders since they make it very easy to see how you have the different steps set.

The S-141 and the Pico SEQ are both newer purchases, and I haven't really used them much yet.

That said, I do a lot of sequencing (or sequence modification) with various other modules, and it's not always in a controlled fashion. I have a Turing Machine (and a few expanders) that's great for making random, repeating, or slowly evolving sequences. I have a Ladik K-010 that I use for transposing sequences (with a precision adder) or for just manually playing notes. I have a Doepfer A-151 that's great for switching between sequences, no matter where they're coming from. A few small stepped random voltage generators (Kinks, 4R, something else I'm forgetting) that are good for random notes (when used with a quantizer) or transpositions (when attenuated and fed into a quantizer then a precision adder). I really love using (VC'd) LFOs with quantizers to come up with neat repeating-random sequences (kind of like a Turing Machine). All in all, I think there's A LOT that can be done with some simple sequencers and various other modules that are useful beyond sequencing.
parallelepiped
Thanks to everyone who has replied so far. screaming goo yo screaming goo yo

jjterbeek wrote:
I am also new to the modular and just got my Nerdseq sequencer. I think it got everything for working on sounds at home. And it will be expandable this year. Check it out!


The Nerdseq would be an example of a computer like module that I am considering avoiding.

Heliophile wrote:
I think the RYO sequencer and gates expander, in combination with an OR-combiner, would be a pretty good place to start. A sequencer like that will be a permanently valuable tool in your rack anyway. I myself use Grids and/or the Doepfer clock divider/sequencer and some logic.


What are you using for logic. Have you seen anything you wish you got instead?

sienisetä wrote:
Have you seen the Ladik S-180 sequencer? It's cheap and very expandable, I think you can add several of the CV out expansions to a single main S-180 module. If you need a simple utility sequencer for e.g. transposing other sequencers, Ladik 4-step sequencer line is also cheap and good.


This is a great suggestion. I had not seen it. Thank you.

Futuresound wrote:
And remember, you can use many things as sequencers. In my first example above, one or both sequencers could be the output of sample-and-hold circuits using almost anything as the input.


I had not thought of that. I would love to hear more ideas like that. Do you know of an article I can read?

Futuresound wrote:
I agree that the Ladik S180 is a great tool, I like the S183 expander since you get bigger knobs, but also the 'scale' control so you can limit the range of the knobs to just one octave or whatever you like.\

Pittsburgh Micro Sequence and Mimetic Digitalis are also cool options. You could even look into CV recorders like Mimetic Sequent to record and mangle sequences if you wanted to go that route.


Thanks for the specific recommendations. S183 does look more powerful. I am really excited about these modules. I need to dig into which ones can be combined etc.

I had the Pittsburgh 8-step on my list until I found the RYO. I hadn’t really looked into the Micro Sequence. I’ll take a closer look at it and the others.

JohnLRice wrote:
The module can work well for turning short static sequences into something more interesting as well:


Thanks for the idea. I had a similar idea with the Turing Machine sequencing the RYO.

joem wrote:
That's the approach I take....


Thanks for the information. Do you have a favorite stepped voltage generator?
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