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Millennials prefer music from 20th century?
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Author Millennials prefer music from 20th century?
Gizmo
According to this, based upon recognition. "Research has suggested that modern music really isn’t as good as the old classics."

https://metro.co.uk/2019/02/07/millennials-prefer-music-20th-century-g olden-age-pop-today-research-reveals-8462993/
IanEye
tim gueguen
Sounds like BS to me. It was published by the journal PLOS ONE which I've heard some dodgy things about. In any case a single scientific study on any subject should always be treated with caution.
commodorejohn
Yes, one should always exercise caution with these "studies show..." things, because you can find a study or two to support nearly any conclusion if you look hard enough and/or aren't too fussed about accurately representing the authors' conclusions.

On the other hand, who needs studies for this anyway? It's obvious.
mome rath
tim gueguen wrote:
Sounds like BS to me. It was published by the journal PLOS ONE which I've heard some dodgy things about. In any case a single scientific study on any subject should always be treated with caution.


PLoS ONE is not necessarilly a "dodgy" journal, but a CV ripe with PLoS ONE pubs won't get you on faculty anywhere
Rex Coil 7
commodorejohn wrote:
On the other hand, who needs studies for this anyway? It's obvious.
I agree! I've lost count of how many TV commercials these days use music from the 1970s. And not just for advertising items that appeal to old people. The use of 70s music in TV ads runs across the entire age demographic range.

Granted some ad execs have no clue about some songs' meanings .... "Barracuda" by Heart is NOT about a strong woman, it's about an untrustworthy self interested ill willed music industry snake. And the real shocker is the use of the song "Requiem for The Devil" by the Rolling Stones in car ads ... it's about the friggin DEVIL you morons!

Huge corporations wouldn't be using good music (almost exclusively from the 1970s, less so from the 1960s but still present) if today's pop music were worth a shit. 70s music is everywhere in television advertising these days, much of which is targeting Millennials and Hipsters

nanners

Here's a video that actually offers some rather scientific explanations of why today's pop music is utter crap. The click bate thumbnail is an ironic "shot" taken at how shallow most mainstream pup culture members' tastes are ....

kwaidan
I teach at the college level, and recently, I’ve noticed more and more inner city teenaged students wearing apparel for bands like Nirvana and Suicidal Tendancies or humming songs by The Clash and Black Sabbath.

A couple of years ago, I was shocked to hear an Iggy and the Stooges song, “Search and Destroy,” playing in the background of an Audi commmercial.
sizone
a lot of that is either irony or convenience. they sell nirvana and sublime tshirts at walmart
dan_p
I do think the last 10 to 15 years have been a golden age for interesting and outstanding music. Certainly some of the Jazz acts that have been coming through in abundance have been mind-blowing. Bands like Polar Bear, Bad Plus, Led Bib et al have been ground breaking bands making influential music. A lot of the new Jazz coming through was kick started by the great Esbjorn Svensson trio, IMO one of the most influential bands of modern times. Since them its been a constant stream of great original Jazz Music. Independent music is booming. Theres tiny labels putting out awesome completely original music like Andrew Weathers Label full spectrum. Artists like Sufjan Stevens and others like Julia Holter making brilliant records. Maybe independent music has always been this good, but these days its much more accessible. But I also think a musicians exposure to more than the mainstream is fostering a much more creative, original and exciting spread of sounds.

The only bad thing that's happened to new music in recent times is Record Store Day where record companies tie up pressing plants in order to repress a load of old shit to sell for £40 that you can buy for a pound in the charity shop if you can be bothered to look. I'd rather the shelves were full of new music!

so yes, maybe Pop music isn't as good as it was during certain periods over the last 50 years or so. But some Pop is actually quite good these days, well, at least some of it is clever and well produced in places. Most (prob all!) of it isn't my bag as I'd rather be challenged but going beyond the top 40 I think Music is in the best place its ever been. Theres just so much of it it gets lost in itself I guess.

I love old music, I'm a massive ZZ Top fan and I love The Band, captain Beefheart and all that, I also listen to 70's/80's ECM jazz type stuff, and of course, I've been a spud boy all my life. But I think theres so much good new music youngun's should be humming their own toons!

you kids get off my lawn
commodorejohn
Well, that's kind of the flip side though, isn't it? Independent music is better these days largely because mainstream "pop" has become such a rain-gutter for mechanistically-engineered, inhuman pablum that anybody who's actually interesting has been driven out into the genre ghettos. Which has had its downsides, in that pop is no longer the vibrant, inter-influential ur-genre that it was in the '70s-'80s, but on the other hand has absolutely strengthened the niches due to the resulting exodus.
Gizmo
Linda Ronstadt just said, "What they call country music now is what I call Midwest mall-crawler music. . . It doesn’t make much sense. It’s just suburban music."
https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-country/linda-ronstadt-interv iew-live-album-parkinsons-791219/
Gizmo
dan_p wrote:
Certainly some of the Jazz acts that have been coming through in abundance have been mind-blowing. . .

commodorejohn wrote:
Well, that's kind of the flip side though, isn't it? Independent music is better these days largely because mainstream "pop" has become such a rain-gutter for mechanistically-engineered, inhuman pablum that anybody who's actually interesting has been driven out into the genre ghettos.
I quite agree. Since "going underground" (avoiding pop entirely) from the time of the appearance of the Bee Gees I have lived in fear of missing the best new music, it being impossible to keep up with all of the alternative sources and channels of delivery. Funding was a factor too, as in the old days albums were relatively expensive for the "one song" worth having. Friends' referrals are usually fruitful but even that is happenstance. Gigging was not useful because of the confines of audience interest. Enjoyable new finds are always welcome (e.g. Stick Men) but still I always feel "late to the party" and, given the nature of life and limits of time, I endure the nagging realization that the "better party" is taking place down the street and out of my view.

Rex Coil 7 wrote:
I've lost count of how many TV commercials these days use music from the 1970s.
And Millennials know the words.

Rex Coil 7 wrote:
Granted some ad execs have no clue about some songs' meanings. . . And the real shocker is the use of the song "Requiem for The Devil" by the Rolling Stones in car ads ... it's about the friggin DEVIL you morons!
And "Start Me Up" -- especially if you know the not-family-friendly last two lines. Probably in advertising it's best to avoid the Stones altogether.
kwaidan
Now, there are too many choices. In the early sixties, there were three major TV networks and AM radio, which helped the Beatles dominate pop music and the media’s attention. With the rise of FM, more innovative acts like Pink Floyd and Led Zeppelin where given a voice, yet some, like the widely-influential Velvet Underground, were still ignored. In the eighties, MTV and college radio replaced AM, giving way to more innovation. As MTV began to die out, the market, as David Byrne predicted, really began to fragment, especially as more had access to the Internet.

In addition to a fragmented market, TV shows like American Idol have sold a false view of what is good music.
cycad73
Well, there's basically two things. The first happens in any era the second is specific to this era and perhaps has not been seen before in centuries.

1. Selection bias. We only remember the good and timeless music from the past. But we have both good/timeless and bad/ephemeral today. The ephemeral gets compared against the timeless and so there appears a decline that does not really exist. In other words, the game is already rigged to make the past appear better than it really was.

2. Collapse of the future. The bad/ephemeral could still have relevance today if it participates in some kind of positive vision of the future. Cheesy/throwaway music from early 90's rave culture or late 60's psychedelic era, or late 70's punk/postpunk at least had this effect. It was ephemeral, and most times bad and stupid but it still served a function that was neither bad nor stupid. Because it represented hope and a way forward. It helped people as they thought how to make a better world.

Unfortunately, at least in the mainstream, no such vision is possible today. The future, whether it's the total quantificaiton/gamificaiton of life via smart cities, or the technological singularity, or any of these variants all lead to the same place, annihilation. So there's absolutely no reason for someone to commit to any contemporary manifestation of culture because it's all a soundtrack to the total annihilation of man via platformization and millennials just like everyone else sense this and retreat to whatever's comfortable, whatever anesthetizes them from the horrors that presence and the even greater horrors that lie ahead.

Everything simply gets projected onto this conservation/acceleration axis where acceleration = death and conservation means foregoing any conception of the new and making things great again, in other words a cowardly retreat. And the latter is really beyond politics, both sides are equally conservationist and DOA in their thinking. It's fucked every which way you look and millennials sense this most acutely because they have never known another way. They know exactly how they are being suffocated and few seek ways out or third strategies or even know that the latter exist.

Indeed are ways out, ways that leap off the acceleration/conservation axis but you have to join a totally different world and timeline. This world is deep underground and subcultural but at least in it the idea of the future can live again. Any of the subcultures dealing with these ways out are extremely deep underground (despite being very prevalent in terms of headcount) and any attempt to surface them or build some kind of bridge just results in the person getting attacked and so things merely continue in closed communities with secret handshakes, private language, Do not talk about fight club etc. The exoteric is stigmatized or trivialized and the esoteric simply does not show up for those uninitiated even if there's otherwise no real "barrier" to initiation. The welcome mat is out and yet people ignore it and build their own walls. Gentrifying hipsters love to talk about how fucking "underground" they are but they forget the real meaning of underground which refers to the underground railroads and escaping concentration camps, escaping certain death and it is very much the same thing here. Once you remove the connotation of the camps from "underground" it has lost all meaning.. in other words "underground" is NOT a good state in which to be by any means...

So I don't know, other than these glimmers of hope that flicker deep underground and that are nowise certain to EVER emerge, we are all basically living in a global era of NO FUTURE... complete asphyxiation and suffocation and this manifests in music and the AI takeover of music that is already happening even though for now it's humans who are manually going through the motions, mimicking what AI singers, producers and so on will soon do, and again nobody will notice once the AI's actually run everything. Our collective retreat (it's not just millennials) into a past or an invented past in which only the best stuff's remembered is ultimately cowardly and accomplishes nothing but it's hardly incomprehensible given everything else that is happening.
sizone
Gizmo wrote:
And "Start Me Up" -- especially if you know the not-family-friendly last two lines. Probably in advertising it's best to avoid the Stones altogether.


the same weird obliviousness that thought an episode of beat bugs centered around "come together" was a good idea.
suboptimal
Advertisers use music that has proven market value. They don't base their decisions on the quality of the music, or its content for that matter.

Nostalgia sells like crazy.

Nirvana and other 90's acts are just today's "classic rock." In the 90's high schoolers loved Led Zeppelin. It's no different. Ridiculous arguments about which era is better than another are silly. There has always been good and bad music.

These questions of time are increasingly irrelevant. We're living in the postmodern age, when anyone can dwell (culturally) in whatever era they prefer. If you want to consume only entertainment made in the 1960s (books, movies, music, television) you can easily do so. A lot of people go to shows to film them on their phones for later consumption, literally placing a technological intervention between themselves any any sort of authentic experience. Strange times.
commodorejohn
suboptimal wrote:
These questions of time are increasingly irrelevant. We're living in the postmodern age, when anyone can dwell (culturally) in whatever era they prefer. If you want to consume only entertainment made in the 1960s (books, movies, music, television) you can easily do so.

Yes, but only if you never want to hear new stuff in a style that's fallen out of fashion in the commercial mainstream.
thetwlo
suboptimal wrote:
Advertisers use music that has proven market value. They don't base their decisions on the quality of the music, or its content for that matter.


really? ( i know, this is an exception)
thetwlo
Gizmo wrote:
According to this, based upon recognition. "Research has suggested that modern music really isn’t as good as the old classics."

https://metro.co.uk/2019/02/07/millennials-prefer-music-20th-century-g olden-age-pop-today-research-reveals-8462993/


seems like there's 80+ years from the 21st that they didn't' account for?
the 21st century is gone:
GuyaGuy
That's a horribly written article and it doesn't even link to its source.
onthebandwagon
not sure they know what they actually prefer
Panason
Quote:
And the real shocker is the use of the song "Requiem for The Devil" by the Rolling Stones in car ads ... it's about the friggin DEVIL you morons!


Precisely why its being used to advertise, and to advertise cars especially!

A diseased culture is likely to produce art and music that reflects the disease. Modern western(ised) culture is spiritually diseased and suffers from a host of diagnosable pathologies- whether from a Freudian or Jungian or "oriental" perspective you can surely find a lot of serious issues!

On the whole modern culture can be seen as being stuck in the early adolescence of a spoiled child who has it all and doesn't know what it wants....
Quote:
not sure they know what they actually prefer

...hence the constant 80s revivals.

Just walk into any supermarket and behold the normalised insanity!
onthebandwagon
[quote="Panason"]
Quote:

...hence the constant 80s revivals.

Just walk into any supermarket and behold the normalised insanity!


It’s a bit of a fetishized pseudo longing for an authenticity of an era without actually possessing the emotional intelligence to pursue an authentic life.
commodorejohn
I'd say the answer is more "all of the above." Popular culture is diseased because the culture as a whole is diseased, yes - and there is a definite element of people reaching into the past (even when they may not clearly remember or even have lived through a particular era) in search of an era when the disease was less advanced (or at least less manifest on the surface) behind the full-fledged nostalgia boom of the last 10-12 years.

But additionally, there's also the actual changes in popular culture itself (some quantifiable, some subjective) due to the progress of that disease. Pop music isn't merely perceived as worse today because the host culture is sicker, it's also measurably more over-compressed, more frequently mangled with auto-tune, etc. etc. Those are also symptoms of the disease.
kcd06
Quote:
Here's a video that actually offers some rather scientific explanations of why today's pop music is utter crap. The click bate thumbnail is an ironic "shot" taken at how shallow most mainstream pup culture members' tastes are ....



There are several replies to the "modern music is crap" video Rex linked above

One is direct: Thoughty2, Bad Music & The Decline of the Pop Song - My Response, via http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VfNdps0daF8

Another who may not be aware of the Thoughty opinion: Pop Music is Stuck on Repeat | Colin Morris | TEDxPenn, via http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_tjFwcmHy5M
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